Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Sweet chiles

  1. #1
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Sweet chiles

    Due to drought last year we didn't make much of a sweet chile crop (read
    bell peppers for Yanqui's). Yesterday we bought ten huge sweet chiles in
    orange, yellow, red, and green colors. Sale at the market was ten for
    ten bucks, I think we got our money's worth, each weighed in at over one
    pound.

    This morning I chopped them into one-half inch squares and they're now
    resting on two large bun pans in the big freezer. After two hours I will
    take them out and put them in vacuum bags in two-cup servings and put
    the bags, dated of course, back into the freezer. Should hold us into
    this years crop starts producing.

    Ordinarily sweet and hot chiles will produce fruit for at least ten
    months in our climate so we have become used to putting up lots of bags
    of them chopped for later cooking use. Not to mention all the fresh ones
    we eat off the plant and those we use in salads and for cooking fresh.

    I think we may be out of the two-year drought we've been suffering. Last
    week we received over eight inches of rain in two days, the backyard is
    still wet and the grass is growing fast enough we will have to mow
    today, if it doesn't rain again, which Ma Nature is threatening to do.

    We're in the process of planting the spring garden, green beans, sweet
    chiles, lettuce, okra a little later, Swiss chard (a two-season crop for
    us) and possibly some Tokyo Cross turnips. Thinking on this end is that
    we will still be here by fall as the housing market is just now starting
    to revive in our area. With several billion dollars in new construction
    due to start in mid-year we should see a boost in housing prices by
    then. As it is we're still fixing up this old house. We're seeing two
    things that are making a difference, the house looks a lot better and
    we're both losing weight and gaining some muscle strength back. Today
    I've got to crawl around in the attic and fix some vent stacks,
    particularly the one from the kitchen. The piping has come loose on the
    fan vent over the stove. Drat! Guys that installed it six years ago
    didn't bother to screw the joints together or tape them so that's going
    to be my job for today. I hate crawling around in attics, particularly
    since you can't stand up in ours.

    I also need to inventory jars, lids, and rings, looks like we may get a
    bumper crop of fruit this year. Hurrah!

    George,

    Father Confessor, HOSSPOJ

  2. #2
    songbird Guest

    Default Re: Sweet chiles

    George Shirley wrote:

    > Due to drought last year we didn't make much of a sweet chile crop (read
    > bell peppers for Yanqui's). Yesterday we bought ten huge sweet chiles in
    > orange, yellow, red, and green colors. Sale at the market was ten for
    > ten bucks, I think we got our money's worth, each weighed in at over one
    > pound.


    i get overruled when i want to put up green
    peppers in the freezer for making wimpy chili
    or sloppy joes. that's about all we use them
    for in the winter months, in a salad but those
    have to be fresh.

    still 10wks away from the warmer weather
    planting. i'll sneak some earlier cool
    weather seeds in when the ground thaws some
    more. should start seeing some spring flowers
    peeking up in a few weeks. why i keep planting
    so many, i love having that first color when
    everything else is so drab.


    ....
    > Ordinarily sweet and hot chiles will produce fruit for at least ten
    > months in our climate so we have become used to putting up lots of bags
    > of them chopped for later cooking use. Not to mention all the fresh ones
    > we eat off the plant and those we use in salads and for cooking fresh.


    wow, that's a long season, here that would amount
    to about six or seven pickings worth. how tall do
    they get?


    > I think we may be out of the two-year drought we've been suffering. Last
    > week we received over eight inches of rain in two days, the backyard is
    > still wet and the grass is growing fast enough we will have to mow
    > today, if it doesn't rain again, which Ma Nature is threatening to do.


    i'm glad to hear the rains have returned.
    been watching out for the harsh weather so far
    it is staying south of us. will be windy for
    a bit but that isn't unusual. which is why they
    are putting wind farms in around here.


    > We're in the process of planting the spring garden, green beans, sweet
    > chiles, lettuce, okra a little later, Swiss chard (a two-season crop for
    > us) and possibly some Tokyo Cross turnips.


    never heard of those kind of turnips before.
    going to try turnips for the first time here
    this spring. just the regular kind.


    > Thinking on this end is that
    > we will still be here by fall as the housing market is just now starting
    > to revive in our area. With several billion dollars in new construction
    > due to start in mid-year we should see a boost in housing prices by
    > then.


    i sure hope the recent increase of
    gas prices doesn't shut down the recovery
    that seems to be slowly going along... of
    course down that ways the higher gas prices
    mean more business activity from the oil
    industry... so it's good for y'all.


    > As it is we're still fixing up this old house. We're seeing two
    > things that are making a difference, the house looks a lot better and
    > we're both losing weight and gaining some muscle strength back. Today
    > I've got to crawl around in the attic and fix some vent stacks,
    > particularly the one from the kitchen. The piping has come loose on the
    > fan vent over the stove. Drat! Guys that installed it six years ago
    > didn't bother to screw the joints together or tape them so that's going
    > to be my job for today. I hate crawling around in attics, particularly
    > since you can't stand up in ours.


    this reminds me of working on one of the
    ceiling fans here. wasn't doing much, cleaned
    it out, replaced the motor with another one
    from the other bathroom just to see if that
    made any difference, etc. finally figured
    out that when ex-step-dad screwed the pipe
    together the screw was so long that it kept
    the flap pinned down too... so for 7yrs
    they were moving the air around, but not much
    actually made it outside... oops.


    > I also need to inventory jars, lids, and rings, looks like we may get a
    > bumper crop of fruit this year. Hurrah!


    friend just dropped off a huge box of jars.
    nice friend, i think i'll keep her. says she will
    have more for me when she gets further in her
    cleaning of her basement. she hasn't been canning
    much the past few years and finally admitted that
    she didn't want to any more. Ma gave away about
    80qts of various things this winter all around so
    we are glad to have a replenished supply of give
    away type jars that we don't worry so much if we
    get back.

    hurrah for you and hope you can get a lot of
    that put up so you have a supply for when you
    move before the new gardens and trees can produce.

    might be worth potting up a sprout of that
    lemon tree to take with you. sounds like a
    nice tree to keep propagating. even if it takes
    a while to fruit it will be nice for someone
    eventually. wish i could grow 'em here... too
    cold.


    songbird

  3. #3
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Sweet chiles

    On 3/2/2012 2:00 PM, songbird wrote:
    > George Shirley wrote:
    >
    >> Due to drought last year we didn't make much of a sweet chile crop (read
    >> bell peppers for Yanqui's). Yesterday we bought ten huge sweet chiles in
    >> orange, yellow, red, and green colors. Sale at the market was ten for
    >> ten bucks, I think we got our money's worth, each weighed in at over one
    >> pound.

    >
    > i get overruled when i want to put up green
    > peppers in the freezer for making wimpy chili
    > or sloppy joes. that's about all we use them
    > for in the winter months, in a salad but those
    > have to be fresh.
    >
    > still 10wks away from the warmer weather
    > planting. i'll sneak some earlier cool
    > weather seeds in when the ground thaws some
    > more. should start seeing some spring flowers
    > peeking up in a few weeks. why i keep planting
    > so many, i love having that first color when
    > everything else is so drab.
    >
    >
    > ...
    >> Ordinarily sweet and hot chiles will produce fruit for at least ten
    >> months in our climate so we have become used to putting up lots of bags
    >> of them chopped for later cooking use. Not to mention all the fresh ones
    >> we eat off the plant and those we use in salads and for cooking fresh.

    >
    > wow, that's a long season, here that would amount
    > to about six or seven pickings worth. how tall do
    > they get?
    >
    >
    >> I think we may be out of the two-year drought we've been suffering. Last
    >> week we received over eight inches of rain in two days, the backyard is
    >> still wet and the grass is growing fast enough we will have to mow
    >> today, if it doesn't rain again, which Ma Nature is threatening to do.

    >
    > i'm glad to hear the rains have returned.
    > been watching out for the harsh weather so far
    > it is staying south of us. will be windy for
    > a bit but that isn't unusual. which is why they
    > are putting wind farms in around here.
    >
    >
    >> We're in the process of planting the spring garden, green beans, sweet
    >> chiles, lettuce, okra a little later, Swiss chard (a two-season crop for
    >> us) and possibly some Tokyo Cross turnips.

    >
    > never heard of those kind of turnips before.
    > going to try turnips for the first time here
    > this spring. just the regular kind.
    >
    >
    >> Thinking on this end is that
    >> we will still be here by fall as the housing market is just now starting
    >> to revive in our area. With several billion dollars in new construction
    >> due to start in mid-year we should see a boost in housing prices by
    >> then.

    >
    > i sure hope the recent increase of
    > gas prices doesn't shut down the recovery
    > that seems to be slowly going along... of
    > course down that ways the higher gas prices
    > mean more business activity from the oil
    > industry... so it's good for y'all.
    >
    >
    >> As it is we're still fixing up this old house. We're seeing two
    >> things that are making a difference, the house looks a lot better and
    >> we're both losing weight and gaining some muscle strength back. Today
    >> I've got to crawl around in the attic and fix some vent stacks,
    >> particularly the one from the kitchen. The piping has come loose on the
    >> fan vent over the stove. Drat! Guys that installed it six years ago
    >> didn't bother to screw the joints together or tape them so that's going
    >> to be my job for today. I hate crawling around in attics, particularly
    >> since you can't stand up in ours.

    >
    > this reminds me of working on one of the
    > ceiling fans here. wasn't doing much, cleaned
    > it out, replaced the motor with another one
    > from the other bathroom just to see if that
    > made any difference, etc. finally figured
    > out that when ex-step-dad screwed the pipe
    > together the screw was so long that it kept
    > the flap pinned down too... so for 7yrs
    > they were moving the air around, but not much
    > actually made it outside... oops.
    >
    >
    >> I also need to inventory jars, lids, and rings, looks like we may get a
    >> bumper crop of fruit this year. Hurrah!

    >
    > friend just dropped off a huge box of jars.
    > nice friend, i think i'll keep her. says she will
    > have more for me when she gets further in her
    > cleaning of her basement. she hasn't been canning
    > much the past few years and finally admitted that
    > she didn't want to any more. Ma gave away about
    > 80qts of various things this winter all around so
    > we are glad to have a replenished supply of give
    > away type jars that we don't worry so much if we
    > get back.


    Anytime you're gifted with jars it's time to celebrate. Friend used to
    use a lot of those Classico Mason jars, unfortunately they changed the
    lid a few years ago and they're worthless now.
    >
    > hurrah for you and hope you can get a lot of
    > that put up so you have a supply for when you
    > move before the new gardens and trees can produce.
    >
    > might be worth potting up a sprout of that
    > lemon tree to take with you. sounds like a
    > nice tree to keep propagating. even if it takes
    > a while to fruit it will be nice for someone
    > eventually. wish i could grow 'em here... too
    > cold.
    >
    >
    > songbird

    It is a Ponderosa lemon, a natural cross between a grapefruit and a
    lemon, fruit can be as large as three pounds. They sell them very cheap
    were we're moving because they are so hardy. The rind is very thick and
    the juice is more tart than ordinary lemons, regular lemon juice tastes
    weak to us. We will probably buy a six or seven foot lemon tree once we
    move and, in our climate, it will grow several feet a year. Our old
    Ponderosa had to be pruned back annually by at least six feet in height
    and lots of outgrowth also had to be pruned, if you didn't it would get
    away from you. I may have mentioned that Ponderosa breeds true from
    seeds or root scions. We've probably given away over a hundred of them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32