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Thread: Preserving Lemons Question

  1. #1
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Preserving Lemons Question


    I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.

    <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>


    They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    Is it safe? I don't understand the process.

    Isabella
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  2. #2
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    On Tue, 30 Sep 2008 16:37:26 -0500, Isabella Woodhouse
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    >
    ><http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    ><http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    >
    >
    >They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    >Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    >after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    >Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    >
    >Isabella


    i've done preserved lemons several times, and always stored them in
    the fridge. never used oil, just salt and lemons.

  3. #3
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    >
    > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    >
    >
    > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    >


    My guess is that it's okay because they're kept in the refrigerator. They're
    not preserved in the sense that they have been processed in a boiling water
    bath canner with sealed lids to sit on a pantry shelf.

    -Marilyn
    whose been away from r.f.p. for much too long




  4. #4
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <return_to_sender@address_unknown.net> wrote:

    > "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >
    > > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    > >
    > > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    > > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    > >
    > > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    > > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    > > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    > > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.

    >
    > My guess is that it's okay because they're kept in the refrigerator. They're
    > not preserved in the sense that they have been processed in a boiling water
    > bath canner with sealed lids to sit on a pantry shelf.
    >
    > -Marilyn
    > whose been away from r.f.p. for much too long


    Thanks And I see a 'Welcome back' is in order too.

    Isabella
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  5. #5
    The Joneses Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question


    "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    >
    > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    >
    >
    > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    >
    > Isabella
    > --
    > "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"


    Joy of Pickling has a similar Moroccan recipe that I successfully made with
    both lemons and limes. It did not use oil. One did not have to refrigerate
    it. I just kept them on the counter. They did fine. The tremendous amount of
    salt makes them a salty condiment, but prevents anything growing, or should.
    The limes (the big thickskinned Persian type), faded a bit in coloring,
    but oh, the perfume! The lemons were nothing but bEutiful. And tasty. I used
    mason jars & the plastic storage caps one can buy. Only they do not fit
    perfectly with all that salt about, so when you turn them over ever few
    days, it pays to have the jars sitting in a pretty bowl to catch the drip. I
    believe salt is corrosive to metal lids, eh? They lasted a long, long time.
    I used them up before the year was over. If you use pint mason jars, use
    regular tops so you can wedge a wedge of fruit to keep them submerged.
    We used to have a correspondent from (Hawaii?) the tropics who made this
    by setting the jar on his roof in the sun.
    I've made certain pickles with just a spoonful or two of oil, but with
    veggies in plenty enuf vinegar (or brine) to kill germs. I've still got that
    "if it's in oil, it's air tight and botulism can grow" deal going on, so I
    would refrigerate if a lot of oil is used (more oil than salty juice?) But
    I'm not a food scientist, just seems reasonable.
    When I used this, I pulled out the middle parts (have squoze them for the
    juice) and sliced the peel thinly.
    m2cw.
    Edrena




  6. #6
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    In article <PuBEk.2215$[email protected]>,
    "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > mason jars & the plastic storage caps one can buy. Only they do not fit
    > perfectly with all that salt about, so when you turn them over ever few
    > days, it pays to have the jars sitting in a pretty bowl to catch the drip. I
    > believe salt is corrosive to metal lids, eh? They lasted a long, long time.


    > Edrena
    >

    How about a coupla layers of plastic wrap between the jar and the lid?
    I'll bet the seal would still be good.


    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, and here's the link to my appearance
    on "A Prairie Home Companion," <http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/
    programs/2008/08/30/>

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Isabella Woodhouse <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    >
    > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    >
    >
    > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    >
    > Isabella


    Plenty acid, I would expect they'd be fine.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.mac.com/barbschaller, and here's the link to my appearance
    on "A Prairie Home Companion," <http://prairiehome.publicradio.org/
    programs/2008/08/30/>

  8. #8
    The Joneses Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <PuBEk.2215$[email protected]>,
    > "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> mason jars & the plastic storage caps one can buy. Only they do not fit
    >> perfectly with all that salt about, so when you turn them over ever few
    >> days, it pays to have the jars sitting in a pretty bowl to catch the
    >> drip. I
    >> believe salt is corrosive to metal lids, eh? They lasted a long, long
    >> time.

    >
    >> Edrena
    >>

    > How about a coupla layers of plastic wrap between the jar and the lid?
    > I'll bet the seal would still be good.
    >
    >
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ


    Well, thar you go, it's why we're all here, to help each other. Sometimes, I
    swear the simplest things pass me right by.
    Edrena



  9. #9
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 10:34:39 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <PuBEk.2215$[email protected]>,
    > "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> mason jars & the plastic storage caps one can buy. Only they do not fit
    >> perfectly with all that salt about, so when you turn them over ever few
    >> days, it pays to have the jars sitting in a pretty bowl to catch the drip. I
    >> believe salt is corrosive to metal lids, eh? They lasted a long, long time.

    >
    >> Edrena
    >>

    >How about a coupla layers of plastic wrap between the jar and the lid?
    >I'll bet the seal would still be good.


    That's what I did, worked fine!

    snow

  10. #10
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Melba's Jammin' <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Isabella Woodhouse <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    > >
    > > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    > > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    > >
    > >
    > > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    > > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    > > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    > > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    > >
    > > Isabella

    >
    > Plenty acid, I would expect they'd be fine.


    Cool. Thanks!
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  11. #11
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    In article <PuBEk.2215$[email protected]>,
    "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > >
    > > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    > >
    > > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    > > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    > >
    > >
    > > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    > > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    > > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    > > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    > >
    > > Isabella
    > > --
    > > "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"

    >
    > Joy of Pickling has a similar Moroccan recipe that I successfully made with
    > both lemons and limes. It did not use oil. One did not have to refrigerate
    > it. I just kept them on the counter. They did fine. The tremendous amount of
    > salt makes them a salty condiment, but prevents anything growing, or should.
    > The limes (the big thickskinned Persian type), faded a bit in coloring,
    > but oh, the perfume! The lemons were nothing but bEutiful. And tasty. I used
    > mason jars & the plastic storage caps one can buy. Only they do not fit
    > perfectly with all that salt about, so when you turn them over ever few
    > days, it pays to have the jars sitting in a pretty bowl to catch the drip. I
    > believe salt is corrosive to metal lids, eh? They lasted a long, long time.
    > I used them up before the year was over. If you use pint mason jars, use
    > regular tops so you can wedge a wedge of fruit to keep them submerged.
    > We used to have a correspondent from (Hawaii?) the tropics who made this
    > by setting the jar on his roof in the sun.
    > I've made certain pickles with just a spoonful or two of oil, but with
    > veggies in plenty enuf vinegar (or brine) to kill germs. I've still got that
    > "if it's in oil, it's air tight and botulism can grow" deal going on, so I
    > would refrigerate if a lot of oil is used (more oil than salty juice?) But
    > I'm not a food scientist, just seems reasonable.
    > When I used this, I pulled out the middle parts (have squoze them for the
    > juice) and sliced the peel thinly.


    Oh how interesting. You zeroed right in on what bothered me the
    most.... the oil... what with all the warnings about botulism. I
    finally found my JOP, but mine does call for oil, though only a couple
    of tablespoons. Perhaps I have a different edition. What I really wish
    is that they would tell you what the heck the oil is for. I also found
    my _Creative Pickling at Home_ (same hiding place as the JOP) and it has
    a recipe without the oil, so I think that is the one I will use. Thanks
    so much Edrena. You are always so helpful. I just love having these
    extra-special-tasty items around to help liven up our meals. BTW, I was
    thinking of using wide-mouth jars with those wide-mouth plastic lids.
    These lemons would look so pretty in those Weck jars but, alas, you
    couldn't turn them over!

    Isabella
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  12. #12
    Mark A.Meggs Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 23:16:52 -0500, Isabella Woodhouse
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <PuBEk.2215$[email protected]>,
    > "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >> >
    >> > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    >> >
    >> > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    >> > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    >> >
    >> >
    >> > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in the
    >> > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    >> > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like this?
    >> > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    >> >
    >> > Isabella
    >> > --
    >> > "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"

    >>
    >> Joy of Pickling has a similar Moroccan recipe that I successfully made with
    >> both lemons and limes. It did not use oil. One did not have to refrigerate
    >> it. I just kept them on the counter. They did fine. The tremendous amount of
    >> salt makes them a salty condiment, but prevents anything growing, or should.
    >> The limes (the big thickskinned Persian type), faded a bit in coloring,
    >> but oh, the perfume! The lemons were nothing but bEutiful. And tasty. I used
    >> mason jars & the plastic storage caps one can buy. Only they do not fit
    >> perfectly with all that salt about, so when you turn them over ever few
    >> days, it pays to have the jars sitting in a pretty bowl to catch the drip. I
    >> believe salt is corrosive to metal lids, eh? They lasted a long, long time.
    >> I used them up before the year was over. If you use pint mason jars, use
    >> regular tops so you can wedge a wedge of fruit to keep them submerged.
    >> We used to have a correspondent from (Hawaii?) the tropics who made this
    >> by setting the jar on his roof in the sun.
    >> I've made certain pickles with just a spoonful or two of oil, but with
    >> veggies in plenty enuf vinegar (or brine) to kill germs. I've still got that
    >> "if it's in oil, it's air tight and botulism can grow" deal going on, so I
    >> would refrigerate if a lot of oil is used (more oil than salty juice?) But
    >> I'm not a food scientist, just seems reasonable.
    >> When I used this, I pulled out the middle parts (have squoze them for the
    >> juice) and sliced the peel thinly.

    >
    >Oh how interesting. You zeroed right in on what bothered me the
    >most.... the oil... what with all the warnings about botulism. I
    >finally found my JOP, but mine does call for oil, though only a couple
    >of tablespoons. Perhaps I have a different edition. What I really wish
    >is that they would tell you what the heck the oil is for. I also found
    >my _Creative Pickling at Home_ (same hiding place as the JOP) and it has
    >a recipe without the oil, so I think that is the one I will use. Thanks
    >so much Edrena. You are always so helpful. I just love having these
    >extra-special-tasty items around to help liven up our meals. BTW, I was
    >thinking of using wide-mouth jars with those wide-mouth plastic lids.
    >These lemons would look so pretty in those Weck jars but, alas, you
    >couldn't turn them over!
    >
    >Isabella


    As far as I know, the oil is simply to block air from gettting to the
    lemons - it slows down oxidation. I don't think it has anything to do
    with preveting botulism or other spoilage - the pH level and salt take
    care of that. Lemon juice is around pH 2.6.

    Remember too, that where they come from - North Africa - they're used
    daily and don't really have a chance to go bad.

    - Mark

  13. #13
    Kitty Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    This is an interesting question. I believe since Lemons have oil in
    the rind, this added oil would help to save that instead of allowing
    it to evaporate. FWIW, kitty

  14. #14
    The Joneses Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question


    "Mark A.Meggs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 23:16:52 -0500, Isabella Woodhouse
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In article <PuBEk.2215$[email protected]>,
    >> "The Joneses" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>> >
    >>> > I found these two recipes, for preserving lemons, in Gourmet.
    >>> >
    >>> > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/1990s/1999/12/preservedmeyerlemons>
    >>> > <http://www.gourmet.com/recipes/2000s/2008/05/preservedlemons>
    >>> >
    >>> >
    >>> > They are different than other recipes I have seen... like the one in
    >>> > the
    >>> > Ball Complete book for instance. These call for some oil to be added
    >>> > after the jars have stood for 5 days. Has anyone done lemons like
    >>> > this?
    >>> > Is it safe? I don't understand the process.
    >>> >
    >>> > Isabella
    >>> > --
    >>> > "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    >>>
    >>> Joy of Pickling has a similar Moroccan recipe that I successfully made
    >>> with
    >>> both lemons and limes. It did not use oil. One did not have to
    >>> refrigerate
    >>> it. I just kept them on the counter. They did fine. The tremendous
    >>> amount of
    >>> salt makes them a salty condiment, but prevents anything growing, or
    >>> should.
    >>> The limes (the big thickskinned Persian type), faded a bit in
    >>> coloring,
    >>> but oh, the perfume! The lemons were nothing but bEutiful. And tasty. I
    >>> used
    >>> mason jars & the plastic storage caps one can buy. Only they do not fit
    >>> perfectly with all that salt about, so when you turn them over ever few
    >>> days, it pays to have the jars sitting in a pretty bowl to catch the
    >>> drip. I
    >>> believe salt is corrosive to metal lids, eh? They lasted a long, long
    >>> time.
    >>> I used them up before the year was over. If you use pint mason jars, use
    >>> regular tops so you can wedge a wedge of fruit to keep them submerged.
    >>> We used to have a correspondent from (Hawaii?) the tropics who made
    >>> this
    >>> by setting the jar on his roof in the sun.
    >>> I've made certain pickles with just a spoonful or two of oil, but with
    >>> veggies in plenty enuf vinegar (or brine) to kill germs. I've still got
    >>> that
    >>> "if it's in oil, it's air tight and botulism can grow" deal going on, so
    >>> I
    >>> would refrigerate if a lot of oil is used (more oil than salty juice?)
    >>> But
    >>> I'm not a food scientist, just seems reasonable.
    >>> When I used this, I pulled out the middle parts (have squoze them for
    >>> the
    >>> juice) and sliced the peel thinly.

    >>
    >>Oh how interesting. You zeroed right in on what bothered me the
    >>most.... the oil... what with all the warnings about botulism. I
    >>finally found my JOP, but mine does call for oil, though only a couple
    >>of tablespoons. Perhaps I have a different edition. What I really wish
    >>is that they would tell you what the heck the oil is for. I also found
    >>my _Creative Pickling at Home_ (same hiding place as the JOP) and it has
    >>a recipe without the oil, so I think that is the one I will use. Thanks
    >>so much Edrena. You are always so helpful. I just love having these
    >>extra-special-tasty items around to help liven up our meals. BTW, I was
    >>thinking of using wide-mouth jars with those wide-mouth plastic lids.
    >>These lemons would look so pretty in those Weck jars but, alas, you
    >>couldn't turn them over!
    >>
    >>Isabella

    >
    > As far as I know, the oil is simply to block air from gettting to the
    > lemons - it slows down oxidation. I don't think it has anything to do
    > with preveting botulism or other spoilage - the pH level and salt take
    > care of that. Lemon juice is around pH 2.6.
    >
    > Remember too, that where they come from - North Africa - they're used
    > daily and don't really have a chance to go bad.
    >
    > - Mark


    All good sense, Mark, the pH factor would prevent botulism from growing. One
    has to remember, too, that bot~~ is very common and our bodies are probably
    used to some of it, 'ceptin' if y'all are diseased, oldy, or babies. Mark -
    what you think about refrigeration? Even with the oil, prob. not needed for
    all those reasons? It is very beautiful condiment. Maybe I did use oil, I'll
    look it up in my canning journal.
    Edrena



  15. #15
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark A.Meggs <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 23:16:52 -0500, Isabella Woodhouse
    > <[email protected]> wrote:


    > >......What I really wish
    > >is that they would tell you what the heck the oil is for.


    > As far as I know, the oil is simply to block air from gettting to the
    > lemons - it slows down oxidation.


    Ah ha! So that's why the oil. Thank you.

    > ...I don't think it has anything to do
    > with preveting botulism or other spoilage - the pH level and salt take
    > care of that. Lemon juice is around pH 2.6.
    >
    > Remember too, that where they come from - North Africa - they're used
    > daily and don't really have a chance to go bad.


    We were worried it might help botulism to grow, not the converse.

    Isabella
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  16. #16
    Mark A.Meggs Guest

    Default Re: Preserving Lemons Question

    On Thu, 2 Oct 2008 09:34:56 -0600, "The Joneses" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Mark A.Meggs" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .


    /snip/
    >
    >All good sense, Mark, the pH factor would prevent botulism from growing. One
    >has to remember, too, that bot~~ is very common and our bodies are probably
    >used to some of it, 'ceptin' if y'all are diseased, oldy, or babies. Mark -
    >what you think about refrigeration? Even with the oil, prob. not needed for
    >all those reasons? It is very beautiful condiment. Maybe I did use oil, I'll
    >look it up in my canning journal.
    >Edrena
    >


    I don't think refrigeration will hurt them. I'm sure it would extend
    their useful life like it does for most things.

    The recipe I've used in the past is from Patricia Wells' "At Home in
    Provence". It calls for 1/2 cup of olive oil and refrigeration after
    the initial "ripening" time as she calls it.


    2 organic lemons
    1/3 cup coarse sea salt
    1/2 cup lemon juice
    1/2 cup olive oil (she says extra virgin, I say don't waste your
    money)

    Scrub the lemons well, allow to dry and cut each lemon length-wise
    into 4 wedges. In a non-reactive bowl, toss lemon wedges with salt
    and lemon juice.

    Place in a 2-cup glass container with a non-metal lid that can be
    tightly sealed. Seal the container and let the lemons ripen at room
    temperature for 7 days. Shake daily to distribute the salt and lemon
    juice.

    To store, add olive oil to cover and refrigerate for up to 6 months.
    To use, bring to room temperature.


    - Mark

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