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Thread: Size of pressure canner?

  1. #1
    mnbaldonado Guest

    Default Size of pressure canner?


    I am looking for a pressure canner, but am confused about how to tell
    the size. If it says 16 qts or 21 qts, etc, how many quart jars do the
    different sizes hold? Can anyone help me with this? Looks like there
    are a lot of experienced canners out there.




    --
    mnbaldonado

  2. #2
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    "mnbaldonado" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I am looking for a pressure canner, but am confused about how to tell
    > the size. If it says 16 qts or 21 qts, etc, how many quart jars do the
    > different sizes hold? Can anyone help me with this? Looks like there
    > are a lot of experienced canners out there.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > mnbaldonado


    I am not sure that you can tell just from that description because it also
    depends on the diameter and height of the pot. For example, I have a Mirro
    brand pressure canner. model M-0512-11 (they don't make it anymore, but I
    can still find replacement parts). It says it's 12 quarts or 11.4 liters.
    However, I can fit 7 quart jars in it. Someone else can correct me if I'm
    wrong, but I think that even if they're larger, say 16 or 21 quarts they
    will still do only 7 quart jars, but the difference is that they're taller
    and you can actually double stack pint jars in them. I keep thinking that
    there might be ones tall enough to do a double stack of quarts, too, but
    since I'm not in the market for a new canner, I haven't looked lately.

    If you look at http://www.pressurecooker-outlet.com/, it lists a variety of
    different canners. If you actually click on one of them, you'll get a full
    description that says how many quarts or pints fit in each size. For
    example, there's a huge All American 41-quart canner which says it holds 32
    pint jars or 19 quart jars. Me, I personally wouldn't want to load
    something that huge. But I suppose if you had a ton of stuff to pressure
    can on one day and lots of help preparing the product and filling the jars,
    it might be worth it.



    --
    -Marilyn



  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    mnbaldonado wrote:
    > I am looking for a pressure canner, but am confused about how to tell
    > the size. If it says 16 qts or 21 qts, etc, how many quart jars do the
    > different sizes hold? Can anyone help me with this? Looks like there
    > are a lot of experienced canners out there.
    >
    >
    >
    >



    12 quart and 16 quart pressure canners will hold 7 quart jars. 21 or 22
    quart canners will hold 14 quart jars (2 layers with a rank between).

    Mirro makes a smaller one that holds 7 pint jars; I think it's 8 quart,
    and it's not tall enough to hold any quart jars. HTH

    Bob

  4. #4
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    On Mon 14 Sep 2009 05:54:39p, mnbaldonado told us...

    >
    > I am looking for a pressure canner, but am confused about how to tell
    > the size. If it says 16 qts or 21 qts, etc, how many quart jars do the
    > different sizes hold? Can anyone help me with this? Looks like there
    > are a lot of experienced canners out there.


    IMO, you need to know the exact dimensions of the vessel (diameter and
    height), to determine how many quart jars it will hold. IIRC, the stated
    capacity is the volume of the vessel, not the number of jars it will hold.

    Also, many canners come with two racks, which allow you to stack two layers
    of pint jars.

    If you know the diameter, you can make a paper template and arrange quart
    jars on it to determine precisely how many jars will fit. I have never
    seen a canner that will accomodate to layers of quart jars.

    I inherited a very old canner (cannot remember the brand, but it was well
    known), that passed from my grandmother who used it in the 1940s and 1950s,
    then passed to my parents who used it into the early 1990s. The original
    booklet came with it and stated the capacity as 24 quarts. I believe it
    actually holds 16 quart jars. The rack is unique to me, in that it has
    "holders" that the jars fit in. It can also be double stacked with pint
    jars.

    Bottom line, though, is to get the dimensions and calculate the layout of
    the jars to determine the number.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ************************************************** **********************
    Enchant, stay beautiful and graceful, but do this, eat well. Bring
    the same consideration to the preparation of your food as you
    devote to your appearance. Let your dinner be a poem, like your
    dress. Charles Pierre Monselet,French journalist




  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > On Mon 14 Sep 2009 05:54:39p, mnbaldonado told us...
    >
    >> I am looking for a pressure canner, but am confused about how to tell
    >> the size. If it says 16 qts or 21 qts, etc, how many quart jars do the
    >> different sizes hold? Can anyone help me with this? Looks like there
    >> are a lot of experienced canners out there.

    >
    > IMO, you need to know the exact dimensions of the vessel (diameter and
    > height), to determine how many quart jars it will hold. IIRC, the stated
    > capacity is the volume of the vessel, not the number of jars it will hold.
    >
    > Also, many canners come with two racks, which allow you to stack two layers
    > of pint jars.
    >
    > If you know the diameter, you can make a paper template and arrange quart
    > jars on it to determine precisely how many jars will fit. I have never
    > seen a canner that will accomodate to layers of quart jars.
    >
    > I inherited a very old canner (cannot remember the brand, but it was well
    > known), that passed from my grandmother who used it in the 1940s and 1950s,
    > then passed to my parents who used it into the early 1990s. The original
    > booklet came with it and stated the capacity as 24 quarts. I believe it
    > actually holds 16 quart jars. The rack is unique to me, in that it has
    > "holders" that the jars fit in. It can also be double stacked with pint
    > jars.
    >
    > Bottom line, though, is to get the dimensions and calculate the layout of
    > the jars to determine the number.
    >

    My old Sears canner (Presto made) is rated at 18 quarts and will hold
    seven each of either pints or quarts. It also has the rack that has "jar
    holders." I think that's the way most of the old ones were made to keep
    you from jamming jars up against one another so they would be jostled.
    I've never had enough stuff to can that I had to double stack my pints
    but the original manual says it can be done.

  6. #6
    mnbaldonado Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?


    mnbaldonado;1377417 Wrote:
    > I am looking for a pressure canner, but am confused about how to tell
    > the size. If it says 16 qts or 21 qts, etc, how many quart jars do the
    > different sizes hold? Can anyone help me with this? Looks like there
    > are a lot of experienced canners out there.


    Great! I appreciate all of your replies, they have been very helpful. I
    am on my way now and know what I am looking for. I appreciate all of
    your responses. Thank you so much!




    --
    mnbaldonado

  7. #7
    Dan L. Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    mnbaldonado <[email protected]> wrote:

    > mnbaldonado;1377417 Wrote:
    > > I am looking for a pressure canner, but am confused about how to tell
    > > the size. If it says 16 qts or 21 qts, etc, how many quart jars do the
    > > different sizes hold? Can anyone help me with this? Looks like there
    > > are a lot of experienced canners out there.

    >
    > Great! I appreciate all of your replies, they have been very helpful. I
    > am on my way now and know what I am looking for. I appreciate all of
    > your responses. Thank you so much!


    I will add my 2 cents. I have a small pressure canner All American 10.5
    quart which holds 4 quart standard jars or 7 pint jars. My canner is
    about 13 inches wide 15 inches high. I am glad I got the smaller one. I
    have a microwave above my stove if my canner was three inches taller it
    would NOT fit on my stove. Also I turn the canner so the steam venting
    for ten minutes is blasting in front and away from microwave oven. I can
    only pints for just me and I.

    My pressure canner takes up less stove space than the water bath canner.
    So I have four burners going. (1)The cooking pot. (2)The pot that keeps
    the jars hot. (3) smaller pot for simmering the lids. (4) The canner
    (water bath or pressure).

    While I am pressuring one batch I start a second batch. I cannot imagine
    using bigger canners and cooking pots unless one has a super gigantic
    stove. I am new at this canning game - Does this system sound just about
    right for everyone For me smaller is better.

    Enjoy Life... Dan L

    --
    Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

  8. #8
    Connie TenClay Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    Yes this sound quite normal. If you wish to free up a burner you can
    use a small crock pot to keep your lids hot and not need that pan on the
    stove. Also I often just fill a sink with hot water to heat up the jars
    since they will be processed (at least 10 minutes) there is no need to
    sterilize them and all I figure I need to do is make sure that they are
    not cold so that there isn't any thermal shock. This will also free up
    another burner.
    Connie TC
    >
    > My pressure canner takes up less stove space than the water bath canner.
    > So I have four burners going. (1)The cooking pot. (2)The pot that keeps
    > the jars hot. (3) smaller pot for simmering the lids. (4) The canner
    > (water bath or pressure).
    >
    > While I am pressuring one batch I start a second batch. I cannot imagine
    > using bigger canners and cooking pots unless one has a super gigantic
    > stove. I am new at this canning game - Does this system sound just about
    > right for everyone For me smaller is better.
    >
    > Enjoy Life... Dan L
    >


  9. #9
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    "Connie TenClay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:suUrm.232708$[email protected]..
    > Yes this sound quite normal. If you wish to free up a burner you can use
    > a small crock pot to keep your lids hot and not need that pan on the
    > stove. Also I often just fill a sink with hot water to heat up the jars
    > since they will be processed (at least 10 minutes) there is no need to
    > sterilize them and all I figure I need to do is make sure that they are
    > not cold so that there isn't any thermal shock. This will also free up
    > another burner.
    > Connie TC
    >>
    >> My pressure canner takes up less stove space than the water bath canner.
    >> So I have four burners going. (1)The cooking pot. (2)The pot that keeps
    >> the jars hot. (3) smaller pot for simmering the lids. (4) The canner
    >> (water bath or pressure). While I am pressuring one batch I start a
    >> second batch. I cannot imagine using bigger canners and cooking pots
    >> unless one has a super gigantic stove. I am new at this canning game -
    >> Does this system sound just about right for everyone For me smaller is
    >> better.
    >>
    >> Enjoy Life... Dan L
    >>



    When I'm doing pressure canning, I have my big skillet on a back burner and
    I put the jars upside down in it along with about an inch of water (holds
    seven quart jars). I get the water boiling and turn it down to simmer. The
    jars get hot so that I don't have a problem with the thermal shock and I
    don't have to have another huge pot full of water on the stove. I'll also
    stick the lids in there for a little while before it's time to put the
    product in the jars to go into the pressure canner.

    Sometimes I'll use the same skillet method for heating the jars when I'm
    doing BWB canning, but usually I'll just put the jars in the canner covered
    with water and keep them on medium heat while I'm getting the stuff ready to
    put in them.

    --
    -Marilyn



  10. #10
    Dan L. Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    In article <h8pafp$c95$[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Connie TenClay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:suUrm.232708$[email protected]..
    > > Yes this sound quite normal. If you wish to free up a burner you can use
    > > a small crock pot to keep your lids hot and not need that pan on the
    > > stove. Also I often just fill a sink with hot water to heat up the jars
    > > since they will be processed (at least 10 minutes) there is no need to
    > > sterilize them and all I figure I need to do is make sure that they are
    > > not cold so that there isn't any thermal shock. This will also free up
    > > another burner.
    > > Connie TC
    > >>
    > >> My pressure canner takes up less stove space than the water bath canner.
    > >> So I have four burners going. (1)The cooking pot. (2)The pot that keeps
    > >> the jars hot. (3) smaller pot for simmering the lids. (4) The canner
    > >> (water bath or pressure). While I am pressuring one batch I start a
    > >> second batch. I cannot imagine using bigger canners and cooking pots
    > >> unless one has a super gigantic stove. I am new at this canning game -
    > >> Does this system sound just about right for everyone For me smaller is
    > >> better.
    > >>
    > >> Enjoy Life... Dan L
    > >>

    >
    >
    > When I'm doing pressure canning, I have my big skillet on a back burner and
    > I put the jars upside down in it along with about an inch of water (holds
    > seven quart jars). I get the water boiling and turn it down to simmer. The
    > jars get hot so that I don't have a problem with the thermal shock and I
    > don't have to have another huge pot full of water on the stove. I'll also
    > stick the lids in there for a little while before it's time to put the
    > product in the jars to go into the pressure canner.
    >
    > Sometimes I'll use the same skillet method for heating the jars when I'm
    > doing BWB canning, but usually I'll just put the jars in the canner covered
    > with water and keep them on medium heat while I'm getting the stuff ready to
    > put in them.


    Hmmm ... Interesting.

    I do have a crockpot and a samll electric kettle. That could free up
    extra space if I needed an extra burner. I have often wondered if I put
    the jars and lids in the dishwasher, would that be hot enough for jars
    and lids when wash cycle is done?

    My sink is usually filled with the stems and dirt from cleaning the
    fruit before I process them. And while the pressure cooking is going, I
    am taking apart and washing the roma strainer.

    For now four burners seem to do the job. I am still happy with the
    smaller pressure canner. Even if I had the extra burner space, a larger
    canner would not fit under the microwave. Hmmm ... heat the jars with
    water in the microwave

    An added note - the small canner seems to heats up fast and cools down
    fast. Like 4-5 minutes when venting starts, 10 minutes to vent, 4-5
    minutes to reach ten lbs of pressure, 15+ minutes cooking time, 4-5
    minutes cool down to zero lbs, remove weight and wait 2 minutes, remove
    lid, here pop pop pop... all lids seal before 10 minutes, move jars to
    counter. After about 45 - 60 minutes done. Does this sound about right?

    One question - Why use a skillet when a pot will work better?

    Enjoy Life... Dan L

    --
    Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

  11. #11
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    "Dan L." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <h8pafp$c95$[email protected]>,
    > "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Connie TenClay" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:suUrm.232708$[email protected]..
    >> > Yes this sound quite normal. If you wish to free up a burner you can
    >> > use
    >> > a small crock pot to keep your lids hot and not need that pan on the
    >> > stove. Also I often just fill a sink with hot water to heat up the
    >> > jars
    >> > since they will be processed (at least 10 minutes) there is no need to
    >> > sterilize them and all I figure I need to do is make sure that they are
    >> > not cold so that there isn't any thermal shock. This will also free up
    >> > another burner.
    >> > Connie TC
    >> >>
    >> >> My pressure canner takes up less stove space than the water bath
    >> >> canner.
    >> >> So I have four burners going. (1)The cooking pot. (2)The pot that
    >> >> keeps
    >> >> the jars hot. (3) smaller pot for simmering the lids. (4) The canner
    >> >> (water bath or pressure). While I am pressuring one batch I start a
    >> >> second batch. I cannot imagine using bigger canners and cooking pots
    >> >> unless one has a super gigantic stove. I am new at this canning game -
    >> >> Does this system sound just about right for everyone For me smaller
    >> >> is
    >> >> better.
    >> >>
    >> >> Enjoy Life... Dan L
    >> >>

    >>
    >>
    >> When I'm doing pressure canning, I have my big skillet on a back burner
    >> and
    >> I put the jars upside down in it along with about an inch of water (holds
    >> seven quart jars). I get the water boiling and turn it down to simmer.
    >> The
    >> jars get hot so that I don't have a problem with the thermal shock and I
    >> don't have to have another huge pot full of water on the stove. I'll
    >> also
    >> stick the lids in there for a little while before it's time to put the
    >> product in the jars to go into the pressure canner.
    >>
    >> Sometimes I'll use the same skillet method for heating the jars when I'm
    >> doing BWB canning, but usually I'll just put the jars in the canner
    >> covered
    >> with water and keep them on medium heat while I'm getting the stuff ready
    >> to
    >> put in them.

    >
    > Hmmm ... Interesting.
    >
    > I do have a crockpot and a samll electric kettle. That could free up
    > extra space if I needed an extra burner. I have often wondered if I put
    > the jars and lids in the dishwasher, would that be hot enough for jars
    > and lids when wash cycle is done?


    If you're just using them for the pressure canner, I think that's listed as
    an acceptable method. The trick is making sure they're still hot when
    you're ready to use them. I don't know about the lids, though.
    >
    > My sink is usually filled with the stems and dirt from cleaning the
    > fruit before I process them. And while the pressure cooking is going, I
    > am taking apart and washing the roma strainer.
    >
    > For now four burners seem to do the job. I am still happy with the
    > smaller pressure canner. Even if I had the extra burner space, a larger
    > canner would not fit under the microwave. Hmmm ... heat the jars with
    > water in the microwave


    We took our microwave that was over the stove out and replaced it with a
    very nice, stainless-steel vent hood. Microwaves over the stove get really,
    really greasy inside and are a pain to clean, in my opinion. I now have a
    huge, stainless-steel microwave sitting on a cabinet designed for that.

    I think I read somewhere that you shouldn't do that heat the jars for
    canning in the microwave, though.

    > An added note - the small canner seems to heats up fast and cools down
    > fast. Like 4-5 minutes when venting starts, 10 minutes to vent, 4-5
    > minutes to reach ten lbs of pressure, 15+ minutes cooking time, 4-5
    > minutes cool down to zero lbs, remove weight and wait 2 minutes, remove
    > lid, here pop pop pop... all lids seal before 10 minutes, move jars to
    > counter. After about 45 - 60 minutes done. Does this sound about right?


    Well, you said it's a really small canner. I honestly don't know. See, I
    have a weighted-gauge canner, so I have no way to know that the pressure is
    down to zero, other than the directions in the manual that tell me to wait
    45 minutes to an hour before removing the weight and the lid. How do you
    know that it only takes 4-5 minutes in yours to reach zero pressure if you
    have a weighted-gauge one? Was that in the manual that came with it?

    > One question - Why use a skillet when a pot will work better?


    Years ago, I had an electric skillet that I could set on the counter next to
    the stove and I would heat the jars that way. I actually liked not having
    to have one more thing on the stove. It also takes less water to do it that
    way. The end result is the same, though, that the jars get hot enough to
    not suffer thermal shock when I add boiling water to them, such as when I'm
    doing green beans. I'm not sure why you think the pot works better. If I
    heat my jars for pressure canning in a pot filled with water, that means I
    have to have my BWB canner filled with water because it's the only other pot
    I have large enough to fill and cover the jars. It actually only fits well
    on the front right burner, which is also where I put the pressure canner.
    Yeah, I could heat the jars on that burner, but then I have to shuffle pots
    when I put the jars in the canner itself. On the other hand, my skillet
    will fit on the back left burner. With the BWB canning, it's a no brainer
    to heat the jars in the canner itself because I have to heat that water up
    for canning anyway.

    If I could have my dream kitchen it would be to have a stove with more than
    four burners or two stoves side by side. Canning would be a lot easier.



    --
    -Marilyn



  12. #12
    smyrnaquince Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    I have an old (50 years?) Mirro of the size you mention. It was sold
    as a pressure cooker/canner. It has thick aluminum walls and my
    family always used it for pressure canning. Now, though, I'm not sure
    if I should use it because all the USDA recipes call for the larger
    canners and say that the heat-up and cool-down (both of which are
    untimed) constitute part of the canning process. The USDA does not
    recommend use of the 8-quart pressure canner.

    Is anyone out there using one of these smaller canners?

    Dave

    On Sep 15, 12:42*am, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    >
    > Mirro makes a smaller one that holds 7 pint jars; I think it's 8 quart,
    > and it's not tall enough to hold any quart jars. *HTH
    >
    > Bob



  13. #13
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    smyrnaquince wrote:
    > I have an old (50 years?) Mirro of the size you mention. It was sold
    > as a pressure cooker/canner. It has thick aluminum walls and my
    > family always used it for pressure canning. Now, though, I'm not sure
    > if I should use it because all the USDA recipes call for the larger
    > canners and say that the heat-up and cool-down (both of which are
    > untimed) constitute part of the canning process. The USDA does not
    > recommend use of the 8-quart pressure canner.
    >
    > Is anyone out there using one of these smaller canners?
    >
    > Dave
    >
    > On Sep 15, 12:42 am, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    >> Mirro makes a smaller one that holds 7 pint jars; I think it's 8 quart,
    >> and it's not tall enough to hold any quart jars. HTH
    >>
    >> Bob

    >



    I use mine occasionally. The only things I pressure-can in pint jars is
    salsa (hot-packed, and it's acid enough that it might could be processed
    in BWB) and meat (which is processed for such a long time the heat-up
    and cool-down times are insignificant)

    If you have one and are worried about it, just give it an extra few
    minutes processing time, then throw a dry towel over the cooker to slow
    down the cool-down.

    Bob

  14. #14
    Dan L. Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    In article <h8ptfu$hg0$[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Well, you said it's a really small canner. I honestly don't know. See, I
    > have a weighted-gauge canner, so I have no way to know that the pressure is
    > down to zero, other than the directions in the manual that tell me to wait
    > 45 minutes to an hour before removing the weight and the lid. How do you
    > know that it only takes 4-5 minutes in yours to reach zero pressure if you
    > have a weighted-gauge one? Was that in the manual that came with it?


    My pressure canner has a weighted gauge and a pressure/temperature gauge.
    It is not a dialed gauge canner.

    > > One question - Why use a skillet when a pot will work better?

    >
    > Years ago, I had an electric skillet that I could set on the counter next to
    > the stove and I would heat the jars that way. I actually liked not having
    > to have one more thing on the stove. It also takes less water to do it that
    > way. The end result is the same, though, that the jars get hot enough to
    > not suffer thermal shock when I add boiling water to them, such as when I'm
    > doing green beans. I'm not sure why you think the pot works better.


    Past post stated:
    > When I'm doing pressure canning, I have my big skillet on a back burner and
    > I put the jars upside down in it along with about an inch of water (holds
    > seven quart jars).


    "Big skillet on back burner that had me wondering". Also I thought jars
    that would be submerged in water would fit in a pot. I would fear that
    glass jars that come in contact with direct heat would shatter. I had a
    corning glass vision skillet that shattered because it had gotten too
    hot. The company no longer sells the glass cookware anymore for that
    reason. I also cook with propane which I believe has a hotter flame than
    natural gas.

    > If I could have my dream kitchen it would be to have a stove with more than
    > four burners or two stoves side by side. Canning would be a lot easier.


    We all dream of something better. Had I thought I would be canning ten
    years ago - I would have put in a bigger stove with venting also. I will
    live with what I have until large sums of money comes my way ... then I
    would not need to can ... catch 22 somewhere

    Enjoy Life ... Dan L

    --
    Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

  15. #15
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    Dan L. wrote:
    > In article <h8ptfu$hg0$[email protected]>,
    > "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Well, you said it's a really small canner. I honestly don't know. See, I
    >> have a weighted-gauge canner, so I have no way to know that the pressure is
    >> down to zero, other than the directions in the manual that tell me to wait
    >> 45 minutes to an hour before removing the weight and the lid. How do you
    >> know that it only takes 4-5 minutes in yours to reach zero pressure if you
    >> have a weighted-gauge one? Was that in the manual that came with it?

    >
    > My pressure canner has a weighted gauge and a pressure/temperature gauge.
    > It is not a dialed gauge canner.


    I'm a bit confused here, if you have a pressure/temperature gauge that
    is not dialed, how does it work? My background is many years in the
    hydrocarbon processing industry and every pressure/temperature gauge I
    ever saw was dialed and had one needle for pressure and another for
    temperature. Curious mind and all that.

    Thanks,

    >
    >>> One question - Why use a skillet when a pot will work better?

    >> Years ago, I had an electric skillet that I could set on the counter next to
    >> the stove and I would heat the jars that way. I actually liked not having
    >> to have one more thing on the stove. It also takes less water to do it that
    >> way. The end result is the same, though, that the jars get hot enough to
    >> not suffer thermal shock when I add boiling water to them, such as when I'm
    >> doing green beans. I'm not sure why you think the pot works better.

    >
    > Past post stated:
    >> When I'm doing pressure canning, I have my big skillet on a back burner and
    >> I put the jars upside down in it along with about an inch of water (holds
    >> seven quart jars).

    >
    > "Big skillet on back burner that had me wondering". Also I thought jars
    > that would be submerged in water would fit in a pot. I would fear that
    > glass jars that come in contact with direct heat would shatter. I had a
    > corning glass vision skillet that shattered because it had gotten too
    > hot. The company no longer sells the glass cookware anymore for that
    > reason. I also cook with propane which I believe has a hotter flame than
    > natural gas.
    >
    >> If I could have my dream kitchen it would be to have a stove with more than
    >> four burners or two stoves side by side. Canning would be a lot easier.

    >
    > We all dream of something better. Had I thought I would be canning ten
    > years ago - I would have put in a bigger stove with venting also. I will
    > live with what I have until large sums of money comes my way ... then I
    > would not need to can ... catch 22 somewhere
    >
    > Enjoy Life ... Dan L
    >


  16. #16
    Dan L. Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    smyrnaquince <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I have an old (50 years?) Mirro of the size you mention. It was sold
    > as a pressure cooker/canner. It has thick aluminum walls and my
    > family always used it for pressure canning. Now, though, I'm not sure
    > if I should use it because all the USDA recipes call for the larger
    > canners and say that the heat-up and cool-down (both of which are
    > untimed) constitute part of the canning process. The USDA does not
    > recommend use of the 8-quart pressure canner.
    >
    > Is anyone out there using one of these smaller canners?
    >
    > Dave
    >
    > On Sep 15, 12:42*am, zxcvbob <zxcv...@charter.net> wrote:
    > >
    > > Mirro makes a smaller one that holds 7 pint jars; I think it's 8 quart,
    > > and it's not tall enough to hold any quart jars. *HTH
    > >
    > > Bob


    I do not know about the USDA requirements. In the Ball Canning bible the
    cooking times are at a given pressure for an alloted time to kill off
    the bacteria. Are you sure the heat up and cool down times are a factor
    in the killing of the food born bacteria?

    Cooking longer times might change the taste or texture of the food. I
    thought the main goal of pressure cooking was to kill off the bad stuff.
    It would seem that once the temperature and pressure got up for the
    alloted time would be enough to do its job, regardless of the canners
    size.

    So the USDA is saying smaller pressure canners are bad?
    Do you have the article? It would be an interesting read.

    My canner is a 10.5 quart that holds 4 quart standard jars. So mine
    should be good to go. I really cannot imagine a canner smaller than mine.

    Enjoy Life ... Dan L

    --
    Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

  17. #17
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    "Dan L." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <h8ptfu$hg0$[email protected]>,
    > "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Well, you said it's a really small canner. I honestly don't know. See,
    >> I
    >> have a weighted-gauge canner, so I have no way to know that the pressure
    >> is
    >> down to zero, other than the directions in the manual that tell me to
    >> wait
    >> 45 minutes to an hour before removing the weight and the lid. How do you
    >> know that it only takes 4-5 minutes in yours to reach zero pressure if
    >> you
    >> have a weighted-gauge one? Was that in the manual that came with it?

    >
    > My pressure canner has a weighted gauge and a pressure/temperature gauge.
    > It is not a dialed gauge canner.
    >
    >> > One question - Why use a skillet when a pot will work better?

    >>
    >> Years ago, I had an electric skillet that I could set on the counter next
    >> to
    >> the stove and I would heat the jars that way. I actually liked not
    >> having
    >> to have one more thing on the stove. It also takes less water to do it
    >> that
    >> way. The end result is the same, though, that the jars get hot enough to
    >> not suffer thermal shock when I add boiling water to them, such as when
    >> I'm
    >> doing green beans. I'm not sure why you think the pot works better.

    >
    > Past post stated:
    >> When I'm doing pressure canning, I have my big skillet on a back burner
    >> and
    >> I put the jars upside down in it along with about an inch of water (holds
    >> seven quart jars).

    >
    > "Big skillet on back burner that had me wondering". Also I thought jars
    > that would be submerged in water would fit in a pot. I would fear that
    > glass jars that come in contact with direct heat would shatter. I had a
    > corning glass vision skillet that shattered because it had gotten too
    > hot. The company no longer sells the glass cookware anymore for that
    > reason. I also cook with propane which I believe has a hotter flame than
    > natural gas.


    Oh, my skillet is stainless steel. It has about an inch and a half of water
    in it. When the jars are put in it I turn the heat on to medium and let it
    start to boil, then I turn it down to a simmer. I've never had a jar break
    when I'm heating them this way and I've done it for probably close to 30
    years and I learned the technique from my mom-in-law. I've discarded a lot
    of the other canning techniques she used as newer and better methods have
    arisen, but this one doesn't have anything to do with the actual method of
    preservation, so I've kept it. By the way, I do have an electric range,
    currently, though once again, if I could have my dream kitchen, it would be
    a natural gas one.

    Right, those jars will fit in a pot, but as I said, the only pot with a
    diameter large enough to submerge them in water is my BWB canner. On my
    stove, I have two large and two small burners. Today I was canning green
    beans yet again, another 7 quarts. On the large back burner I heated the
    jars in the skillet. At the same time, I had my large saucepot full of
    water set to boil since you need boiling water to cover the green beans.
    The larger pots just don't work as well on the back of the stove because
    they actually touch the knobs. If they get hot enough while touching those
    plastic knobs, the knob starts to melt. Not a good idea. It's also hard to
    get to the knob to turn it off without burning your hand.

    I hate my stove, but it came with the house and was new when we moved in ten
    years ago. I won't be getting a new one until this one dies a slow and
    painful death.

    >> If I could have my dream kitchen it would be to have a stove with more
    >> than
    >> four burners or two stoves side by side. Canning would be a lot easier.

    >
    > We all dream of something better. Had I thought I would be canning ten
    > years ago - I would have put in a bigger stove with venting also. I will
    > live with what I have until large sums of money comes my way ... then I
    > would not need to can ... catch 22 somewhere


    I think that I will continue to can no matter what my economic situation is.
    I like to do it and I derive great satisfaction about seeing the fruits of
    my labors.



    --
    -Marilyn



  18. #18
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 22:37:57 -0700, "Marilyn"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >If I could have my dream kitchen it would be to have a stove with more than
    >four burners or two stoves side by side. Canning would be a lot easier.


    Marilyn,

    We have a commercial Garland range in our kitchen. 6 top burners, two
    large ovens, large grill and salamander. When we're canning we still
    wish for more. (That's in a good garden year, not in a crappy year
    like this one). So, when you're dreamin', might as well make your
    dream stove have more than 6 burners ;-).

    Ross.

  19. #19
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    In article <h8pafp$c95$[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > When I'm doing pressure canning, I have my big skillet on a back burner and
    > I put the jars upside down in it along with about an inch of water (holds
    > seven quart jars).


    :-) That's how I was taught, too, Marilyn.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  20. #20
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Size of pressure canner?

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Tue, 15 Sep 2009 22:37:57 -0700, "Marilyn"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>If I could have my dream kitchen it would be to have a stove with more
    >>than
    >>four burners or two stoves side by side. Canning would be a lot easier.

    >
    > Marilyn,
    >
    > We have a commercial Garland range in our kitchen. 6 top burners, two
    > large ovens, large grill and salamander. When we're canning we still
    > wish for more. (That's in a good garden year, not in a crappy year
    > like this one). So, when you're dreamin', might as well make your
    > dream stove have more than 6 burners ;-).
    >
    > Ross.


    That's what I said, the equivalent of two stoves, which would give me 8
    burners. I don't need a grille or another oven, just more burners for
    canning.



    --
    -Marilyn



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