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Thread: Sending full jars by mail

  1. #1
    Deidzoeb Guest

    Default Sending full jars by mail

    I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    and handling costs of that.

    I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.

    Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    Deidzoeb wrote:
    > I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    > websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    > goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    > and handling costs of that.
    >
    > I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    > I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    > padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    > the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    > laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    > will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >
    > Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >
    > Thanks!


    Several people on this group ship jars of jellies, jams, and relishes
    all over the US. Most of us wrap the individual jars in bubble wrap,
    including the top and bottom, fill in all the open spaces with either
    more bubble wrap of styrofoam (or better yet, the corn starch
    ones)peanuts. Wrap well, be sure the box is taped up with shipping tape,
    some label the box Fragile, some don't. I subscribe to the theory that
    if the box says "Fragile" the shipping apes at the shipping place will
    test the boxes to destruction if possible. I have sent and received
    boxes of full jars via the USPS and UPS without a problem to my
    knowledge. Never had a jar come open, going or coming but always leave
    the rings on just in case. YMMV

  3. #3
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Deidzoeb wrote:
    >> I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    >> websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    >> goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    >> and handling costs of that.
    >>
    >> I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    >> I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    >> padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    >> the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    >> laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    >> will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >>
    >> Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >>
    >> Thanks!

    >
    > Several people on this group ship jars of jellies, jams, and relishes all
    > over the US. Most of us wrap the individual jars in bubble wrap, including
    > the top and bottom, fill in all the open spaces with either more bubble
    > wrap of styrofoam (or better yet, the corn starch ones)peanuts. Wrap well,
    > be sure the box is taped up with shipping tape, some label the box
    > Fragile, some don't. I subscribe to the theory that if the box says
    > "Fragile" the shipping apes at the shipping place will test the boxes to
    > destruction if possible. I have sent and received boxes of full jars via
    > the USPS and UPS without a problem to my knowledge. Never had a jar come
    > open, going or coming but always leave the rings on just in case. YMMV


    Yep, I'm with George. Just make sure you wrap it carefully. When my
    daughter was in army basic training, she got injured. Now, this injury
    (pelvic stress fractures) did not prevent her from finishing basic. She's a
    determined kid and she just toughed it out as best she could so she would
    not get recycled and have to start over. Anyway, she graduated from basic,
    but was not deemed fit to proceed on to her advance course, so she they put
    her into the PTRP (Physical Training Rehabilation Program) unit, which is
    basically several months of physical therapy and rehab. She was allowed
    more privileges than you get in basic so I would send her goodie boxes every
    now and then. One of the things she liked best was when I sent her a jar of
    homemade salsa.

    I also have a son in Brazil on a church mission and in the last box I sent
    to him, I included a jar of homemade peach jam, along with a small
    commercial jar of peanut butter (they do not have peanut butter in Brazil).
    I made sure to cushion everything well with packaging peanuts. And yes, I
    either put a ring on the jar or I put a plastic screw cap on it in addition
    to the lid.



    --
    -Marilyn



  4. #4
    The Joneses Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:h93o6i$m15$[email protected]..
    > "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Deidzoeb wrote:
    >>> (clipped for brevity)
    >>> I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    >>> I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    >>> padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    >>> the lids from coming off. >>>
    >>> Thanks!

    >>
    >> Several people on this group ship jars of jellies, jams, and relishes all
    >> over the US. Most of us wrap the individual jars in bubble wrap,
    >> including
    >> the top and bottom, fill in all the open spaces with either more bubble
    >> wrap of styrofoam (or better yet, the corn starch ones)peanuts. Wrap
    >> well,
    >> be sure the box is taped up with shipping tape, some label the box
    >> Fragile, some don't. I subscribe to the theory that if the box says
    >> "Fragile" the shipping apes at the shipping place will test the boxes to
    >> destruction if possible. I have sent and received boxes of full jars via
    >> the USPS and UPS without a problem to my knowledge. Never had a jar come
    >> open, going or coming but always leave the rings on just in case. YMMV

    >
    > Yep, I'm with George. Just make sure you wrap it carefully.


    (I wished someone like you had shipped me goodies in basic. Good on you and
    her)

    > I also have a son in Brazil on a church mission and in the last box I sent
    > to him, I included a jar of homemade peach jam, along with a small
    > commercial jar of peanut butter (they do not have peanut butter in
    > Brazil).
    > I made sure to cushion everything well with packaging peanuts. And yes, I
    > either put a ring on the jar or I put a plastic screw cap on it in
    > addition
    > to the lid.
    > -Marilyn
    >

    What they all said.
    I've shipped stuff from Texas via US Postal Service to Israel and all over
    the US & the Philippines. Wrapped well in bubbles, identified on customs
    tags. Set in box rings side up, put label on top side. Usually did not mark
    fragile. Everything always arrived safe so far (God willin' and the creeks
    don't rise!).
    Chime in here Geoff, did any of my stuff arrive broke up?
    Edrena



  5. #5
    Gloria P Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    Deidzoeb wrote:
    > I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    > websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    > goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    > and handling costs of that.
    >
    > I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    > I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    > padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    > the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    > laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    > will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >
    > Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >
    > Thanks!



    Keep the outer rings on. If they are tight it won't matter if the box
    gets turned 90 degrees or even 180. Test by turning them on their sides
    on your counter before wrapping.

    Wrap each jar individually on all sides with bubble wrap as George said,
    and don't skimp on the amount.

    USE A LARGER BOX THAN YOU THINK YOU NEED.

    Pad the bottom, sides, and top of the box well and thickly, pad well
    between the wrapped jars so they don't move. "Padding" can be more
    bubble wrap, packing peanuts, or crushed newspaper. Just make sure it's
    packed in there tightly so nothing moves and the jars are held away from
    each other. Close the box without sealing it and shake it. If anything
    moves, add more padding.

    Seal well with wide packing tape. Seal the bottom of the box, too, even
    if it is glued shut already.

    Label clearly with a waterproof marker or use a mailing label. Put wide
    clear tape over the label or the writing.

    gloria p

  6. #6
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    In article <[email protected]>,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > (or better yet, the corn starch
    > ones)


    I worked in a shipping place during college and I can tell you those
    starch ones are the worst ones. They melt and dissolve if the package
    gets too wet, they mold, they attract bugs and rats. I can't tell you
    how often we'd get a bag of donated peanuts which was crawling with
    maggots. I wouldn't use them if you paid me.

    As for packing the jars, ditto on the bubble wrap, at least one inch
    between each jar in the box, two inches between the jars and the box,
    tightly packed with packing material. Tape every edge of the box, so it
    doesn't open up easily.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Deidzoeb <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    > websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    > goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    > and handling costs of that.
    >
    > I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    > I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    > padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    > the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    > laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    > will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >
    > Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >
    > Thanks!


    I have done it, regularly and frequently, although I mostly mail jams
    and jellies. I can put 12 half-pint jars in a USPS large flat rate box
    and send anywhere in the US for ~$14.

    I use the box and dividers that the empty jars were packed in.

    I wrap each jar in bubble wrap and put it into one of the 12 sections.
    The box just fits in the flat rate box where I have already put a layer
    of styro peanuts.

    I put more bubble wrap and styro peanuts at the long edges of the inner
    box and try to tuck a bit at the corners, too. I cover the top of the
    jars with old newspapers and top with more packing peanuts.

    I tape the box closed at all edges with clear packaging tape.

    I make yellow 3-5 2x3" labels that say "FRAGILE - contains liquid - JAM.
    I put one of those labels on top of the box and the others on a couple
    other sides. I use clear packaging tape to cover those labels and the
    address label.

    I take it to the post office, wait in line, and point to the bright
    yellow label when the postal clerk asks if I have any liquid,
    perishable, or hazardous material in the box. (Apparently, reading the
    labels I have plastered on the box is not enough; they must ask out
    loud.)

    Sometimes, *on the advice of one of the postal clerks,* I go through the
    self-service machine, answering 'no' to the same question in printed
    format on the screen. (If you have such material in your package, you
    are supposed to go through a real person to send it off.)

    You asked.

    I prefer to send the jars upright but have laid them on their sides in a
    box. If you have concern, place each jar in a Ziploc-type sealed bag.
    Be sure your jars have their screw rings in place.

    And I just re-read your post ‹ sorry. I see that you are concerned
    about the possibility/likelihood that the box will be booted around in
    transit like last night's underwear. There's no way to prevent that. I
    don't trust the "this side up" any further than I can throw the box.

    I pack as stated above and the *only* time I ever had a problem was
    before I started doing what I do above ‹ I had put plain jars in a box
    with a boatload of styro peanuts for cushioning, not thinking that the
    jars would move around within the peanuts. Okay, so I'm slow. I wrap
    each jar now in bubble wrap.

    The flat rate boxes are the bomb. I sent 5 or 6 jars in a smaller flat
    rate box, wrapping each in bubble wrap. I think I put them in divided
    sections using some of the dividers from an empty-jar box.

    I hope this has helped. VOE.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Gloria P <[email protected]> wrote:
    (G's good advice snipped)
    >
    > Seal well with wide packing tape. Seal the bottom of the box, too, even
    > if it is glued shut already.
    >
    > Label clearly with a waterproof marker or use a mailing label. Put wide
    > clear tape over the label or the writing.
    >
    > gloria p


    Hear, hear!!
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  9. #9
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 07:16:41 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article
    ><[email protected]>,
    > Deidzoeb <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    >> websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    >> goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    >> and handling costs of that.
    >>
    >> I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    >> I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    >> padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    >> the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    >> laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    >> will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >>
    >> Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >>
    >> Thanks!

    >
    >I have done it, regularly and frequently, although I mostly mail jams
    >and jellies. I can put 12 half-pint jars in a USPS large flat rate box
    >and send anywhere in the US for ~$14.
    >
    >I use the box and dividers that the empty jars were packed in.
    >
    >I wrap each jar in bubble wrap and put it into one of the 12 sections.
    >The box just fits in the flat rate box where I have already put a layer
    >of styro peanuts.
    >
    >I put more bubble wrap and styro peanuts at the long edges of the inner
    >box and try to tuck a bit at the corners, too. I cover the top of the
    >jars with old newspapers and top with more packing peanuts.
    >
    >I tape the box closed at all edges with clear packaging tape.
    >
    >I make yellow 3-5 2x3" labels that say "FRAGILE - contains liquid - JAM.
    >I put one of those labels on top of the box and the others on a couple
    >other sides. I use clear packaging tape to cover those labels and the
    >address label.


    Many years ago, I had a postie working part time for me at the shop.
    He always said that to postal employees, Fragile or Handle With Care
    labels simply meant Throw Underhand.

    Ross.

  10. #10
    Mimi Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    All good advice in this thread.

    My motto is: When mailing anything, send it the way you would want to
    receive it.

    I've sent jams/jellies all over the US and abroad, no problems.



  11. #11
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 07:16:41 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In article
    >> <[email protected]>,
    >> Deidzoeb <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    >>> websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    >>> goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    >>> and handling costs of that.
    >>>
    >>> I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    >>> I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    >>> padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    >>> the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    >>> laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    >>> will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >>>
    >>> Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >>>
    >>> Thanks!

    >> I have done it, regularly and frequently, although I mostly mail jams
    >> and jellies. I can put 12 half-pint jars in a USPS large flat rate box
    >> and send anywhere in the US for ~$14.
    >>
    >> I use the box and dividers that the empty jars were packed in.
    >>
    >> I wrap each jar in bubble wrap and put it into one of the 12 sections.
    >> The box just fits in the flat rate box where I have already put a layer
    >> of styro peanuts.
    >>
    >> I put more bubble wrap and styro peanuts at the long edges of the inner
    >> box and try to tuck a bit at the corners, too. I cover the top of the
    >> jars with old newspapers and top with more packing peanuts.
    >>
    >> I tape the box closed at all edges with clear packaging tape.
    >>
    >> I make yellow 3-5 2x3" labels that say "FRAGILE - contains liquid - JAM.
    >> I put one of those labels on top of the box and the others on a couple
    >> other sides. I use clear packaging tape to cover those labels and the
    >> address label.

    >
    > Many years ago, I had a postie working part time for me at the shop.
    > He always said that to postal employees, Fragile or Handle With Care
    > labels simply meant Throw Underhand.
    >
    > Ross.


    I have several friends locally that are current or retired postal
    workers. They say the same thing but only throw underhand if the
    supervisor is watching. Otherwise it's dribble and overhand.

  12. #12
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    Mimi wrote:
    > All good advice in this thread.
    >
    > My motto is: When mailing anything, send it the way you would want to
    > receive it.
    >
    > I've sent jams/jellies all over the US and abroad, no problems.
    >
    >



    And excellent jams and jellies they are too.

  13. #13
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 13:06:26 -0500, George Shirley
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >[email protected] wrote:
    >> On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 07:16:41 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article
    >>> <[email protected]>,
    >>> Deidzoeb <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    >>>> websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    >>>> goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    >>>> and handling costs of that.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    >>>> I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    >>>> padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    >>>> the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    >>>> laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    >>>> will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >>>>
    >>>> Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks!
    >>> I have done it, regularly and frequently, although I mostly mail jams
    >>> and jellies. I can put 12 half-pint jars in a USPS large flat rate box
    >>> and send anywhere in the US for ~$14.
    >>>
    >>> I use the box and dividers that the empty jars were packed in.
    >>>
    >>> I wrap each jar in bubble wrap and put it into one of the 12 sections.
    >>> The box just fits in the flat rate box where I have already put a layer
    >>> of styro peanuts.
    >>>
    >>> I put more bubble wrap and styro peanuts at the long edges of the inner
    >>> box and try to tuck a bit at the corners, too. I cover the top of the
    >>> jars with old newspapers and top with more packing peanuts.
    >>>
    >>> I tape the box closed at all edges with clear packaging tape.
    >>>
    >>> I make yellow 3-5 2x3" labels that say "FRAGILE - contains liquid - JAM.
    >>> I put one of those labels on top of the box and the others on a couple
    >>> other sides. I use clear packaging tape to cover those labels and the
    >>> address label.

    >>
    >> Many years ago, I had a postie working part time for me at the shop.
    >> He always said that to postal employees, Fragile or Handle With Care
    >> labels simply meant Throw Underhand.
    >>
    >> Ross.

    >
    >I have several friends locally that are current or retired postal
    >workers. They say the same thing but only throw underhand if the
    >supervisor is watching. Otherwise it's dribble and overhand.


    Right! I remember that part now ;-).
    It was over 30 years ago that Ron worked for me and, at my age, memory
    is not quite as sharp.

    Ross.

  14. #14
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:-vW[email protected]..
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> On Sun, 20 Sep 2009 07:16:41 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article
    >>> <[email protected]>,
    >>> Deidzoeb <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    >>>> websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    >>>> goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    >>>> and handling costs of that.
    >>>>
    >>>> I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    >>>> I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    >>>> padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    >>>> the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    >>>> laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    >>>> will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >>>>
    >>>> Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >>>>
    >>>> Thanks!
    >>> I have done it, regularly and frequently, although I mostly mail jams
    >>> and jellies. I can put 12 half-pint jars in a USPS large flat rate box
    >>> and send anywhere in the US for ~$14.
    >>> I use the box and dividers that the empty jars were packed in.
    >>> I wrap each jar in bubble wrap and put it into one of the 12 sections.
    >>> The box just fits in the flat rate box where I have already put a layer
    >>> of styro peanuts.
    >>> I put more bubble wrap and styro peanuts at the long edges of the inner
    >>> box and try to tuck a bit at the corners, too. I cover the top of the
    >>> jars with old newspapers and top with more packing peanuts.
    >>>
    >>> I tape the box closed at all edges with clear packaging tape.
    >>>
    >>> I make yellow 3-5 2x3" labels that say "FRAGILE - contains liquid -
    >>> JAM.
    >>> I put one of those labels on top of the box and the others on a couple
    >>> other sides. I use clear packaging tape to cover those labels and the
    >>> address label.

    >>
    >> Many years ago, I had a postie working part time for me at the shop.
    >> He always said that to postal employees, Fragile or Handle With Care
    >> labels simply meant Throw Underhand.
    >>
    >> Ross.

    >
    > I have several friends locally that are current or retired postal workers.
    > They say the same thing but only throw underhand if the supervisor is
    > watching. Otherwise it's dribble and overhand.



    The bad part is when you're sending internationally, you have to fill out
    the customs form with the exact contents and then they know what they want
    to rummage through and steal. Or if you decide not to fill out the form
    stating what's in the box, then they can open the box to see what's in it to
    rummage and steal. Your choice.

    Actually, as far as I know, none of the boxes I've sent to Brazil have been
    opened prior to my son receiving them. I've heard horror stories, though.

    --
    -Marilyn



  15. #15
    Deidzoeb Guest

    Default Re: Sending full jars by mail

    Thanks for all the tips! I'll use plenty of padding, so the jars won't
    break even if postal workers shoot free throws with them.


    On Sep 19, 5:58*pm, Deidzoeb <deidz...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > I've tried searching the web, this group, and various home canning
    > websites for info or advice about shipping FILLED jars of home canned
    > goods. But the only things I find are jars for sale, and the shipping
    > and handling costs of that.
    >
    > I'm planning to mail some half-pints of zucchini relish to relatives.
    > I know to write "FRAGILE - GLASS" on the outside and use enough
    > padding to keep the jars safe. Probably leaving the rings on will keep
    > the lids from coming off. But does it cause problems if the jars are
    > laid on their side during transit? I doubt that writing "THIS SIDE UP"
    > will guarantee that really stay that way during shipping.
    >
    > Have you ever shipped juicy items like this? Got any tips to share?
    >
    > Thanks!



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