Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Sealing jars

  1. #1
    AndyHancock Guest

    Default Sealing jars

    I looked for jars with sealed lids for storing coffee beans. I found
    them to be quite common-place (Walmart, Zellers, Loblaws). They have
    a rubbery seal around the rim of the lid, and a spring latch to exert
    pressure on the lid.

    Unfortunately, both the jars I got (different brands and stores) are
    not hermetically sealed. My apartment smells of the coffee that is
    stored in the "sealed" jar.

    Is the ineffectiveness of "sealed" jars very common? I do not relish
    the idea of doing an empirical saerch for an effective sealing jar.

  2. #2
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Sealing jars

    On Monday, October 1, 2012 7:22:07 AM UTC+1, AndyHancock wrote:
    > I looked for jars with sealed lids for storing coffee beans. I found
    >
    > them to be quite common-place (Walmart, Zellers, Loblaws). They have
    >
    > a rubbery seal around the rim of the lid, and a spring latch to exert
    >
    > pressure on the lid.
    >
    >
    >
    > Unfortunately, both the jars I got (different brands and stores) are
    >
    > not hermetically sealed. My apartment smells of the coffee that is
    >
    > stored in the "sealed" jar.
    >
    >
    >
    > Is the ineffectiveness of "sealed" jars very common? I do not relish
    >
    > the idea of doing an empirical saerch for an effective sealing jar.


    Place card on jar, lit from underneath. Run a ring of silicone sealant onto the card. Place polythene gently onto the silcone and smooth level. Once set, cut the card & silicone ring out.


    NT


  3. #3
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Sealing jars

    On Sun, 30 Sep 2012 23:22:07 -0700 (PDT), AndyHancock
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I looked for jars with sealed lids for storing coffee beans. I found
    >them to be quite common-place (Walmart, Zellers, Loblaws). They have
    >a rubbery seal around the rim of the lid, and a spring latch to exert
    >pressure on the lid.
    >
    >Unfortunately, both the jars I got (different brands and stores) are
    >not hermetically sealed. My apartment smells of the coffee that is
    >stored in the "sealed" jar.
    >
    >Is the ineffectiveness of "sealed" jars very common? I do not relish
    >the idea of doing an empirical saerch for an effective sealing jar.


    On roast day, I do two 1 pound batches in my Behmor 1600. After they
    have cooled I store the freshly roasted beans in standard Mason jars
    using the plastic storage lids.
    http://www.bernardin.ca/pages/produc.../47.php?pid=62
    I leave the lid slightly loose for a day or two to accommodate any
    gassing off, then I snug it down.
    Not as fancy as those upscale wire-bail type jars but there's also no
    coffee smell apparent until I open a jar to refill the grinder. Not
    that I'm averse to the smell of freshly roasted coffee mind you.

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada

  4. #4
    AndyHancock Guest

    Default Re: Sealing jars

    On Oct 1, 10:41*am, meow2...@care2.com wrote:
    > On Monday, October 1, 2012 7:22:07 AM UTC+1, AndyHancock wrote:
    > > I looked for jars with sealed lids for storing coffee beans. *I found

    >
    > > them to be quite common-place (Walmart, Zellers, Loblaws). *They have

    >
    > > a rubbery seal around the rim of the lid, and a spring latch to exert

    >
    > > pressure on the lid.

    >
    > > Unfortunately, both the jars I got (different brands and stores) are

    >
    > > not hermetically sealed. *My apartment smells of the coffee that is

    >
    > > stored in the "sealed" jar.

    >
    > > Is the ineffectiveness of "sealed" jars very common? *I do not relish

    >
    > > the idea of doing an empirical saerch for an effective sealing jar.

    >
    > Place card on jar, lit from underneath. Run a ring of silicone sealant onto the card. Place polythene gently onto the silcone and smooth level. Onceset, cut the card & silicone ring out.


    Sounds like its a method to seal a regular jar. My jars have a
    contoured rim to accommodate the built-in "seal", so it may less
    optimally for them. However, I'll keep in mind your do-it-yourself
    approach for regular jars (I don't have any at the moment). I was
    really hoping to avoid doing it myself, though.

  5. #5
    AndyHancock Guest

    Default Re: Sealing jars

    On Oct 1, 10:58*am, Ross@home wrote:
    > On Sun, 30 Sep 2012 23:22:07 -0700 (PDT), AndyHancock
    >
    > <andymhanc...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > >I looked for jars with sealed lids for storing coffee beans. *I found
    > >them to be quite common-place (Walmart, Zellers, Loblaws). *They have
    > >a rubbery seal around the rim of the lid, and a spring latch to exert
    > >pressure on the lid.

    >
    > >Unfortunately, both the jars I got (different brands and stores) are
    > >not hermetically sealed. *My apartment smells of the coffee that is
    > >stored in the "sealed" jar.

    >
    > >Is the ineffectiveness of "sealed" jars very common? *I do not relish
    > >the idea of doing an empirical saerch for an effective sealing jar.

    >
    > On roast day, I do two 1 pound batches in my Behmor 1600. After they
    > have cooled I store the freshly roasted beans in standard Mason jars
    > using the plastic storage lids.http://www.bernardin.ca/pages/produc.../47.php?pid=62
    > I leave the lid slightly loose for a day or two to accommodate any
    > gassing off, then I snug it down.
    > Not as fancy as those upscale wire-bail type jars but there's also no
    > coffee smell apparent until I open a jar to refill the grinder. Not
    > that I'm averse to the smell of freshly roasted coffee mind you.


    I don't mind the smell of coffee...I just don't like the idea of
    flavour leaving my beans and dissipating in to the atmosphere.

    I am not familiar with Mason jars, so I am surprised that a plastic
    lid forms a hermetic seal (given that the web page doesn't even claim
    to do so). However, customer testimony speaks loudly. Are mason jars
    threaded? Is that how you "snug it down"?

  6. #6
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Sealing jars

    On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 22:45:07 -0700 (PDT), AndyHancock
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Oct 1, 10:58*am, Ross@home wrote:
    >> On Sun, 30 Sep 2012 23:22:07 -0700 (PDT), AndyHancock
    >>
    >> <andymhanc...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> >I looked for jars with sealed lids for storing coffee beans. *I found
    >> >them to be quite common-place (Walmart, Zellers, Loblaws). *They have
    >> >a rubbery seal around the rim of the lid, and a spring latch to exert
    >> >pressure on the lid.

    >>
    >> >Unfortunately, both the jars I got (different brands and stores) are
    >> >not hermetically sealed. *My apartment smells of the coffee that is
    >> >stored in the "sealed" jar.

    >>
    >> >Is the ineffectiveness of "sealed" jars very common? *I do not relish
    >> >the idea of doing an empirical saerch for an effective sealing jar.

    >>
    >> On roast day, I do two 1 pound batches in my Behmor 1600. After they
    >> have cooled I store the freshly roasted beans in standard Mason jars
    >> using the plastic storage lids.http://www.bernardin.ca/pages/produc.../47.php?pid=62
    >> I leave the lid slightly loose for a day or two to accommodate any
    >> gassing off, then I snug it down.
    >> Not as fancy as those upscale wire-bail type jars but there's also no
    >> coffee smell apparent until I open a jar to refill the grinder. Not
    >> that I'm averse to the smell of freshly roasted coffee mind you.

    >
    >I don't mind the smell of coffee...I just don't like the idea of
    >flavour leaving my beans and dissipating in to the atmosphere.
    >
    >I am not familiar with Mason jars, so I am surprised that a plastic
    >lid forms a hermetic seal (given that the web page doesn't even claim
    >to do so). However, customer testimony speaks loudly. Are mason jars
    >threaded? Is that how you "snug it down"?


    Mason jars are the North American standard "canning" jars. They are
    available in standard and wide mouth styles. Plastic storage lids are
    available for both styles. These plastic lids are not used for
    processing, either by boiling water bath or pressure canning but are
    excellent for storage of dry items.

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada

  7. #7
    marierogen Guest

    Default Re: Sealing jars


    Ross@home;1774893 Wrote:
    > On Mon, 1 Oct 2012 22:45:07 -0700 (PDT), AndyHancock
    > [email protected] wrote:
    > -
    > On Oct 1, 10:58*am, Ross@home wrote:-
    > On Sun, 30 Sep 2012 23:22:07 -0700 (PDT), AndyHancock
    >
    > andymhanc...@gmail.com wrote:-
    > I looked for jars with sealed lids for storing coffee beans. *I found
    > them to be quite common-place (Walmart, Zellers, Loblaws). *They have
    > a rubbery seal around the rim of the lid, and a spring latch to exert
    > pressure on the lid.-
    > -
    > Unfortunately, both the jars I got (different brands and stores) are
    > not hermetically sealed. *My apartment smells of the coffee that is
    > stored in the "sealed" jar.-
    > -
    > Is the ineffectiveness of "sealed" jars very common? *I do not relish
    > the idea of doing an empirical saerch for an effective sealing jar.-
    >
    > On roast day, I do two 1 pound batches in my Behmor 1600. After they
    > have cooled I store the freshly roasted beans in standard Mason jars
    > using the plastic storage lids.'Bernardin Home Canning: Because You
    > Can' (http://www.bernardin.ca/pages/produc.../47.php?pid=62)
    > I leave the lid slightly loose for a day or two to accommodate any
    > gassing off, then I snug it down.
    > Not as fancy as those upscale wire-bail type jars but there's also no
    > coffee smell apparent until I open a jar to refill the grinder. Not
    > that I'm averse to the smell of freshly roasted coffee mind you.-
    >
    > I don't mind the smell of coffee...I just don't like the idea of
    > flavour leaving my beans and dissipating in to the atmosphere.
    >
    > I am not familiar with Mason jars, so I am surprised that a plastic
    > lid forms a hermetic seal (given that the web page doesn't even claim
    > to do so). However, customer testimony speaks loudly. Are mason jars
    > threaded? Is that how you "snug it down"?-
    >
    > Mason jars are the North American standard "canning" jars. They are
    > available in standard and wide mouth styles. Plastic storage lids are
    > available for both styles. These plastic lids are not used for
    > processing, either by boiling water bath or pressure canning but are
    > excellent for storage of dry items.
    >
    > Ross.
    > Southern Ontario, Canada


    hi .you can find the sealing jars in any place.But,sealing jars helps
    you to protect the food from harmful substance.




    --
    marierogen

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32