Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: Recipe & question

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Recipe & question

    Hi people

    I have a yum recipe that wasn't intended for canning:
    800g blackberries
    2 limes, juice of
    35g corn starch
    30g sugar
    - I'll cut down on starch & sugar next time.

    Could this be safely canned as is? Or how much citric would I need to add?


    NT

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On 9/15/2012 12:59 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > Hi people
    >
    > I have a yum recipe that wasn't intended for canning:
    > 800g blackberries
    > 2 limes, juice of
    > 35g corn starch
    > 30g sugar
    > - I'll cut down on starch & sugar next time.
    >
    > Could this be safely canned as is? Or how much citric would I need to add?
    >
    >
    > NT
    >

    What's the corn starch for, a thickener? And what is the use? If I were
    canning blackberries for making pies or cobblers I wouldn't add the corn
    starch until I need it for the dessert. I would think you would have
    enough acidity with the citrus juice and sugar to keep it properly
    without adding the citric acid. Preferably I would use lemon juice, one
    that is stable like the bottled juice which is set at a good pH for
    canning. You could then safely can them. So Easy to Preserve calls for a
    medium syrup for berries of any kind, that means 1 1/3 cup sugar to each
    quart of water to make your syrup then follow standard instructions for
    canning berries. The jars can then be processed in a boiling water bath,
    fifteen minutes for pints, twenty minutes for quarts.

    If you have So Easy to Preserve, check the instructions on page 38.

    George

  3. #3
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Saturday, September 15, 2012 7:53:56 PM UTC+1, George Shirley wrote:
    > On 9/15/2012 12:59 PM, meow2222 wrote:
    >
    > > Hi people

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I have a yum recipe that wasn't intended for canning:

    >
    > > 800g blackberries

    >
    > > 2 limes, juice of

    >
    > > 35g corn starch

    >
    > > 30g sugar

    >
    > > - I'll cut down on starch & sugar next time.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Could this be safely canned as is? Or how much citric would I need to add?

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > NT

    >
    > >

    >
    > What's the corn starch for, a thickener? And what is the use? If I were
    >
    > canning blackberries for making pies or cobblers I wouldn't add the corn
    >
    > starch until I need it for the dessert. I would think you would have
    >
    > enough acidity with the citrus juice and sugar to keep it properly
    >
    > without adding the citric acid. Preferably I would use lemon juice, one
    >
    > that is stable like the bottled juice which is set at a good pH for
    >
    > canning. You could then safely can them. So Easy to Preserve calls for a
    >
    > medium syrup for berries of any kind, that means 1 1/3 cup sugar to each
    >
    > quart of water to make your syrup then follow standard instructions for
    >
    > canning berries. The jars can then be processed in a boiling water bath,
    >
    > fifteen minutes for pints, twenty minutes for quarts.
    >
    >
    >
    > If you have So Easy to Preserve, check the instructions on page 38.
    >
    >
    >
    > George



    I think we may be misunderstanding each other. I've no use for canned blackberries in syrup, I'm looking to make a blackberry lime curd with little orno sugar. The question is whether its acid enough as is to keep in the jar.. It'll be BWB processed, no pressure cooking.


    NT

  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Saturday, September 15, 2012 8:55:24 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    > On Saturday, September 15, 2012 7:53:56 PM UTC+1, George Shirley wrote:
    >
    > > On 9/15/2012 12:59 PM, meow2222 wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Hi people

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > I have a yum recipe that wasn't intended for canning:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > 800g blackberries

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > 2 limes, juice of

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > 35g corn starch

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > 30g sugar

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > - I'll cut down on starch & sugar next time.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Could this be safely canned as is? Or how much citric would I need toadd?

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > NT

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > What's the corn starch for, a thickener? And what is the use? If I were

    >
    > >

    >
    > > canning blackberries for making pies or cobblers I wouldn't add the corn

    >
    > >

    >
    > > starch until I need it for the dessert. I would think you would have

    >
    > >

    >
    > > enough acidity with the citrus juice and sugar to keep it properly

    >
    > >

    >
    > > without adding the citric acid. Preferably I would use lemon juice, one

    >
    > >

    >
    > > that is stable like the bottled juice which is set at a good pH for

    >
    > >

    >
    > > canning. You could then safely can them. So Easy to Preserve calls for a

    >
    > >

    >
    > > medium syrup for berries of any kind, that means 1 1/3 cup sugar to each

    >
    > >

    >
    > > quart of water to make your syrup then follow standard instructions for

    >
    > >

    >
    > > canning berries. The jars can then be processed in a boiling water bath,

    >
    > >

    >
    > > fifteen minutes for pints, twenty minutes for quarts.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > If you have So Easy to Preserve, check the instructions on page 38.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > George

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > I think we may be misunderstanding each other. I've no use for canned blackberries in syrup, I'm looking to make a blackberry lime curd with little or no sugar. The question is whether its acid enough as is to keep in the jar. It'll be BWB processed, no pressure cooking.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > NT



    I'm thinking of pH testing before canning, and testing again at opening time before eating, for an initial batch. It seems paper strips would make more sense than an electronic meter. Would I need to aim for ph4.0, or would anything under 4.6 be fine? If its canned in 180ml jars, given that its a thick puree, how long would it need to be BWBed for?


    NT

  5. #5
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Sunday, September 16, 2012 9:26:47 AM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    > On Saturday, September 15, 2012 8:55:24 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    >
    > > On Saturday, September 15, 2012 7:53:56 PM UTC+1, George Shirley wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > On 9/15/2012 12:59 PM, meow2222 wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > Hi people

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > I have a yum recipe that wasn't intended for canning:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > 800g blackberries

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > 2 limes, juice of

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > 35g corn starch

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > 30g sugar

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > - I'll cut down on starch & sugar next time.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > Could this be safely canned as is? Or how much citric would I need to add?

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > NT

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > What's the corn starch for, a thickener? And what is the use? If I were

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > canning blackberries for making pies or cobblers I wouldn't add the corn

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > starch until I need it for the dessert. I would think you would have

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > enough acidity with the citrus juice and sugar to keep it properly

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > without adding the citric acid. Preferably I would use lemon juice, one

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > that is stable like the bottled juice which is set at a good pH for

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > canning. You could then safely can them. So Easy to Preserve calls for a

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > medium syrup for berries of any kind, that means 1 1/3 cup sugar to each

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > quart of water to make your syrup then follow standard instructions for

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > canning berries. The jars can then be processed in a boiling water bath,

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > fifteen minutes for pints, twenty minutes for quarts.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > If you have So Easy to Preserve, check the instructions on page 38.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > George

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I think we may be misunderstanding each other. I've no use for canned blackberries in syrup, I'm looking to make a blackberry lime curd with little or no sugar. The question is whether its acid enough as is to keep in thejar. It'll be BWB processed, no pressure cooking.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > NT

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > I'm thinking of pH testing before canning, and testing again at opening time before eating, for an initial batch. It seems paper strips would make more sense than an electronic meter. Would I need to aim for ph4.0, or wouldanything under 4.6 be fine? If its canned in 180ml jars, given that its a thick puree, how long would it need to be BWBed for?
    >
    >
    > NT



    It turns out red cabbage juice is a much better pH indicator in the 4/4.6 region than universal indicator

    Blackberries are normally in the 3.9-4.5 range, and lime juice pH 2. It alllooks good.


    NT

  6. #6
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Sunday, September 16, 2012 3:57:34 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    > On Sunday, September 16, 2012 9:26:47 AM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    >
    > > On Saturday, September 15, 2012 8:55:24 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > On Saturday, September 15, 2012 7:53:56 PM UTC+1, George Shirley wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > On 9/15/2012 12:59 PM, meow2222 wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > Hi people

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > I have a yum recipe that wasn't intended for canning:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > 800g blackberries

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > 2 limes, juice of

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > 35g corn starch

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > 30g sugar

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > - I'll cut down on starch & sugar next time.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > Could this be safely canned as is? Or how much citric would I need to add?

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > > NT

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > What's the corn starch for, a thickener? And what is the use? If I were

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > canning blackberries for making pies or cobblers I wouldn't add thecorn

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > starch until I need it for the dessert. I would think you would have

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > enough acidity with the citrus juice and sugar to keep it properly

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > without adding the citric acid. Preferably I would use lemon juice,one

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > that is stable like the bottled juice which is set at a good pH for

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > canning. You could then safely can them. So Easy to Preserve calls for a

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > medium syrup for berries of any kind, that means 1 1/3 cup sugar toeach

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > quart of water to make your syrup then follow standard instructionsfor

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > canning berries. The jars can then be processed in a boiling water bath,

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > fifteen minutes for pints, twenty minutes for quarts.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > If you have So Easy to Preserve, check the instructions on page 38.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > > George

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > I think we may be misunderstanding each other. I've no use for cannedblackberries in syrup, I'm looking to make a blackberry lime curd with little or no sugar. The question is whether its acid enough as is to keep in the jar. It'll be BWB processed, no pressure cooking.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > NT

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I'm thinking of pH testing before canning, and testing again at openingtime before eating, for an initial batch. It seems paper strips would makemore sense than an electronic meter. Would I need to aim for ph4.0, or would anything under 4.6 be fine? If its canned in 180ml jars, given that its a thick puree, how long would it need to be BWBed for?

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > NT

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > It turns out red cabbage juice is a much better pH indicator in the 4/4.6region than universal indicator
    >
    >
    >
    > Blackberries are normally in the 3.9-4.5 range, and lime juice pH 2. It all looks good.



    Blackberries 3.9 - 4.5
    Lemon juice 2.0 - 2.6 10%
    or Lime juice 2.0 - 2.4 10%
    Corn starch 5.9 - 7.3 3.75%

    Calculates to a total mixture pH of 2.95-3.55, well within the safe range.

    Have I missed anything?


    NT

  7. #7
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > Blackberries 3.9 - 4.5
    > Lemon juice 2.0 - 2.6 10%
    > or Lime juice 2.0 - 2.4 10%
    > Corn starch 5.9 - 7.3 3.75%
    >
    > Calculates to a total mixture pH of 2.95-3.55, well within the safe range.
    > Have I missed anything?
    >
    >
    > NT
    >



    The starch will break down. Your recipe should be safe to can, but it
    won't be good. Might work if you use Clear Gel instead of regular
    starch. Or just can the berries in light syrup and thicken them later.

    -Bob

  8. #8
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Monday, September 17, 2012 4:37:50 PM UTC+1, zxcvbob wrote:
    > meow2222 wrote:
    >
    > >

    >
    > > Blackberries 3.9 - 4.5

    >
    > > Lemon juice 2.0 - 2.6 10%

    >
    > > or Lime juice 2.0 - 2.4 10%

    >
    > > Corn starch 5.9 - 7.3 3.75%

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Calculates to a total mixture pH of 2.95-3.55, well within the safe range.

    >
    > > Have I missed anything?

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > NT

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > The starch will break down. Your recipe should be safe to can, but it
    >
    > won't be good. Might work if you use Clear Gel instead of regular
    >
    > starch. Or just can the berries in light syrup and thicken them later.
    >
    >
    >
    > -Bob


    Thank you, I'm now trying to find some modified starch.


    NT

  9. #9
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Monday, September 17, 2012 7:32:31 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    > On Monday, September 17, 2012 4:37:50 PM UTC+1, zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    > > meow2222 wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Blackberries 3.9 - 4.5

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Lemon juice 2.0 - 2.6 10%

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > or Lime juice 2.0 - 2.4 10%

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Corn starch 5.9 - 7.3 3.75%

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Calculates to a total mixture pH of 2.95-3.55, well within the safe range.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > Have I missed anything?

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > > NT

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > The starch will break down. Your recipe should be safe to can, but it

    >
    > >

    >
    > > won't be good. Might work if you use Clear Gel instead of regular

    >
    > >

    >
    > > starch. Or just can the berries in light syrup and thicken them later.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > -Bob

    >
    >
    >
    > Thank you, I'm now trying to find some modified starch.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > NT


    One question I forgot... when jars go in the BWB, are the lids loose with waer level just below the lid, or is it lids shut and fully submerged?

    thanks, NT

  10. #10
    Lawrence Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Mon, 17 Sep 2012 16:14:14 -0700 (PDT), [email protected] wrote:

    >One question I forgot... when jars go in the BWB, are the lids loose with waer level just below the lid, or is it lids shut and fully submerged?
    >
    >thanks, NT


    OMG! Your own untried recipe and not knowing the BASICS of a proper
    boiling water bath?

    STOP!
    FAIL!
    Go directly to Jail - Do NOT pass GO!

    (seal the lids, submerge and have at least one inch of boiling water above
    the lids - although I've no idea how long you should leave in the boiling
    water bath, nor whether you've got any chance of living through this
    experiment in Russian Roulette)

    This is NOT a good idea! STOP now before somebody gets hospitalized.


  11. #11
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 1:05:03 AM UTC+1, Lawrence wrote:
    > On Mon, 17 Sep 2012 16:14:14 -0700 (PDT), meow2222 wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >One question I forgot... when jars go in the BWB, are the lids loose with waer level just below the lid, or is it lids shut and fully submerged?

    >
    > >

    >
    > >thanks, NT

    >
    >
    >
    > OMG! Your own untried recipe and not knowing the BASICS of a proper
    >
    > boiling water bath?
    >
    >
    >
    > STOP!
    >
    > FAIL!
    >
    > Go directly to Jail - Do NOT pass GO!
    >
    >
    >
    > (seal the lids, submerge and have at least one inch of boiling water above
    >
    > the lids - although I've no idea how long you should leave in the boiling
    >
    > water bath, nor whether you've got any chance of living through this
    >
    > experiment in Russian Roulette)
    >
    >
    >
    > This is NOT a good idea! STOP now before somebody gets hospitalized.


    That's why I asked. The contents have a pH of 2.95-3.55, and is a puree so no lumps to aborb acid later. If you think I've missed something, please elaborate.


    NT

  12. #12
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 01:46:41 -0700 (PDT), [email protected] wrote:

    >On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 1:05:03 AM UTC+1, Lawrence wrote:
    >> On Mon, 17 Sep 2012 16:14:14 -0700 (PDT), meow2222 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> >One question I forgot... when jars go in the BWB, are the lids loose with waer level just below the lid, or is it lids shut and fully submerged?

    >>
    >> >

    >>
    >> >thanks, NT

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> OMG! Your own untried recipe and not knowing the BASICS of a proper
    >>
    >> boiling water bath?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> STOP!
    >>
    >> FAIL!
    >>
    >> Go directly to Jail - Do NOT pass GO!
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> (seal the lids, submerge and have at least one inch of boiling water above
    >>
    >> the lids - although I've no idea how long you should leave in the boiling
    >>
    >> water bath, nor whether you've got any chance of living through this
    >>
    >> experiment in Russian Roulette)
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> This is NOT a good idea! STOP now before somebody gets hospitalized.

    >
    >That's why I asked. The contents have a pH of 2.95-3.55, and is a puree so no lumps to aborb acid later. If you think I've missed something, please elaborate.
    >


    I've read portions of this thread and, before you venture any farther
    into home food preservation, I have one recommendation, go to
    http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html
    Learn the basics, start with General Information then branch out in
    your desired direction.

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada

  13. #13
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 2:30:14 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    > On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 01:46:41 -0700 (PDT), meow2222 wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 1:05:03 AM UTC+1, Lawrence wrote:

    >
    > >> On Mon, 17 Sep 2012 16:14:14 -0700 (PDT), meow2222 wrote:

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> >One question I forgot... when jars go in the BWB, are the lids loose with waer level just below the lid, or is it lids shut and fully submerged?

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> >

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> >thanks, NT

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> OMG! Your own untried recipe and not knowing the BASICS of a proper

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> boiling water bath?

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> STOP!

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> FAIL!

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Go directly to Jail - Do NOT pass GO!

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> (seal the lids, submerge and have at least one inch of boiling water above

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> the lids - although I've no idea how long you should leave in the boiling

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> water bath, nor whether you've got any chance of living through this

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> experiment in Russian Roulette)

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> This is NOT a good idea! STOP now before somebody gets hospitalized.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >That's why I asked. The contents have a pH of 2.95-3.55, and is a puree so no lumps to aborb acid later. If you think I've missed something, pleaseelaborate.

    >
    > >

    >
    >
    >
    > I've read portions of this thread and, before you venture any farther
    >
    > into home food preservation, I have one recommendation, go to
    >
    > http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html
    >
    > Learn the basics, start with General Information then branch out in
    >
    > your desired direction.
    >
    >
    >
    > Ross.
    >
    > Southern Ontario, Canada


    Done, cheers. Since the starch is an issue re water movement in the jar, atthe end of the day I really come back to what I thought initially, that its far less work to just freeze it. I can make and freeze the finished curd,whereas with canning I'd need to starch it point of use.

    Thanks everyone


    NT

  14. #14
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Wednesday, September 19, 2012 7:16:35 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    > On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 2:30:14 PM UTC+1, (unknown) wrote:
    >
    > > On Tue, 18 Sep 2012 01:46:41 -0700 (PDT), meow2222 wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >On Tuesday, September 18, 2012 1:05:03 AM UTC+1, Lawrence wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> On Mon, 17 Sep 2012 16:14:14 -0700 (PDT), meow2222 wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> >One question I forgot... when jars go in the BWB, are the lids loose with waer level just below the lid, or is it lids shut and fully submerged?

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> >thanks, NT

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> OMG! Your own untried recipe and not knowing the BASICS of a proper

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> boiling water bath?

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> STOP!

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> FAIL!

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> Go directly to Jail - Do NOT pass GO!

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> (seal the lids, submerge and have at least one inch of boiling waterabove

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> the lids - although I've no idea how long you should leave in the boiling

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> water bath, nor whether you've got any chance of living through this

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> experiment in Russian Roulette)

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >>

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >> This is NOT a good idea! STOP now before somebody gets hospitalized..

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >That's why I asked. The contents have a pH of 2.95-3.55, and is a puree so no lumps to aborb acid later. If you think I've missed something, please elaborate.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > I've read portions of this thread and, before you venture any farther

    >
    > >

    >
    > > into home food preservation, I have one recommendation, go to

    >
    > >

    >
    > > http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Learn the basics, start with General Information then branch out in

    >
    > >

    >
    > > your desired direction.

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Ross.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Southern Ontario, Canada

    >
    >
    >
    > Done, cheers. Since the starch is an issue re water movement in the jar, at the end of the day I really come back to what I thought initially, that its far less work to just freeze it. I can make and freeze the finished curd, whereas with canning I'd need to starch it point of use.
    >
    >
    >
    > Thanks everyone
    >


    ps the lemon curd recipe here
    http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_02/lemon_curd.html
    is miles away from what I'm looking for, and unsuitable. It also doesn't keep well.


    NT

  15. #15
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    In article <de2f5585[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > >
    > > >That's why I asked. The contents have a pH of 2.95-3.55, and is a puree so
    > > >no lumps to aborb acid later. If you think I've missed something, please
    > > >elaborate.

    > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > I've read portions of this thread and, before you venture any farther
    > >
    > > into home food preservation, I have one recommendation, go to
    > >
    > > http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html
    > >
    > > Learn the basics, start with General Information then branch out in
    > >
    > > your desired direction.
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Ross.
    > >
    > > Southern Ontario, Canada

    >
    > Done, cheers. Since the starch is an issue re water movement in the jar, at
    > the end of the day I really come back to what I thought initially, that its
    > far less work to just freeze it. I can make and freeze the finished curd,
    > whereas with canning I'd need to starch it point of use.
    >
    > Thanks everyone
    >
    >
    > NT


    Coming late to this party, but with all you're saying you do not want,
    is your goal more akin to a fruit butter? If so, that's a matter of
    fruit pulp (seeds removed), thickened by evaporation, sweetened and
    spiced if you wish. I do it with apricots, plums, apples. I've not
    done berries only because the idea of a berry 'butter' is foreign to me
    and not particularly appealing. If you're not familiar with them or
    how to make them, I have some information here:
    http://www.barbschaller.com/I_Can_Ca...ntries/2011/7/
    1_Apricot_Butter.html

    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

  16. #16
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    On Monday, September 24, 2012 12:09:03 AM UTC+1, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    >
    > meow2222 wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > >That's why I asked. The contents have a pH of 2.95-3.55, and is a puree so

    >
    > > > >no lumps to aborb acid later. If you think I've missed something, please

    >
    > > > >elaborate.

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > I've read portions of this thread and, before you venture any farther

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > into home food preservation, I have one recommendation, go to

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > Learn the basics, start with General Information then branch out in

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > your desired direction.

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > Ross.

    >
    > > >

    >
    > > > Southern Ontario, Canada

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Done, cheers. Since the starch is an issue re water movement in the jar, at

    >
    > > the end of the day I really come back to what I thought initially, thatits

    >
    > > far less work to just freeze it. I can make and freeze the finished curd,

    >
    > > whereas with canning I'd need to starch it point of use.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Thanks everyone

    >
    > >

    >
    > >

    >
    > > NT

    >
    >
    >
    > Coming late to this party, but with all you're saying you do not want,
    >
    > is your goal more akin to a fruit butter? If so, that's a matter of
    >
    > fruit pulp (seeds removed), thickened by evaporation, sweetened and
    >
    > spiced if you wish. I do it with apricots, plums, apples. I've not
    >
    > done berries only because the idea of a berry 'butter' is foreign to me
    >
    > and not particularly appealing. If you're not familiar with them or
    >
    > how to make them, I have some information here:
    >
    > http://www.barbschaller.com/I_Can_Ca...ntries/2011/7/
    > 1_Apricot_Butter.html



    Thanks, interesting idea. What I made is a curd of sorts, but not like a traditional one. Its more dilute in flavour, mostly berry and less citrus, and thickened with starch to make it far healthier. A good use is with apple for tarts, the cooked apple & curd are spooned in alternately and the case in its container is banged down gently to level it all. It makes a very pretty and tasty tart.

    Time was tight, and I had neither the right starch to do it in small jars as wanted, nor the right bwb to do quarts of fruit without starch, so I froze it this time. I'm on the hunt for a bigger bwb, but no joy in town.

    I can't imagine your fruit butter working with blackberries, they're very high in water. It would surely take all day to cook them down to a fraction the original amount.

    This is what I used for the freezer batch:
    2.4kg blackberries
    6 limes
    150g custard powder (apx 50% starch, 50% sugar, flavour)

    Simmer berries & lime juice for 15 mins. Stir in powder mixed with a littlewater. Heat on low-medium flame for a couple of minutes, stirring almost constantly, it can burn once the starch is added.


    NT

  17. #17
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Recipe & question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > On Monday, September 24, 2012 12:09:03 AM UTC+1, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >
    > > meow2222 wrote:
    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > >That's why I asked. The contents have a pH of 2.95-3.55, and is a
    > > > > >puree so

    > >
    > > > > >no lumps to aborb acid later. If you think I've missed something,
    > > > > >please

    > >
    > > > > >elaborate.

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > >

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > I've read portions of this thread and, before you venture any farther

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > into home food preservation, I have one recommendation, go to

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > http://nchfp.uga.edu/how/can_home.html

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > Learn the basics, start with General Information then branch out in

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > your desired direction.

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > Ross.

    > >
    > > > >

    > >
    > > > > Southern Ontario, Canada

    > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > > Done, cheers. Since the starch is an issue re water movement in the jar,
    > > > at

    > >
    > > > the end of the day I really come back to what I thought initially, that
    > > > its

    > >
    > > > far less work to just freeze it. I can make and freeze the finished curd,

    > >
    > > > whereas with canning I'd need to starch it point of use.

    > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > > Thanks everyone

    > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > >

    > >
    > > > NT

    > >
    > >
    > >
    > > Coming late to this party, but with all you're saying you do not want,
    > >
    > > is your goal more akin to a fruit butter? If so, that's a matter of
    > >
    > > fruit pulp (seeds removed), thickened by evaporation, sweetened and
    > >
    > > spiced if you wish. I do it with apricots, plums, apples. I've not
    > >
    > > done berries only because the idea of a berry 'butter' is foreign to me
    > >
    > > and not particularly appealing. If you're not familiar with them or
    > >
    > > how to make them, I have some information here:
    > >
    > > http://www.barbschaller.com/I_Can_Ca...ntries/2011/7/
    > > 1_Apricot_Butter.html

    >
    >
    > Thanks, interesting idea. What I made is a curd of sorts, but not like a
    > traditional one. Its more dilute in flavour, mostly berry and less citrus,
    > and thickened with starch to make it far healthier. A good use is with apple
    > for tarts, the cooked apple & curd are spooned in alternately and the case in
    > its container is banged down gently to level it all. It makes a very pretty
    > and tasty tart.
    >
    > Time was tight, and I had neither the right starch to do it in small jars as
    > wanted, nor the right bwb to do quarts of fruit without starch, so I froze it
    > this time. I'm on the hunt for a bigger bwb, but no joy in town.
    >
    > I can't imagine your fruit butter working with blackberries, they're very
    > high in water.


    Which is why I like my method for preparing the fruit before milling it
    to remove the seeds.

    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of August 20, 2012

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32