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Thread: Pickling eggs

  1. #1
    Kitty Guest

    Default Pickling eggs

    Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.

    Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?

  2. #2
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs



    "Kitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    > least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    > and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >
    > Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    > degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?


    I make them. Hard boil the eggs. Boil up the vinegar with any spices you
    like. Reduce the vinegar by about 2 thirds ... pour it over the eggs.

    I use malt vinegar which is traditional for me. I pop the lid on and they
    keep very well. I only make them about once a year and have never had one
    go 'off'.

    Whether you in the US feel the need to do more.. I can't say, but as I say,
    I have never had one go off.
    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  3. #3
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    On Fri, 3 Dec 2010 07:06:54 -0800 (PST), Kitty <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    >least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    >and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >
    >Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    >degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?


    In all things related to home food preservation, the NCHFP is now my
    gold standard. http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/

    There are a number of recipes for pickled eggs at their site, with the
    following caveat:
    Quote>
    There are no home canning directions for pickled eggs. All of the
    following pickled egg recipes are for storage in the refrigerator.
    Pickled eggs should never be at room temperature except for serving
    time, when they should be limited to no more than 2 hours in the
    temperature danger zone of 40 to 140 degrees F.

    Caution: Home pickled eggs stored at room temperature have caused
    botulism. For the report from the Centers for Disease Control and
    Prevention (CDC), see
    http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4934a2.htm
    <End Quote>

    In years past I have made pickled eggs and stored them at room
    temperature with no ill effects. Now they get refrigerated.
    Better safe than sorry, as the saying goes.

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada.
    AgCanada Zone 5b
    43 17' 26.75" North
    80 13' 29.46" West

  4. #4
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs



    <Ross@home> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 3 Dec 2010 07:06:54 -0800 (PST), Kitty <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    >>least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    >>and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >>
    >>Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    >>degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?

    >
    > In all things related to home food preservation, the NCHFP is now my
    > gold standard. http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/
    >
    > There are a number of recipes for pickled eggs at their site, with the
    > following caveat:
    > Quote>
    > There are no home canning directions for pickled eggs. All of the
    > following pickled egg recipes are for storage in the refrigerator.
    > Pickled eggs should never be at room temperature except for serving
    > time, when they should be limited to no more than 2 hours in the
    > temperature danger zone of 40 to 140 degrees F.
    >
    > Caution: Home pickled eggs stored at room temperature have caused
    > botulism. For the report from the Centers for Disease Control and
    > Prevention (CDC), see
    > http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4934a2.htm
    > <End Quote>
    >
    > In years past I have made pickled eggs and stored them at room
    > temperature with no ill effects. Now they get refrigerated.
    > Better safe than sorry, as the saying goes.


    Mine are not refrigerated but they are always stored in a cool dark place

    One more thing... I leave them for around 3 months before we eat them.
    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  5. #5
    Kitty Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    On Dec 3, 10:12*am, "Ophelia" <Ophe...@Elsinore.me.uk> wrote:
    > "Kitty" <basyfe...@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    > > Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    > > least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    > > and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.

    >
    > > Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    > > degree that they are safe at room temperature. * Anyone know?

    >
    > I make them. *Hard boil the eggs. *Boil up the vinegar with any spices you
    > like. Reduce the vinegar by about 2 thirds ... pour it over the eggs.
    >
    > I use malt vinegar which is traditional for me. * I pop the lid on and they
    > keep very well. *I only make them about once a year and have never had one
    > go 'off'.



    how long do they keep?

  6. #6
    Kitty Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs


    >
    > > In years past I have made pickled eggs and stored them at room
    > > temperature with no ill effects. Now they get refrigerated.
    > > Better safe than sorry, as the saying goes.

    >
    > Mine are not refrigerated but they are always stored in a cool dark place
    >
    > One more thing... I leave them for around 3 months before we eat them.
    > --
    > --https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


    oooh, wow. Never thought to keep them that long.


    OK, now another question? For those vetran picklers someone told me
    that boiling vinegar reduces the PH. would reducing it raise the PH
    or is there another way to raise the PH? thanks, kitty


  7. #7
    Zhang Dawei Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    In article <87a99291-6ae1-4b2a-8c90-
    [email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > On Dec 3, 10:12*am, "Ophelia" <Ophe...@Elsinore.me.uk> wrote:
    > > "Kitty" <basyfe...@verizon.net> wrote in message
    > >
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > > > Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    > > > least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    > > > and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.

    > >
    > > > Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    > > > degree that they are safe at room temperature. * Anyone know?

    > >
    > > I make them. *Hard boil the eggs. *Boil up the vinegar with any spices you
    > > like. Reduce the vinegar by about 2 thirds ... pour it over the eggs.
    > >
    > > I use malt vinegar which is traditional for me. * I pop the lid on and they
    > > keep very well. *I only make them about once a year and have never had one
    > > go 'off'.

    >
    >
    > how long do they keep?


    I've used the same recipe as Ophelia on many occasions in the UK, as my
    parents did for many more years than I. I also keep them in a dark
    slightly cool place, and not a refrigerator, just as my parents did, and
    I made them with no ill effects for around 7 years up to last year. My
    parents had made them more many more years than that with no ill
    effects. We usually ate the last ones at about age 6 to 9 months.

    --
    Zhang Dawei: Beijing, P.R.China. (Native BrEng Speaker)
    Please use Reply-To header for email address. This will
    remain valid for at least two weeks from date of posting.

  8. #8
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs



    "Kitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:18a71a2e-b8f0-4b5d-a036-14fdf53d1984@z1[email protected]..
    >
    >>
    >> > In years past I have made pickled eggs and stored them at room
    >> > temperature with no ill effects. Now they get refrigerated.
    >> > Better safe than sorry, as the saying goes.

    >>
    >> Mine are not refrigerated but they are always stored in a cool dark place
    >>
    >> One more thing... I leave them for around 3 months before we eat them.


    > oooh, wow. Never thought to keep them that long.


    If I try to eat them before that time, the vinegar is harsh.



    > OK, now another question? For those vetran picklers someone told me
    > that boiling vinegar reduces the PH. would reducing it raise the PH
    > or is there another way to raise the PH? thanks, kitty
    >


    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  9. #9
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs



    "Kitty" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Dec 3, 10:12 am, "Ophelia" <Ophe...@Elsinore.me.uk> wrote:
    >> "Kitty" <basyfe...@verizon.net> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:[email protected]...
    >>
    >> > Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    >> > least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    >> > and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.

    >>
    >> > Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    >> > degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?

    >>
    >> I make them. Hard boil the eggs. Boil up the vinegar with any spices
    >> you
    >> like. Reduce the vinegar by about 2 thirds ... pour it over the eggs.
    >>
    >> I use malt vinegar which is traditional for me. I pop the lid on and
    >> they
    >> keep very well. I only make them about once a year and have never had
    >> one
    >> go 'off'.

    >
    >
    > how long do they keep?


    From one year to the next. Beyond that I don't know. I have been making
    them this way for 50years and my mother and grandmother before me.

    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  10. #10
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    On 12/3/2010 9:06 AM, Kitty wrote:
    > Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    > least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    > and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >
    > Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    > degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?


    Here's your answer Kitty:
    http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_06/pickled_eggs.html

  11. #11
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    On 12/3/2010 10:05 AM, Kitty wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>> In years past I have made pickled eggs and stored them at room
    >>> temperature with no ill effects. Now they get refrigerated.
    >>> Better safe than sorry, as the saying goes.

    >>
    >> Mine are not refrigerated but they are always stored in a cool dark place
    >>
    >> One more thing... I leave them for around 3 months before we eat them.
    >> --
    >> --https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/

    >
    > oooh, wow. Never thought to keep them that long.
    >
    >
    > OK, now another question? For those vetran picklers someone told me
    > that boiling vinegar reduces the PH. would reducing it raise the PH
    > or is there another way to raise the PH? thanks, kitty
    >

    Why would you want to raise the pH? The lower the pH the more acidic the
    food is and the better it is protected from the ghoulies. If you raise
    it you will have to keep them in the fridge and eat them quickly.

    http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Describe_the_pH_scale

  12. #12
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    Kitty wrote:

    >
    >
    > OK, now another question? For those vetran picklers someone told me
    > that boiling vinegar reduces the PH. would reducing it raise the PH
    > or is there another way to raise the PH? thanks, kitty
    >



    I'm sure someone will address this, but a reminder:

    lower pH = more acidic (stronger acid)

    gloria p

  13. #13
    Sunny Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs + recipe

    On Fri, 3 Dec 2010 07:06:54 -0800 (PST), Kitty <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    >least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    >and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >
    >Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    >degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?



    I always pickle eggs and beets for the holidays. I also ALWAYS
    refridgerate them. Here's my family recipe for pickled eggs and
    beets:


    GRANDMA KERNS' PICKLED EGGS AND BEETS

    12 Hard Boiled Eggs, peeled
    2 15oz. Cans of beets (sliced or whole, your preference. I use
    babies.)
    Sugar
    Cider Vinegar
    3T Pickling Spice

    Open beets and pour and measure liquid into large mixing cup. Pour
    beet juice into a 4-quart saucepan (not aluminum.). Add same volume
    cider vinegar. Add same volume sugar. Stir to dissolve sugar. Add
    the beets and eggs. Tie pickling spice in a cloth bag and add to
    liquid. Bring just to the boil and then transfer to a large glass
    pickle jar, making sure the eggs are completely covered. Cap and when
    cool, refrigerate. They are ready to eat in 5 to 7 days.

    Regards,
    Lou

  14. #14
    Whirled Peas Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    On 12/03/2010 08:05 AM, Kitty wrote:
    >
    > OK, now another question? For those vetran picklers someone told me
    > that boiling vinegar reduces the PH. would reducing it raise the PH
    > or is there another way to raise the PH? thanks, kitty
    >


    "Boiling vinegar reduces the pH" is another way of saying "Boiling
    vinegar increases the acidity". Lower pH = higher acidity.

  15. #15
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Kitty <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    > least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    > and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >
    > Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    > degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?


    <shrugs> I've seen them sitting in gallon jars on bar counters in small
    towns. I don't know if they refrigerate them at the close of business.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  16. #16
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    On 12/3/2010 4:34 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Kitty<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    >> least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    >> and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >>
    >> Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    >> degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?

    >
    > <shrugs> I've seen them sitting in gallon jars on bar counters in small
    > towns. I don't know if they refrigerate them at the close of business.
    >

    Back in my salad days, hic, every bar had a jar of pickled eggs and
    another of pickled sausages sitting on the bar. Used to be free, then a
    nickel each, don't know what they sell for now.

    When I want pickled eggs I pickle them and keep them in the fridge per
    USDA instructions, better safe than sorry. Anyone who has ever had food
    poisoning knows the consequences.

  17. #17
    Zhang Dawei Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > [...]
    > When I want pickled eggs I pickle them and keep them in the fridge per
    > USDA instructions, better safe than sorry. Anyone who has ever had food
    > poisoning knows the consequences.


    Whilst what you say at the end is true, it is not the entire picture,
    because we are in a situation of risk-benefit assessment and management.
    For the record, I have had food poisoning that meant I spent some time
    in hospital, and, as a result of the "one trial learning" this provoke,
    I now cannot eat shellfish without feeling extremely nauseous. I am
    careful not to take undue risks that I assess myself in food preparation
    and storage as a result.

    In order to assess whether it is worth taking the steps of refrigerating
    the eggs after pickling (and thereby taking up enormous room in our
    fridge, as well as contributing to our fuel bill), we first have to know
    what was done to assess the risk of botulism occurring in pickled eggs,
    and that may also depend on the recipe and method used to do the
    pickling. Then we need to know just what was the incidence (or
    probability) of one's pickled eggs being spoilt with botulinus for a
    given recipe, method used for pickling and method of storage. In the
    absence of that information, "better safe than sorry" may mean one takes
    preventative steps that far outway the situation: it may mean taking
    extraordinary means of prevention when one indulges in even more risky
    and actually much more relatively dangerous behaviour (like smoking,
    crossing a busy road, driving without a seatbelt, and so on) which we
    would be better addressing first.

    In a litigious society, one may also be being given this advice as a
    result of some official organization being asked whether it is safe to
    eat pickled eggs which have not been kept in refrigerated conditions,
    and then being overly cautious in the advice offered in order to avoid
    someone getting food poisoning, wanting a lot of money in compensation,
    and having a good chance of succeeding: in other words, the advice may
    not be one based on calculated risks of food-poisoning occurring, but,
    rather, one based on chances of losing enormous amounts of money when
    successfully sued by someone who said they were misled by the advice the
    organization offered. These are different things.

    In other words, we know neither the actual rate of infection with
    botulinus that the official organization had to hand when giving this
    advice (or even that they actually had any clear figure at all), nor the
    pressures it was under in being unduly cautious itself to avoid
    litigation within a society that some would argue is unduly litigious
    and successful litigation results in astronomical fines being levied.
    Furthermore, we don't know the conditions under which testing of pickled
    eggs was done to arrive at any figures that the advice might have been
    based on, to see whether it was tested at "extreme conditions" of an
    unsatisfactory nature, or unsatisfactory "extreme methods" of production
    were used.

    However, some of us do know that we have used a recipe for many years
    and a method of keeping the eggs for many years which has resulted in no
    cases of food poisoning. We can see that many cafes and restaurants or
    food outlets (e.g., pubs and fish-and-chip shops in the UK) continue to
    keep jars of pickled eggs on counters unrefrigerated, without fear of
    being shut down by food inspectors because they do not store the eggs
    "properly" in fridges, and, we have seen some say that this occurs in
    the USA too (which seems to be more litigious-minded in these cases than
    does the UK). So, it seems to some of us that the risk-benefit
    assessments we informally do ourselves indicates we should just carry on
    doing what we have always done.

    --
    Zhang Dawei: Beijing, P.R.China. (Native BrEng Speaker)
    Please use Reply-To header for email address. This will
    remain valid for at least two weeks from date of posting.

  18. #18
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs



    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>,
    > Kitty <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Ok, I know we've had this discussion before, but a group I'm on had at
    >> least one question that seemed to need the expertise of our preservers
    >> and I thought I'd see if anyone knows the answer.
    >>
    >> Basically someone wanted to know if you could pickle eggs to such a
    >> degree that they are safe at room temperature. Anyone know?

    >
    > <shrugs> I've seen them sitting in gallon jars on bar counters in small
    > towns. I don't know if they refrigerate them at the close of business.


    They sit on the counters at fish and chip shops here too. It would seem
    pointless sticking them in a fridge after they have been sitting out most of
    the day.
    --
    --
    https://www.shop.helpforheroes.org.uk/


  19. #19
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    On 12/3/2010 10:08 PM, Zhang Dawei wrote:
    > In article<mMqdnbh5tvU5HWTRnZ2dnUVZ_jadnZ2d@giganews. com>,
    > [email protected] says...
    >> [...]
    >> When I want pickled eggs I pickle them and keep them in the fridge per
    >> USDA instructions, better safe than sorry. Anyone who has ever had food
    >> poisoning knows the consequences.

    >
    > Whilst what you say at the end is true, it is not the entire picture,
    > because we are in a situation of risk-benefit assessment and management.
    > For the record, I have had food poisoning that meant I spent some time
    > in hospital, and, as a result of the "one trial learning" this provoke,
    > I now cannot eat shellfish without feeling extremely nauseous. I am
    > careful not to take undue risks that I assess myself in food preparation
    > and storage as a result.
    >
    > In order to assess whether it is worth taking the steps of refrigerating
    > the eggs after pickling (and thereby taking up enormous room in our
    > fridge, as well as contributing to our fuel bill), we first have to know
    > what was done to assess the risk of botulism occurring in pickled eggs,
    > and that may also depend on the recipe and method used to do the
    > pickling. Then we need to know just what was the incidence (or
    > probability) of one's pickled eggs being spoilt with botulinus for a
    > given recipe, method used for pickling and method of storage. In the
    > absence of that information, "better safe than sorry" may mean one takes
    > preventative steps that far outway the situation: it may mean taking
    > extraordinary means of prevention when one indulges in even more risky
    > and actually much more relatively dangerous behaviour (like smoking,
    > crossing a busy road, driving without a seatbelt, and so on) which we
    > would be better addressing first.
    >
    > In a litigious society, one may also be being given this advice as a
    > result of some official organization being asked whether it is safe to
    > eat pickled eggs which have not been kept in refrigerated conditions,
    > and then being overly cautious in the advice offered in order to avoid
    > someone getting food poisoning, wanting a lot of money in compensation,
    > and having a good chance of succeeding: in other words, the advice may
    > not be one based on calculated risks of food-poisoning occurring, but,
    > rather, one based on chances of losing enormous amounts of money when
    > successfully sued by someone who said they were misled by the advice the
    > organization offered. These are different things.
    >
    > In other words, we know neither the actual rate of infection with
    > botulinus that the official organization had to hand when giving this
    > advice (or even that they actually had any clear figure at all), nor the
    > pressures it was under in being unduly cautious itself to avoid
    > litigation within a society that some would argue is unduly litigious
    > and successful litigation results in astronomical fines being levied.
    > Furthermore, we don't know the conditions under which testing of pickled
    > eggs was done to arrive at any figures that the advice might have been
    > based on, to see whether it was tested at "extreme conditions" of an
    > unsatisfactory nature, or unsatisfactory "extreme methods" of production
    > were used.
    >
    > However, some of us do know that we have used a recipe for many years
    > and a method of keeping the eggs for many years which has resulted in no
    > cases of food poisoning. We can see that many cafes and restaurants or
    > food outlets (e.g., pubs and fish-and-chip shops in the UK) continue to
    > keep jars of pickled eggs on counters unrefrigerated, without fear of
    > being shut down by food inspectors because they do not store the eggs
    > "properly" in fridges, and, we have seen some say that this occurs in
    > the USA too (which seems to be more litigious-minded in these cases than
    > does the UK). So, it seems to some of us that the risk-benefit
    > assessments we informally do ourselves indicates we should just carry on
    > doing what we have always done.
    >


    True, we Americans live in a litigious society. Most of us who have been
    on this newsgroup for years prefer to err on the side of caution, for
    that reason and others. What "Momma" did fifty years ago doesn't meet
    current health standards as established by the U.S. Department of
    Agriculture for home preserved foods. Therefore, many of us prefer to
    send folks with questions to the University of Georgia Food Safety site
    and help to further food safety.

    My point is that home preserved foods, of any kinds, take a large amount
    of effort, and, in many cases money, to put up. Why waste those
    resources with outdated or spurious methods of food preservation. Your
    mileage may vary.

    George Shirley, Native American English speaker <G>

  20. #20
    valereee Guest

    Default Re: Pickling eggs

    Actually, we do. I followed the link to the CDC's report. There's
    been ONE case of botulism from pickled eggs -- literally the report
    covered the FIRST reported case for pickled eggs. The person did
    several things that contributed to the problem. First, he pricked the
    eggs with a toothpick before pouring the vinegar over. Then he stored
    them on the counter in a glass jar where they were exposed to sunlight
    that undoubtedly raised the temperature. Then he started eating them
    right away. The botulism spores were found only in the egg yolks, not
    in the surrounding vinegar, which was acid enough to kill botulism.
    The thought was that by pricking the eggs with the toothpick, he
    introduced botulism to the yolk, which if intact shouldn't have
    contained botulism spores, and that the vinegar didn't penetrate the
    yolks within the amount of time before he started eating them.

    Not saying botulism isn't a horrible disease we should all take steps
    to avoid. But let's assess the risks. ONE case, and the guy just
    didn't do it right.

    Val

    On Dec 3, 11:08*pm, Zhang Dawei <fe...@sibianzhe.com> wrote:

    >
    > In other words, we know neither the actual rate of infection with
    > botulinus that the official organization had to hand when giving this
    > advice (or even that they actually had any clear figure at all), nor the
    > pressures it was under in being unduly cautious itself to avoid
    > litigation within a society that some would argue is unduly litigious
    > and successful litigation results in astronomical fines being levied.
    > Furthermore, we don't know the conditions under which testing of pickled
    > eggs was done to arrive at any figures that the advice might have been
    > based on, to see whether it was tested at "extreme conditions" of an
    > unsatisfactory nature, or unsatisfactory "extreme methods" of production
    > were used.
    >
    > However, some of us do know that we have used a recipe for many years
    > and a method of keeping the eggs for many years which has resulted in no
    > cases of food poisoning. We can see that many cafes and restaurants or
    > food outlets (e.g., pubs and fish-and-chip shops in the UK) continue to
    > keep jars of pickled eggs on counters unrefrigerated, without fear of
    > being shut down by food inspectors because they do not store the eggs
    > "properly" in fridges, and, we have seen some say that this occurs in
    > the USA too (which seems to be more litigious-minded in these cases than
    > does the UK). So, it seems to some of us that the risk-benefit
    > assessments we informally do ourselves indicates we should just carry on
    > doing what we have always done.
    >
    > --
    > Zhang Dawei: Beijing, P.R.China. (Native BrEng Speaker)
    > Please use Reply-To header for email address. This will
    > remain valid for at least two weeks from date of posting.



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