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Thread: storing trail mix in the fridge

  1. #1
    AndyHancock Guest

    Default storing trail mix in the fridge

    I tried to find a more suitable group for this question, but
    couldn't. So thanks if anyone from this group can chime in what they
    know.

    My trail mix contains nuts and dried fruit. From web surfing, it
    seems that for long term storage, dried goods can be stored in an air-
    tight container in a cool dry place (I don't know why dryness is
    important if the container is air tight). After it has been opened,
    however, it is recommended the container be resealed and stored in the
    fridge for 1 to 1.5 months.

    My scenario is that I buy trail from bulk bins and put them in an air
    tight jar in the fridge. I use the trail mix a few times a week, and
    it lasts for about a month. It seems to be aligned with the above
    general wisdom.

    However, I have heard that, at least for coffee beans and ground
    coffee, storing the sealed container in the fridge will cause the
    moisture in the air within the jar to condense, which quickly causes
    the coffee to degrade. The moist air gets into the jar whenever I
    open and get some coffee. When it is in the fridge, it condenses.
    Next time I open the jar, more moist air goes in, and more
    condensation forms when it cools in the fridge. Hense, the condensed
    moisture accumulates.

    My main quesution is why is this not a concern for dried goods such as
    trail mix?

    And as a secondary curiosity (not the main question), wouldn't the
    fridge be a good storage place for long term storage, i.e., without
    frequent opening of the sealed container?

  2. #2
    songbird Guest

    Default Re: storing trail mix in the fridge

    AndyHancock wrote:

    ....
    > My main quesution is why is this not a concern for dried goods such as
    > trail mix?


    perhaps it is the point you make about it
    being consumed quickly enough that it doesn't
    matter or doesn't make a noticeable difference.

    one way to avoid condensation would be to
    let the container come to room temperature
    before opening it.

    or i suppose you could get out the hair
    dryer and retoast the top of the jar to
    remove some of any condensation, but that
    sounds a bit funny.


    > And as a secondary curiosity (not the main question), wouldn't the
    > fridge be a good storage place for long term storage, i.e., without
    > frequent opening of the sealed container?


    sure, but for many kinds of nuts the freezer can
    be a better place for storage for longer term as
    it will keep the oils from going rancid.


    songbird

  3. #3
    Shawn Martin Guest

    Default Re: storing trail mix in the fridge

    On 10/8/2012 6:24 PM, AndyHancock wrote:
    > I tried to find a more suitable group for this question, but
    > couldn't. So thanks if anyone from this group can chime in what they
    > know.
    >
    > My trail mix contains nuts and dried fruit. From web surfing, it
    > seems that for long term storage, dried goods can be stored in an air-
    > tight container in a cool dry place (I don't know why dryness is
    > important if the container is air tight). After it has been opened,
    > however, it is recommended the container be resealed and stored in the
    > fridge for 1 to 1.5 months.


    Once you have let oxygen into the container, it will start to turn the
    oils in the nuts rancid. Keeping it in the fridge slows the process down.

    >
    > My scenario is that I buy trail from bulk bins and put them in an air
    > tight jar in the fridge. I use the trail mix a few times a week, and
    > it lasts for about a month. It seems to be aligned with the above
    > general wisdom.


    If you are using it up in a month, it probably doesn't matter how you
    store it. Keeping it out of direct light would be my goal.
    >
    > However, I have heard that, at least for coffee beans and ground
    > coffee, storing the sealed container in the fridge will cause the
    > moisture in the air within the jar to condense, which quickly causes
    > the coffee to degrade. The moist air gets into the jar whenever I
    > open and get some coffee. When it is in the fridge, it condenses.
    > Next time I open the jar, more moist air goes in, and more
    > condensation forms when it cools in the fridge. Hense, the condensed
    > moisture accumulates.


    It also lets in wild yeasts, molds and other nasties. Coffee has not
    been treated with sulfates to retard molds and such. The fruit in your
    trail mix probably has.
    >
    > My main quesution is why is this not a concern for dried goods such as
    > trail mix?


    See above

    >
    > And as a secondary curiosity (not the main question), wouldn't the
    > fridge be a good storage place for long term storage, i.e., without
    > frequent opening of the sealed container?


    I keep a couple of pounds of coffee in my freezer. This is sent to me
    from Hawaii. I don't use it every day. Usually I would only buy these
    things, (food items stored at room temp.) in quantities which would last
    about a week, but the shipping from Hawaii is such that I feel obligated
    to purchase 5 pounds at a time. So, my Kona coffee lives in the
    freezer, and I dip into it once a week, or so.


    Just my .02



  4. #4
    AndyHancock Guest

    Default Re: storing trail mix in the fridge

    On Oct 9, 11:03 pm, songbird <songb...@anthive.com> wrote:
    > AndyHancock wrote:
    >> My main quesution is why is this not a concern for dried goods such
    >> as trail mix?

    >
    > perhaps it is the point you make about it being consumed quickly
    > enough that it doesn't matter or doesn't make a noticeable
    > difference.


    I would have expected a month-long exposure to moisture would be
    detrimental, but I'm not basing this on any scientific knowledge on my
    part. It's just that if I left a damp rag in the corner, and kept it
    damp for a few weeks, it would get stinky.

    > one way to avoid condensation would be to let the container come to
    > room temperature before opening it.


    Yes, that would certainly work. It wouldn't be convenient, but it
    would work.

    > or i suppose you could get out the hair dryer and retoast the top of
    > the jar to remove some of any condensation, but that sounds a bit
    > funny.


    The stuff on the inside would still be cold, though. The moment room
    air contacts the cold stuff, moisture would condense out of the air
    onto the surface of the stuff.

    >> And as a secondary curiosity (not the main question), wouldn't the
    >> fridge be a good storage place for long term storage, i.e., without
    >> frequent opening of the sealed container?

    >
    > sure, but for many kinds of nuts the freezer can be a better place
    > for storage for longer term as it will keep the oils from going
    > rancid.


    I can see that rationale. However, I was contrasting the option of
    long term storage in the fridge rather than a cool dark place. The
    latter seems to pervade the information I found in my web wanderings.

  5. #5
    AndyHancock Guest

    Default Re: storing trail mix in the fridge

    On Oct 10, 12:59 pm, Shawn Martin <painl...@starband.net> wrote:
    > On 10/8/2012 6:24 PM, AndyHancock wrote:
    >> I tried to find a more suitable group for this question, but
    >> couldn't. So thanks if anyone from this group can chime in what
    >> they know.

    >
    >> My trail mix contains nuts and dried fruit. From web surfing, it
    >> seems that for long term storage, dried goods can be stored in an
    >> air- tight container in a cool dry place (I don't know why dryness
    >> is important if the container is air tight). After it has been
    >> opened, however, it is recommended the container be resealed and
    >> stored in the fridge for 1 to 1.5 months.

    >
    > Once you have let oxygen into the container, it will start to turn
    > the oils in the nuts rancid. Keeping it in the fridge slows the
    > process down.


    Makes sense.

    >> My scenario is that I buy trail from bulk bins and put them in an
    >> air tight jar in the fridge. I use the trail mix a few times a
    >> week, and it lasts for about a month. It seems to be aligned with
    >> the above general wisdom.

    >
    > If you are using it up in a month, it probably doesn't matter how
    > you store it. Keeping it out of direct light would be my goal.


    Good to know. This is pretty well my current practice.

    >> However, I have heard that, at least for coffee beans and ground
    >> coffee, storing the sealed container in the fridge will cause the
    >> moisture in the air within the jar to condense, which quickly
    >> causes the coffee to degrade. The moist air gets into the jar
    >> whenever I open and get some coffee. When it is in the fridge, it
    >> condenses. Next time I open the jar, more moist air goes in, and
    >> more condensation forms when it cools in the fridge. Hense, the
    >> condensed moisture accumulates.

    >
    > It also lets in wild yeasts, molds and other nasties. Coffee has
    > not been treated with sulfates to retard molds and such. The fruit
    > in your trail mix probably has.


    Now this is unsettling. Next time I visit the shop, I will check the
    ingredients.

    >> My main quesution is why is this not a concern for dried goods such
    >> as trail mix?

    >
    > See above
    >
    >
    >
    >> And as a secondary curiosity (not the main question), wouldn't the
    >> fridge be a good storage place for long term storage, i.e., without
    >> frequent opening of the sealed container?

    >
    > I keep a couple of pounds of coffee in my freezer. This is sent to
    > me from Hawaii. I don't use it every day. Usually I would only buy
    > these things, (food items stored at room temp.) in quantities which
    > would last about a week, but the shipping from Hawaii is such that I
    > feel obligated to purchase 5 pounds at a time. So, my Kona coffee
    > lives in the freezer, and I dip into it once a week, or so.
    >
    > Just my .02


    Makes sense. Thanks.

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