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Thread: Question about those "Atlas" jars

  1. #1
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Question about those "Atlas" jars

    I've gotten to the point where I don't like to use jars that are not
    specifically marketed for canning, but the jars that the Classico brand of
    spaghetti sauce comes in are labeled as Atlas mason jars. Now, I know that
    once upon a time, there were Atlas jars that were told for home canning, but
    I'm told that the jars the spaghetti sauce comes in are not exactly the same
    and that they are thinner. Some people say they use them, others say that
    they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a high
    rate of seal failure and breakage.

    I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?

    National Center for Home Food Preservation says you can use commercial jars
    for acid foods, i.e., those you BWB, but expect that they might not seal
    properly or the jars might break.

    I'm asking this because well-meaning coworkers of my husband keep bringing
    him the jars because they know I can and I have told him that I don't want
    jars unless they are "real" canning jars, but they want a detailed
    explanation. I already gave them the info from the NCHFP, word for word. I
    don't want to sound like an ingrate, but honestly, I invest too much time
    and energy into canning to have things fail because the jars weren't good.

    --
    -Marilyn



  2. #2
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    Marilyn wrote:
    > I've gotten to the point where I don't like to use jars that are not
    > specifically marketed for canning, but the jars that the Classico brand of
    > spaghetti sauce comes in are labeled as Atlas mason jars. Now, I know that
    > once upon a time, there were Atlas jars that were told for home canning, but
    > I'm told that the jars the spaghetti sauce comes in are not exactly the same
    > and that they are thinner. Some people say they use them, others say that
    > they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a high
    > rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >
    > I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?
    >
    > National Center for Home Food Preservation says you can use commercial jars
    > for acid foods, i.e., those you BWB, but expect that they might not seal
    > properly or the jars might break.
    >
    > I'm asking this because well-meaning coworkers of my husband keep bringing
    > him the jars because they know I can and I have told him that I don't want
    > jars unless they are "real" canning jars, but they want a detailed
    > explanation. I already gave them the info from the NCHFP, word for word. I
    > don't want to sound like an ingrate, but honestly, I invest too much time
    > and energy into canning to have things fail because the jars weren't good.
    >



    My brother and my parents use "Atlas" spaghetti sauce jars all the time
    for canning; they are just the right size (quarts are too big, pints are
    too small.) I have one or two around here somewhere from green beans or
    tomatoes that they gave me, and I believe they are just as thick as
    regular Ball or Kerr canning jars. They are certainly thicker than the
    glass in mayonnaise jars (and I used to can with those without ever
    breaking one or losing a seal.)

    They are a nonstandard size, so you'd use the processing timetables for
    the next larger size jar (quarts) and risk overcooking the food a little.

    Bob


  3. #3
    Dave Balderstone Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    In article <hb87d4$jcr$[email protected]>, Marilyn
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?


    I use them for pickles and tomato sauce, et al, and haven't had a
    problem with seals or breakage.

    I don't do a lot of pressure canning, and haven't used them there.

  4. #4
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    Marilyn wrote:
    > I've gotten to the point where I don't like to use jars that are not
    > specifically marketed for canning, but the jars that the Classico brand of
    > spaghetti sauce comes in are labeled as Atlas mason jars. Now, I know that
    > once upon a time, there were Atlas jars that were told for home canning, but
    > I'm told that the jars the spaghetti sauce comes in are not exactly the same
    > and that they are thinner. Some people say they use them, others say that
    > they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a high
    > rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >
    > I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?
    >
    > National Center for Home Food Preservation says you can use commercial jars
    > for acid foods, i.e., those you BWB, but expect that they might not seal
    > properly or the jars might break.
    >
    > I'm asking this because well-meaning coworkers of my husband keep bringing
    > him the jars because they know I can and I have told him that I don't want
    > jars unless they are "real" canning jars, but they want a detailed
    > explanation. I already gave them the info from the NCHFP, word for word. I
    > don't want to sound like an ingrate, but honestly, I invest too much time
    > and energy into canning to have things fail because the jars weren't good.
    >

    I have used the Classico jars with good success in both BWB and pressure
    canners. As near as I can determine they are genuine canning jars and
    even take the two piece lid and ring perfectly. Can't say that about the
    rest of the sauce jars, they seem much thinner and don't have the same
    lip so I don't use them. The Classico jars are 26 ounce versus 32 ounce
    though.

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    In article <hb87d4$jcr$[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > and that they are thinner. Some people say they use them, others say that
    > they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a high
    > rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >
    > I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?


    I wouldn't hesitate to use them for BWB processing; don't know what to
    say about pressure canning.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  6. #6
    Kathi Jones Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars


    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hb87d4$jcr$[email protected]..
    > I've gotten to the point where I don't like to use jars that are not
    > specifically marketed for canning, but the jars that the Classico brand of
    > spaghetti sauce comes in are labeled as Atlas mason jars. Now, I know
    > that
    > once upon a time, there were Atlas jars that were told for home canning,
    > but
    > I'm told that the jars the spaghetti sauce comes in are not exactly the
    > same
    > and that they are thinner. Some people say they use them, others say that
    > they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a
    > high
    > rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >
    > I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?
    >
    > National Center for Home Food Preservation says you can use commercial
    > jars
    > for acid foods, i.e., those you BWB, but expect that they might not seal
    > properly or the jars might break.
    >
    > I'm asking this because well-meaning coworkers of my husband keep bringing
    > him the jars because they know I can and I have told him that I don't want
    > jars unless they are "real" canning jars, but they want a detailed
    > explanation. I already gave them the info from the NCHFP, word for word.
    > I
    > don't want to sound like an ingrate, but honestly, I invest too much time
    > and energy into canning to have things fail because the jars weren't good.


    I use them. I also use the jars that you find Rene's salad dressings in.
    355 ml - smooth sides. Pretty for pickled asparagus, green beans, other
    pickles, carrots, salsa - I have used them for all of these recipes. BWB
    only, no idea how they would be under pressure. The plastic lids that they
    come with fit perfectly oin a standard canning jar and visa versa. Never
    had a problem with sealing.

    FWIW
    Kathi


    >
    > --
    > -Marilyn
    >
    >




  7. #7
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 22:23:34 -0000, "Marilyn"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I've gotten to the point where I don't like to use jars that are not
    >specifically marketed for canning, but the jars that the Classico brand of
    >spaghetti sauce comes in are labeled as Atlas mason jars. Now, I know that
    >once upon a time, there were Atlas jars that were told for home canning, but
    >I'm told that the jars the spaghetti sauce comes in are not exactly the same
    >and that they are thinner. Some people say they use them, others say that
    >they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a high
    >rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >
    >I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?
    >
    >National Center for Home Food Preservation says you can use commercial jars
    >for acid foods, i.e., those you BWB, but expect that they might not seal
    >properly or the jars might break.
    >
    >I'm asking this because well-meaning coworkers of my husband keep bringing
    >him the jars because they know I can and I have told him that I don't want
    >jars unless they are "real" canning jars, but they want a detailed
    >explanation. I already gave them the info from the NCHFP, word for word. I
    >don't want to sound like an ingrate, but honestly, I invest too much time
    >and energy into canning to have things fail because the jars weren't good.


    I'm a little late getting to the newsgroups today but, like others
    have said, we use quite a few of the Classico sauce jars for canning
    tomatoes in a BWB. Have yet to have a problem.
    We bought a bunch of the Classico sauces at a local liquidation outlet
    at about $0.50 a jar. But, to tell the truth, I'd much prefer to get
    the empty jars from someone's co-worker rather than use that sauce on
    my food just to get jars.

    Ross.

  8. #8
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 22:23:34 -0000, "Marilyn"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I've gotten to the point where I don't like to use jars that are not
    >>specifically marketed for canning, but the jars that the Classico brand of
    >>spaghetti sauce comes in are labeled as Atlas mason jars. Now, I know
    >>that
    >>once upon a time, there were Atlas jars that were told for home canning,
    >>but
    >>I'm told that the jars the spaghetti sauce comes in are not exactly the
    >>same
    >>and that they are thinner. Some people say they use them, others say that
    >>they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a
    >>high
    >>rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >>
    >>I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?
    >>
    >>National Center for Home Food Preservation says you can use commercial
    >>jars
    >>for acid foods, i.e., those you BWB, but expect that they might not seal
    >>properly or the jars might break.
    >>
    >>I'm asking this because well-meaning coworkers of my husband keep bringing
    >>him the jars because they know I can and I have told him that I don't want
    >>jars unless they are "real" canning jars, but they want a detailed
    >>explanation. I already gave them the info from the NCHFP, word for word.
    >>I
    >>don't want to sound like an ingrate, but honestly, I invest too much time
    >>and energy into canning to have things fail because the jars weren't good.

    >
    > I'm a little late getting to the newsgroups today but, like others
    > have said, we use quite a few of the Classico sauce jars for canning
    > tomatoes in a BWB. Have yet to have a problem.
    > We bought a bunch of the Classico sauces at a local liquidation outlet
    > at about $0.50 a jar. But, to tell the truth, I'd much prefer to get
    > the empty jars from someone's co-worker rather than use that sauce on
    > my food just to get jars.
    >
    > Ross.



    Hmm. So I'm debating here about taking them now. I really don't need the
    extra jars and I don't like that they're not a quart size. I have used them
    on occasion myself in the past. And no, I'd never buy that brand of
    spaghetti sauce. I buy the cheapest, which is usually Del Monte, in a can,
    not a jar and then only use it as a base for my own ingredients. I'll think
    about it this weekend and maybe I will take the jars.

    --
    -Marilyn



  9. #9
    Ranée at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    In article <hbah9u$oft$[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hmm. So I'm debating here about taking them now. I really don't need the
    > extra jars and I don't like that they're not a quart size. I have used them
    > on occasion myself in the past. And no, I'd never buy that brand of
    > spaghetti sauce. I buy the cheapest, which is usually Del Monte, in a can,
    > not a jar and then only use it as a base for my own ingredients. I'll think
    > about it this weekend and maybe I will take the jars.


    I've used these jars, and I like the size. It would thrill me if I
    could get them without having to get the sauce. We make our own sauce
    or use TJ's marinara.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  10. #10
    frater mus Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 22:23:34 +0000, Marilyn wrote:

    > Some people say
    > they use them, others say that they are not made to be reused over and
    > over again and that they have a high rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >
    > I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?


    I'd use them for PC/BWB but I dislike the size and shape of the jars. I
    have one hanging around that I haven't recycled yet. I do keep the screw-
    on lids to use to reclose mason jars in the fridge, etc.



    --
    L.V.X., brother mouse

  11. #11
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    "frater mus" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hbdi67$dll$[email protected]..
    > On Thu, 15 Oct 2009 22:23:34 +0000, Marilyn wrote:
    >
    >> Some people say
    >> they use them, others say that they are not made to be reused over and
    >> over again and that they have a high rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >>
    >> I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?

    >
    > I'd use them for PC/BWB but I dislike the size and shape of the jars. I
    > have one hanging around that I haven't recycled yet. I do keep the screw-
    > on lids to use to reclose mason jars in the fridge, etc.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > L.V.X., brother mouse



    Yes, the squareness is a bit of an annoyance isn't it? Probably not so much
    in a BWB but in a pressure canner where they're close together, I could see
    maybe having a problem. Of course, the squareness is an asset when storing
    them on the shelf because there's less wasted space.

    --
    -Marilyn



  12. #12
    Mimi Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    I've only used the bigger ones for storage & iced coffee. (shaken, not
    stirred)

    : - )

    Now, Classico does sell a pesto sauce in a smaller jar--we use it as a
    base with white sauce on pizza because I can't eat tomatoes. I have
    re-used those little jars for jams, jellies & butters in a BWB--no
    problems with breakage or sealing. I haven't had a issue with the
    shape of the jar because I usually do small batches and they fit okay
    in my granite BWB canner.

    HTH

  13. #13
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    Mimi wrote:
    > I've only used the bigger ones for storage & iced coffee. (shaken, not
    > stirred)
    >
    > : - )
    >
    > Now, Classico does sell a pesto sauce in a smaller jar--we use it as a
    > base with white sauce on pizza because I can't eat tomatoes. I have
    > re-used those little jars for jams, jellies & butters in a BWB--no
    > problems with breakage or sealing. I haven't had a issue with the
    > shape of the jar because I usually do small batches and they fit okay
    > in my granite BWB canner.
    >
    > HTH


    I was in the local Kroger yesterday and walked by the sauce display, the
    Classico jars for spaghetti sauce have been downsized, they're now 24
    ounce versus the former 26 ounce. Still marked Atlas Mason though. I
    have no fear of putting them in the pressure canner, did a bunch of
    green beans in them as that size jar makes a perfect serving for two
    with a little leftover to add to the potential soup container in the
    freezer.

    Got up to 53F this morning, may be time for either chili or soup, I'm
    voting for chili.

  14. #14
    Mimi Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    <snip> Got up to 53F this morning, may be time for either chili or
    soup, I'm voting for chili. <snip>

    Chicken soup or Chicken Gumbo weather for me...

    : - )


  15. #15
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    Mimi wrote:
    > <snip> Got up to 53F this morning, may be time for either chili or
    > soup, I'm voting for chili. <snip>
    >
    > Chicken soup or Chicken Gumbo weather for me...
    >
    > : - )
    >

    Red beans for supper last night, made with diced andouille sausage,
    fried to render the grease, then added to simmering beans. Also put in
    half a dozen chopped green onions, and a couple of small sweet chiles,
    diced. Looked in the freezer and there was a small package of ham bits,
    chopped them a bit more and added to the pot. Had a pot of brown rice
    cooking.

    DW came home from work and walked in the house and started slobbering
    all over the place, between she and the dog I thought I might have to
    mop the floors. It was right tasty, will freeze the leftovers for
    another time.

    I have four lbs of ground chuck thawing to make a pot of chili and now
    it's starting to warm up again. Oh well, another cold front is on the
    way so it will be just about cool enough when I make the chili.

    Also thawing a lb of thick cut bacon, will fry it up, drain well, put
    the slices between sheets of wax paper and then freeze it again for DW
    to have for her breakfast as wanted. Also made a dozen whole berry
    cranberry sauce muffins with walnuts for her morning delight.

    She stopped by the thrift store yesterday and found three of those
    little round half pint canning jars for 25 cents a piece, they're in the
    dishwasher now.

  16. #16
    Mimi Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    Just got home from Wally World. There was one jar of the Classico
    basil pesto (on the shelf) that was a lug type jar--not a re-useable
    jar for canning--but still embossed 'Atlas Mason'. The label was the
    same except that it was 8.1 ounces (of product). The rest on the shelf
    were the regular mason type closure--10 ounces. I hope they aren't
    going to the lug-style--my Hun Bun really likes the pesto and to me,
    the jar is a bonus.

    : - )


  17. #17
    jimnginger Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    On Oct 15, 2:23*pm, "Marilyn" <return.to.sen...@address.unknown.net>
    wrote:
    > I've gotten to the point where I don't like to use jars that are not
    > specifically marketed for canning, but the jars that the Classico brand of
    > spaghetti sauce comes in are labeled as Atlas mason jars. *Now, I know that
    > once upon a time, there were Atlas jars that were told for home canning, but
    > I'm told that the jars the spaghetti sauce comes in are not exactly the same
    > and that they are thinner. *Some people say they use them, others say that
    > they are not made to be reused over and over again and that they have a high
    > rate of seal failure and breakage.
    >
    > I prefer not to, but what's the consensus here?
    >
    > National Center for Home Food Preservation says you can use commercial jars
    > for acid foods, i.e., those you BWB, but expect that they might not seal
    > properly or the jars might break.
    >
    > I'm asking this because well-meaning coworkers of my husband keep bringing
    > him the jars because they know I can and I have told him that I don't want
    > jars unless they are "real" canning jars, but they want a detailed
    > explanation. *I already gave them the info from the NCHFP, word for word. *I
    > don't want to sound like an ingrate, but honestly, I invest too much time
    > and energy into canning to have things fail because the jars weren't good..
    >
    > --
    > -Marilyn


    I have always used the Classico jars and love the 24 ounce size. It is
    great for soups and fruits. Ball/Kerr used to make 24 ounce canning
    jars but no more.
    With respect to BWB or PC, I use them for both without any
    distinction. I have NEVER had one of them break.
    For the folks who say they are lighter glass, put on on a cooking or
    postal scale with a Kerr or a Ball. I have done so and the Classico
    was the heavier of the 3.
    That little 10 ounce pesto bottle from Classico is a jewel. Wish I
    could get my neighbors to save them for me.
    Jim in So. Calif.

  18. #18
    Tomct is offline Assistant Cook
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Meriden, CT
    Posts
    1

    Default

    It's been awhile since anyone posted on this subject, but last night I was canning some tomatoes, and when it was time to take the jars out of the water bath, I noticed a piece of tomato floating on the top of the water. I thought nothing of it, just that I had somehow dropped a piece in there, but as I was removing the first jar, the top 2/3 of one of the jars broke away from the bottom. What a mess it made in the water! Today I noticed that the jar was an Atlas Mason jar, and since all our other jars are Ball jars, I googled Altas Mason Jars and found this site.

    Though I haven't had a chance to look around, I thought I'd update the thread, and provide a "living example" of why maybe it's not such a good idea to use these jars. I'm guessing it somehow made it's way from a jar of spaghetti to our jar storage, bypassing what should have been the recycling bin!!

  19. #19
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    On Fri, 21 Sep 2012 09:27:40 -0500, Tomct
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >It's been awhile since anyone posted on this subject, but last night I
    >was canning some tomatoes, and when it was time to take the jars out of
    >the water bath, I noticed a piece of tomato floating on the top of the
    >water. I thought nothing of it, just that I had somehow dropped a piece
    >in there, but as I was removing the first jar, the top 2/3 of one of the
    >jars broke away from the bottom. What a mess it made in the water!
    >Today I noticed that the jar was an Atlas Mason jar, and since all our
    >other jars are Ball jars, I googled Altas Mason Jars and found this
    >site.
    >
    >Though I haven't had a chance to look around, I thought I'd update the
    >thread, and provide a "living example" of why maybe it's not such a good
    >idea to use these jars. I'm guessing it somehow made it's way from a
    >jar of spaghetti to our jar storage, bypassing what should have been the
    >recycling bin!!


    I see I was one of the guest responders in your linked thread on this
    subject, back on Oct. 16, 2009 (different ISP at that time).
    I would venture an educated guess that since that time we have BWB'd
    well over 200 jars of tomatoes in Atlas (Classico) jars.
    As a matter of fact, I just took a break from doing tomatoes this
    morning to read the NG while one load is in the canner. This is pretty
    well the end the year's tomato crop but, by the time we finish later
    today this season's total alone will be over 50 of the Atlas jars plus
    more than 20 quart (or liter) jars.
    Never had a jar break and seal failures would be less than 1%.
    For the two of us, Atlas jars are the perfect size.
    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada

  20. #20
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Question about those "Atlas" jars

    On 9/21/2012 9:27 AM, Tomct wrote:
    > It's been awhile since anyone posted on this subject, but last night I
    > was canning some tomatoes, and when it was time to take the jars out of
    > the water bath, I noticed a piece of tomato floating on the top of the
    > water. I thought nothing of it, just that I had somehow dropped a piece
    > in there, but as I was removing the first jar, the top 2/3 of one of the
    > jars broke away from the bottom. What a mess it made in the water!
    > Today I noticed that the jar was an Atlas Mason jar, and since all our
    > other jars are Ball jars, I googled Altas Mason Jars and found this
    > site.
    >
    > Though I haven't had a chance to look around, I thought I'd update the
    > thread, and provide a "living example" of why maybe it's not such a good
    > idea to use these jars. I'm guessing it somehow made it's way from a
    > jar of spaghetti to our jar storage, bypassing what should have been the
    > recycling bin!!
    >
    >

    I've used the Atlas Mason 26 ounce jars for several years with good
    results. They were the jars used to hold Classico sauce and had a lip
    that took regular canning lids. I have notice that the new Classico
    sauce jars do NOT have the same lip, they have a different lid. I
    suspect that, from your experience they are no longer made like regular
    canning jars if you have them breaking. Certainly they would not hold
    jar contents if they lip has different threads than a regular canning
    jar. For that reason my friends no longer save me the Classico sauce
    jars. I never bought any canned sauce because I like my homemade sauce
    much better. I occasionally run up on some of the old Classico jars at
    garage sales, etc.

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