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Thread: Victorian Barbecue Sauce Yield/Acidity Question

  1. #1
    Beti Guest

    Default Victorian Barbecue Sauce Yield/Acidity Question

    Hi everyone,

    Today I'm making Victorian Barbecue Sauce from the Ball Complete Book. The recipe is:
    8 cups chopped rhubarb
    3 1/2 cups brown sugar
    1 1/2 raisins
    1/2 cup white vinegar
    1 tsp each allspice, cinnamon, ginger, salt

    Everything is combined and simmered for about 30 minutes. It's supposed to resemble a thin commercial sauce and yield about 4 pints.

    I halved the recipe and, towards the end of the cooking, measured it as it looked scant. I got about 3 cups. I topped it off with hot water to make 4 cups and pureed it a bit since the rhubarb was still kind of chunky.

    I brought it back to a boil and when I put it in jars to process, I still needed to top each jar off with about a teaspoon of hot water.

    My chemistry classes were more years ago than I care to count but since water is neutral, it shouldn't have affected the overall chemistry, yes?

    Can someone weigh in my logic, please? Thank you!

  2. #2
    songbird Guest

    Default Re: Victorian Barbecue Sauce Yield/Acidity Question

    Beti wrote:
    ....
    > My chemistry classes were more years ago than I care to count but since water is neutral, it shouldn't have affected the overall chemistry, yes?
    >
    > Can someone weigh in my logic, please? Thank you!


    with that much sugar, salt, vinegar and the
    rhubarb you are likely ok, but i would have
    topped it with a little more vinegar in the
    water to be on the safe side.

    still i'd not worry.

    water pH varies by source, i wouldn't count it
    as neutral. vaguely recalling my past readings
    i think distilled water is very close to neutral
    and reverse osmosis water can be slightly acidic --
    bottled water is all over the map as also would
    be public municipality water.


    songbird (still chuckling at the 1 1/2 raisin which
    halved would be 3/4 raisin

  3. #3
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Victorian Barbecue Sauce Yield/Acidity Question

    On Wed, 15 Aug 2012 12:05:54 -0700 (PDT), Beti <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Hi everyone,
    >
    >Today I'm making Victorian Barbecue Sauce from the Ball Complete Book. The recipe is:
    >8 cups chopped rhubarb
    >3 1/2 cups brown sugar
    >1 1/2 raisins
    >1/2 cup white vinegar
    >1 tsp each allspice, cinnamon, ginger, salt
    >
    >Everything is combined and simmered for about 30 minutes. It's supposed to resemble a thin commercial sauce and yield about 4 pints.
    >
    >I halved the recipe and, towards the end of the cooking, measured it as it looked scant. I got about 3 cups. I topped it off with hot water to make 4 cups and pureed it a bit since the rhubarb was still kind of chunky.
    >
    >I brought it back to a boil and when I put it in jars to process, I still needed to top each jar off with about a teaspoon of hot water.
    >
    >My chemistry classes were more years ago than I care to count but since water is neutral, it shouldn't have affected the overall chemistry, yes?
    >
    >Can someone weigh in my logic, please? Thank you!


    Although water may be close to neutral in pH, by adding it to any
    approved canning recipe you will dilute the final pH of the product
    which is never a good idea.
    By adding one cup of water to 3 cups of product you have diluted both
    the sugar content and acidity by 33% which is considerable and in my
    opinion makes this sauce suitable only for refrigerator storage.
    I am open to correction by any chemists in the group.

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada

  4. #4
    Beti Guest

    Default Re: Victorian Barbecue Sauce Yield/Acidity Question

    On Thursday, August 16, 2012 9:00:26 AM UTC-7, songbird wrote:

    > songbird (still chuckling at the 1 1/2 raisin which
    >
    > halved would be 3/4 raisin


    Ha. I just used a very sharp knife and a little tiny scale!

  5. #5
    Beti Guest

    Default Re: Victorian Barbecue Sauce Yield/Acidity Question

    Thanks for your input. It was only two jars so making room for it in the fridge isn't a big deal. Since there is room for debate on this, I'll refrigerate it to be on the safe side. (It's was too good to end up wasting.)

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