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Thread: Pressure Canner Suggestions

  1. #1
    Naomi Jordan Guest

    Default Pressure Canner Suggestions

    Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    On 9/15/2011 12:39 PM, Naomi Jordan wrote:
    > Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    > to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    > using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    > After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    > started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    > we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    > garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    > stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    > go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    > Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    > and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    > Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    > guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    > What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?


    I've a Sears pressure canner/cooker made by Presto and have had it since
    about 1964. So far I've only had to replace the gasket twice. Believe it
    or not Presto still makes the gauges, gaskets, jigglers aka weighted
    gauge, even the handles. My canner has both a steam gauge and a
    "weighted gauge." I prefer the steam gauge as it is more accurate than a
    jiggler.

    In addition the non-gasket types are generally much more expensive.
    Here's the one similar to mine that is on Amazon, quite often you can
    get free shipping there too.
    http://tinyurl.com/3mkgpra

    I can also use my pressure canner for a boiling water bath and often do
    when I have a lot of stuff to BWB that won't fit in the aluminum BWB
    kettle I use most often.

    Seriously you should decide on the canner that you will feel most
    comfortable with and learn to use it with proficiency and always,
    always, follow the instruction to the letter. No free lancing with canners.

    After each use wipe down the gasket and rinse it off, don't get water in
    the steam gauge and let it sit, you can clean the inside of an aluminum
    pressure canner with cream of tartar in a paste so it doesn't get
    unsightly. I seldom clean the inside of mine other than to wash it with
    soap and water after each use. Above all, follow the instructions, can't
    repeat that often enough.

    Check with your state extension service to see if there might be a class
    on pressure canning near you, that's always helpful.

    I won't repeat the warning about boiling water bath on meats as I see
    you're already learned that lesson. Be grateful one jar blew up as, if
    you had actually eaten some of it, your family might have died of
    botulism. What mom and grandmom did umpteen years ago doesn't apply any
    more, not if you're serious about food safety.

    Go here for more information: http://tinyurl.com/9fy34

    George

  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    Naomi Jordan wrote:
    > Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    > to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    > using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    > After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    > started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    > we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    > garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    > stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    > go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    > Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    > and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    > Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    > guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    > What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?



    I have 3; a small Mirro, and large Mirro, and a very large
    (double-stack of quart jars) Presto. My mom has a big All American
    canner, although I think they had a different name back then. It's
    the one without a gasket.

    The Mirros have a gasket and a weighted gauge. The Presto has a
    gasket and the dial gauge and a "jiggler" that's like a weighted gauge
    but it's not calibrated. The All American has no gasket, a dial
    gauge, and no jiggler.

    I like the Presto the best, but I seldom use it because the one I
    bought is just too big for what I need. The All American is just as
    big and it weighs twice as much.

    Both Mirro canners still have their original gaskets. They were
    purchased in the 1980's. And I use them for cooking as well as canning.

    -Bob

  4. #4
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    Naomi Jordan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    > to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    > using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    > After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    > started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    > we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    > garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    > stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    > go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    > Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    > and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    > Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    > guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    > What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?


    I love my small All-American 910 - 10.5 quart pressure canner. My small
    canner can hold 7 pint jars or 4 quart jars. It heats up fast and cools
    down fast. I used it today to make 7 pints of tomato juice. The small
    canner also fits nicely on my small stove. My stove has a microwave oven
    above and it leaves plenty of clearance for the microwave. Small enough to
    fit nicely on a single burner with plenty of room for the cook pots around
    it.

    Since it does not have a gasket to rot, it will last for centuries... Well
    my lifetime. It has a weighted Gage and a visual only pressure Gage on it,
    so one can make double sure you are at the correct pressure.

    It is only for me, I have have no family to feed. Therefore I am into small
    batch preserving. For a large family, a larger canner may be for you. But
    make sure you have plenty of open space above your stove. If you are like
    me and a microwave that larger pressure canner may not fit under your
    stove. If I did have a large family I would rather have two small All
    American Canners than one large one.

    Even though the canner itself is heavy, it uses very little water compared
    to a water bath canner. A pressure canner with little water weighs a whole
    lot less than a water bath canner loaded with water. I also believe that a
    pressure canner uses less gas to heat the thing up over a water bath
    canner. But it does take time for it cool down where it does not for the
    water bath. But the cool down uses no gas.

    http://www.allamericancanner.com/all...surecanner.htm

    --
    Nad

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Naomi Jordan <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    > to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    > using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    > After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    > started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    > we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    > garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    > stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    > go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    > Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    > and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    > Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    > guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    > What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?


    All American is the Cadillac. I have a Mirro weighted gauge. Make sure
    the diameter of the canner is not more than 2" larger than the diameter
    of the burner you will use it on.

    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 16, 2011

  6. #6
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    On 9/17/2011 1:08 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Naomi Jordan<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    >> to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    >> using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    >> After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    >> started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    >> we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    >> garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    >> stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    >> go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    >> Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    >> and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    >> Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    >> guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    >> What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?

    >
    > All American is the Cadillac. I have a Mirro weighted gauge. Make sure
    > the diameter of the canner is not more than 2" larger than the diameter
    > of the burner you will use it on.
    >

    Depends if she has an electric range or a gas one. Some of my pots
    overlap the gas burner by three or four inches with no problem. Forgot
    to warn Naomi about heavy pots if she has a glass top electric stove,
    that's a no-no according to the manufacturers.

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    In article <4e74ed54$0$2077$[email protected]> ,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:


    > to warn Naomi about heavy pots if she has a glass top electric stove,
    > that's a no-no according to the manufacturers.


    Depends on the manufacturer.
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  8. #8
    Naomi Jordan Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    On Sep 17, 2:51*pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    > On 9/17/2011 1:08 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > In article
    > > <268aaeca-92b0-415e-9008-c68f7e5d7...@u20g2000yqj.googlegroups.com>,
    > > * Naomi Jordan<jordan....@gmail.com> *wrote:

    >
    > >> Hello all! *I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. *I'mnew
    > >> to the wonderful world of canning. *I tried to can some chicken stew
    > >> using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    > >> After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    > >> started reading up on why this could have happened. *OOPS! *Good thing
    > >> we didn't eat any of it. *Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    > >> garbage. *Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    > >> stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) *I'm ready to give it another
    > >> go! *I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    > >> Amazon.com. *Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    > >> and some are saying "buy this one! *it has a weighted guage!" *In my
    > >> Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    > >> guage. *But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. *What to do???
    > >> What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?

    >
    > > All American is the Cadillac. *I have a Mirro weighted gauge. *Makesure
    > > the diameter of the canner is not more than 2" larger than the diameter
    > > of the burner you will use it on.

    >
    > Depends if she has an electric range or a gas one. Some of my pots
    > overlap the gas burner by three or four inches with no problem. Forgot
    > to warn Naomi about heavy pots if she has a glass top electric stove,
    > that's a no-no according to the manufacturers.


    Thank you all for replying! Good thing I have a little while to
    decide! I have an electric range. I was going to get a new stove
    this winter and had thought about getting a glass top. Will have to
    check into that now that I want to can. Thanks for mentioning it!!

  9. #9
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    Naomi Jordan <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Sep 17, 2:51 pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    >> On 9/17/2011 1:08 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> In article
    >>> <268aaeca-92b0-415e-9008-c68f7e5d7...@u20g2000yqj.googlegroups.com>,
    >>> Naomi Jordan<jordan....@gmail.com> wrote:

    >>
    >>>> Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    >>>> to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    >>>> using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    >>>> After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    >>>> started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    >>>> we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    >>>> garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    >>>> stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    >>>> go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    >>>> Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    >>>> and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    >>>> Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    >>>> guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    >>>> What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?

    >>
    >>> All American is the Cadillac. I have a Mirro weighted gauge. Make sure
    >>> the diameter of the canner is not more than 2" larger than the diameter
    >>> of the burner you will use it on.

    >>
    >> Depends if she has an electric range or a gas one. Some of my pots
    >> overlap the gas burner by three or four inches with no problem. Forgot
    >> to warn Naomi about heavy pots if she has a glass top electric stove,
    >> that's a no-no according to the manufacturers.

    >
    > Thank you all for replying! Good thing I have a little while to
    > decide! I have an electric range. I was going to get a new stove
    > this winter and had thought about getting a glass top. Will have to
    > check into that now that I want to can. Thanks for mentioning it!!


    Not only about heavy pots. Electric stoves may not get hot enough for large
    Canners filled with water to maintain a boil. I know people with electric
    stoves make lousy pasta, they just cannot get the water hot enough.
    However, electric ovens does a much better job for bread making. Gas ovens
    cycle on and off, electric ovens will maintain a constant even heat.

    I think it goes like this. Gas ovens do not bake as well as electric ovens.
    Electric stove tops do not cook as well as gas.

    Did I introduce more chaos in your choice of stove tops

    --
    Nad

  10. #10
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    On 9/25/2011 8:03 PM, Nad wrote:
    > Naomi Jordan<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Sep 17, 2:51 pm, George Shirley<gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    >>> On 9/17/2011 1:08 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> In article
    >>>> <268aaeca-92b0-415e-9008-c68f7e5d7...@u20g2000yqj.googlegroups.com>,
    >>>> Naomi Jordan<jordan....@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    >>>>> to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    >>>>> using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    >>>>> After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    >>>>> started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    >>>>> we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    >>>>> garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    >>>>> stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    >>>>> go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    >>>>> Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    >>>>> and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    >>>>> Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    >>>>> guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    >>>>> What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?
    >>>
    >>>> All American is the Cadillac. I have a Mirro weighted gauge. Make sure
    >>>> the diameter of the canner is not more than 2" larger than the diameter
    >>>> of the burner you will use it on.
    >>>
    >>> Depends if she has an electric range or a gas one. Some of my pots
    >>> overlap the gas burner by three or four inches with no problem. Forgot
    >>> to warn Naomi about heavy pots if she has a glass top electric stove,
    >>> that's a no-no according to the manufacturers.

    >>
    >> Thank you all for replying! Good thing I have a little while to
    >> decide! I have an electric range. I was going to get a new stove
    >> this winter and had thought about getting a glass top. Will have to
    >> check into that now that I want to can. Thanks for mentioning it!!

    >
    > Not only about heavy pots. Electric stoves may not get hot enough for large
    > Canners filled with water to maintain a boil. I know people with electric
    > stoves make lousy pasta, they just cannot get the water hot enough.
    > However, electric ovens does a much better job for bread making. Gas ovens
    > cycle on and off, electric ovens will maintain a constant even heat.


    Not necessarily, my gas stove does an excellent job of bread baking, I
    seldom use it for that though. Our Frigidaire doesn't cycle on and off,
    the gas is always firing, just drops enough to keep from overheating.
    Plus the stove top portion has five burners, two have the same BTU
    output, I think 6,000 BTU, there's also a 15,000 BTU burner, that's
    where I put the pressure canner or the BWB canner, reaches a boil
    quickly and then gets turned down to maintain the boil.

    Barb said something the other day that made sense, said not all glass
    top stoves have warnings about heavy pots so there are probably some
    that could handle canners. I would carefully check them out though.
    >
    > I think it goes like this. Gas ovens do not bake as well as electric ovens.
    > Electric stove tops do not cook as well as gas.
    >
    > Did I introduce more chaos in your choice of stove tops
    >



  11. #11
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    On Mon, 26 Sep 2011 01:03:18 +0000 (UTC), Nad
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Naomi Jordan <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On Sep 17, 2:51 pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    >>> On 9/17/2011 1:08 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> In article
    >>>> <268aaeca-92b0-415e-9008-c68f7e5d7...@u20g2000yqj.googlegroups.com>,
    >>>> Naomi Jordan<jordan....@gmail.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> Hello all! I'm looking for some pressure canner suggestions. I'm new
    >>>>> to the wonderful world of canning. I tried to can some chicken stew
    >>>>> using the method my Granny used to use to do it...open water bath.
    >>>>> After one of the jars exploded in my pantry and smelled horrid, I
    >>>>> started reading up on why this could have happened. OOPS! Good thing
    >>>>> we didn't eat any of it. Sadly all of that lovely stew went into the
    >>>>> garbage. Now that I have read several books on the proper way to can
    >>>>> stew (and fruits, veggies, jams, etc.) I'm ready to give it another
    >>>>> go! I've been reading the reviews on a couple pressure canners from
    >>>>> Amazon.com. Some are saying "buy this one, there are no gaskets!"
    >>>>> and some are saying "buy this one! it has a weighted guage!" In my
    >>>>> Complete Book of Home Preserving...they seem to favor a weighted
    >>>>> guage. But the idea of no gaskets is appealing to me. What to do???
    >>>>> What are the best brands, types, styles, etc.?
    >>>
    >>>> All American is the Cadillac. I have a Mirro weighted gauge. Make sure
    >>>> the diameter of the canner is not more than 2" larger than the diameter
    >>>> of the burner you will use it on.
    >>>
    >>> Depends if she has an electric range or a gas one. Some of my pots
    >>> overlap the gas burner by three or four inches with no problem. Forgot
    >>> to warn Naomi about heavy pots if she has a glass top electric stove,
    >>> that's a no-no according to the manufacturers.

    >>
    >> Thank you all for replying! Good thing I have a little while to
    >> decide! I have an electric range. I was going to get a new stove
    >> this winter and had thought about getting a glass top. Will have to
    >> check into that now that I want to can. Thanks for mentioning it!!

    >
    >Not only about heavy pots. Electric stoves may not get hot enough for large
    >Canners filled with water to maintain a boil. I know people with electric
    >stoves make lousy pasta, they just cannot get the water hot enough.
    >However, electric ovens does a much better job for bread making. Gas ovens
    >cycle on and off, electric ovens will maintain a constant even heat.
    >
    >I think it goes like this. Gas ovens do not bake as well as electric ovens.
    >Electric stove tops do not cook as well as gas.
    >

    I don't think one can make a blanket statement like that. It will
    depend more on the type/brand of range rather than the fuel.
    Our gas oven does not cycle fully on and off constantly, rather it's
    fully on until the set temperature is reached then the flame lowers
    and raises as dictated by the thermostat. It maintains a very constant
    temperature.
    Electric ovens also cycle on and off and most are either off or fully
    on. Depending on the hysteresis of the thermostat, the temperature can
    fluctuate quite widely.
    Also, electric heat is a very dry heat while one of the byproducts of
    gas combustion is water vapour, very beneficial for bread baking.
    I do agree that electric stove tops do not cook as well as gas.
    That's just my opinion, YMMV.

    Ross.

  12. #12
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Pressure Canner Suggestions

    <Ross@home> wrote:
    >
    >> I think it goes like this. Gas ovens do not bake as well as electric ovens.
    >> Electric stove tops do not cook as well as gas.
    >>

    > I don't think one can make a blanket statement like that. It will
    > depend more on the type/brand of range rather than the fuel.
    > Our gas oven does not cycle fully on and off constantly, rather it's
    > fully on until the set temperature is reached then the flame lowers
    > and raises as dictated by the thermostat. It maintains a very constant
    > temperature.
    > Electric ovens also cycle on and off and most are either off or fully
    > on. Depending on the hysteresis of the thermostat, the temperature can
    > fluctuate quite widely.
    > Also, electric heat is a very dry heat while one of the byproducts of
    > gas combustion is water vapour, very beneficial for bread baking.
    > I do agree that electric stove tops do not cook as well as gas.
    > That's just my opinion, YMMV.
    >
    > Ross.


    Thanks for the info.. That will be a must have feature on my next gas
    stove/oven. My oven does a lousy job baking. I have found using those
    "AirBake" sheets and "Pizza Stones" works wonders for me. Without them my
    baking adventures would still be in a depressed state of mind.

    --
    Nad

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