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Thread: That Pickle Crisp stuff

  1. #1
    gloria p Guest

    Default That Pickle Crisp stuff



    George? Barb?

    Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    fine, but the texture was a bit strange.

    This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    slender regular cukes instead.

    Any feedback from experienced users?

    gloria p

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/29/2012 12:43 PM, gloria p wrote:
    >
    >
    > George? Barb?
    >
    > Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    > pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    > to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    > fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    >
    > This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    > them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    > slender regular cukes instead.
    >
    > Any feedback from experienced users?
    >
    > gloria p


    I always wait three to four weeks before sampling, they always came out
    good for me. How long did you wait? According to Ball the minimum is
    three weeks.

  3. #3
    Kathi Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On Wednesday, August 29, 2012 1:43:28 PM UTC-4, gloria p wrote:
    > George? Barb?
    >
    >
    >
    > Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    >
    > pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    >
    > to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    >
    > fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    >
    >
    >
    > This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    >
    > them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    >
    > slender regular cukes instead.
    >
    >
    >
    > Any feedback from experienced users?
    >
    >
    >
    > gloria p


    I have used it with my B&B's, made out of those mini English cukes you see in the grocery store. (I don't grow pickling cukes and the baskets in the store are already soft). I can't say exactly how long waited to try them, but have never had them turn out 'tough'

    Kathi

  4. #4
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/29/2012 3:11 PM, Kathi wrote:
    > On Wednesday, August 29, 2012 1:43:28 PM UTC-4, gloria p wrote:
    >> George? Barb?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    >>
    >> pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    >>
    >> to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    >>
    >> fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    >>
    >> them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    >>
    >> slender regular cukes instead.
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Any feedback from experienced users?
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > I have used it with my B&B's, made out of those mini English cukes you see in the grocery store. (I don't grow pickling cukes and the baskets in the store are already soft). I can't say exactly how long waited to try them, but have never had them turn out 'tough'
    >
    > Kathi
    >

    I have had, upon reflection, pickling cukes that were on the vine to
    long, become tough upon pickling. Discussed this with the Boss Lady and
    she agreed that we had once left the cukes on the vine longer than
    necessary. I really don't know how to judge store bought cukes other
    than I won't buy them if the skins are the least bit darker and
    wrinkled. I want them shiny and firm to the touch.

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    In article <k1lkc0$ddg$[email protected]>,
    gloria p <[email protected]> wrote:

    > George? Barb?
    >
    > Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    > pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    > to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    > fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    >
    > This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    > them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    > slender regular cukes instead.
    >
    > Any feedback from experienced users?
    >
    > gloria p


    George is the fan of it, not me, Kiddo. I used it in a couple jars of
    pickles (dill spears) I put up last year and I am underwhelmed with the
    results. Are you supposed to put it on top or in the bottom. I think I
    put mine in the bottom of the jar, figuring the poured brine would make
    it do something wonderful. <shrug> :-(
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of June 6, 2012

  6. #6
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/29/2012 9:38 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <k1lkc0$ddg$[email protected]>,
    > gloria p <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> George? Barb?
    >>
    >> Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    >> pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    >> to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    >> fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    >>
    >> This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    >> them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    >> slender regular cukes instead.
    >>
    >> Any feedback from experienced users?
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > George is the fan of it, not me, Kiddo. I used it in a couple jars of
    > pickles (dill spears) I put up last year and I am underwhelmed with the
    > results. Are you supposed to put it on top or in the bottom. I think I
    > put mine in the bottom of the jar, figuring the poured brine would make
    > it do something wonderful. <shrug> :-(
    >

    It goes in the jar first, followed by the other stuff, at least that's
    what Ball says and that's the way I do it. Sure beats liming your
    pickles. And, as I keep saying, you have to wait for it to do it's
    magic, three weeks at least.

    The only pickles I made with it that turned out bad were green tomato
    pickles. Don't think it was the PC that did the bad job, I believe
    someone sliced the pickles to thin. Probably me.

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    In article <503f48d9$0$7477$[email protected]> ,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 8/29/2012 9:38 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > > In article <k1lkc0$ddg$[email protected]>,
    > > gloria p <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> George? Barb?
    > >>
    > >> Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    > >> pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    > >> to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    > >> fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    > >>
    > >> This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    > >> them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    > >> slender regular cukes instead.
    > >>
    > >> Any feedback from experienced users?
    > >>
    > >> gloria p

    > >
    > > George is the fan of it, not me, Kiddo. I used it in a couple jars of
    > > pickles (dill spears) I put up last year and I am underwhelmed with the
    > > results. Are you supposed to put it on top or in the bottom. I think I
    > > put mine in the bottom of the jar, figuring the poured brine would make
    > > it do something wonderful. <shrug> :-(
    > >

    > It goes in the jar first, followed by the other stuff, at least that's
    > what Ball says and that's the way I do it. Sure beats liming your
    > pickles. And, as I keep saying, you have to wait for it to do it's
    > magic, three weeks at least.
    >
    > The only pickles I made with it that turned out bad were green tomato
    > pickles. Don't think it was the PC that did the bad job, I believe
    > someone sliced the pickles to thin. Probably me.


    I have no idea what those sunchoke pickles would be like without the
    stuff but they are faboo. I have a pint in the fridge right now. :-)
    Thanks, George.

    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of July 25, 2012

  8. #8
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/30/2012 5:05 AM, George Shirley wrote:

    >> In article <k1lkc0$ddg$[email protected]>,
    >> gloria p <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>


    >>>
    >>> Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    >>> pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    >>> to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    >>> fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    >>>

    >
    >>

    > It goes in the jar first, followed by the other stuff, at least that's
    > what Ball says and that's the way I do it. Sure beats liming your
    > pickles. And, as I keep saying, you have to wait for it to do it's
    > magic, three weeks at least.
    >



    OK, I'll wait the three weeks and hope they go from tough to crisp.

    gloria p


  9. #9
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/30/2012 11:29 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <503f48d9$0$7477$[email protected]> ,
    > George Shirley <gmshirley@sudden[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 8/29/2012 9:38 PM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>> In article <k1lkc0$ddg$[email protected]>,
    >>> gloria p <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> George? Barb?
    >>>>
    >>>> Following George's recommendation I topped off my bread-and-butter
    >>>> pickles with Pickle Crisp this year. I may not have waited long enough
    >>>> to try the first jar. I found them tough rather than crisp. Flavor was
    >>>> fine, but the texture was a bit strange.
    >>>>
    >>>> This is the first time ever that I have used pickling cucumbers to make
    >>>> them and that may have made some of the difference. I usually used
    >>>> slender regular cukes instead.
    >>>>
    >>>> Any feedback from experienced users?
    >>>>
    >>>> gloria p
    >>>
    >>> George is the fan of it, not me, Kiddo. I used it in a couple jars of
    >>> pickles (dill spears) I put up last year and I am underwhelmed with the
    >>> results. Are you supposed to put it on top or in the bottom. I think I
    >>> put mine in the bottom of the jar, figuring the poured brine would make
    >>> it do something wonderful. <shrug> :-(
    >>>

    >> It goes in the jar first, followed by the other stuff, at least that's
    >> what Ball says and that's the way I do it. Sure beats liming your
    >> pickles. And, as I keep saying, you have to wait for it to do it's
    >> magic, three weeks at least.
    >>
    >> The only pickles I made with it that turned out bad were green tomato
    >> pickles. Don't think it was the PC that did the bad job, I believe
    >> someone sliced the pickles to thin. Probably me.

    >
    > I have no idea what those sunchoke pickles would be like without the
    > stuff but they are faboo. I have a pint in the fridge right now. :-)
    > Thanks, George.
    >

    The chokes are making more right now. We may dig them before we move
    just to make some more pickles, and yes, they have Pickle Crisp in the
    jars.

    We just signed the sales contract on our house late this afternoon.
    Luckily our realtor is also a friend, she thinks it will sell quickly
    due to location. There are ten house on our ancient sand dune, we're the
    only FEMA flood zone X (once every 500 years flood) for about fifty
    miles in any direction. Unless someone has a tree house. Believe it or
    not we are twelve feet above sea level here. It's no wonder I get dizzy
    every time I drive over an overpass on the freeway, the altitude gets me.

  10. #10
    songbird Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    George Shirley wrote:
    ....
    > We just signed the sales contract on our house late this afternoon.
    > Luckily our realtor is also a friend, she thinks it will sell quickly
    > due to location. There are ten house on our ancient sand dune, we're the
    > only FEMA flood zone X (once every 500 years flood) for about fifty
    > miles in any direction. Unless someone has a tree house. Believe it or
    > not we are twelve feet above sea level here. It's no wonder I get dizzy
    > every time I drive over an overpass on the freeway, the altitude gets me.


    congrats and very funny George... i'm
    sure you'll be taking your favorite
    plants with you if you can.


    songbird

  11. #11
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    In article <504007f3$0$7647$[email protected]> ,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 8/30/2012 11:29 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > > In article <503f48d9$0$7477$[email protected]> ,


    > > I have no idea what those sunchoke pickles would be like without the
    > > stuff but they are faboo. I have a pint in the fridge right now. :-)
    > > Thanks, George.
    > >

    > The chokes are making more right now. We may dig them before we move
    > just to make some more pickles, and yes, they have Pickle Crisp in the
    > jars.
    >
    > We just signed the sales contract on our house late this afternoon.
    > Luckily our realtor is also a friend, she thinks it will sell quickly
    > due to location. There are ten house on our ancient sand dune, we're the
    > only FEMA flood zone X (once every 500 years flood) for about fifty
    > miles in any direction. Unless someone has a tree house. Believe it or
    > not we are twelve feet above sea level here. It's no wonder I get dizzy
    > every time I drive over an overpass on the freeway, the altitude gets me.


    Good luck, Jorge! I love your house! Good kitchen!
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of July 25, 2012

  12. #12
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/31/2012 7:13 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <504007f3$0$7647$[email protected]> ,
    > George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 8/30/2012 11:29 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>> In article <503f48d9$0$7477$[email protected]> ,

    >
    >>> I have no idea what those sunchoke pickles would be like without the
    >>> stuff but they are faboo. I have a pint in the fridge right now. :-)
    >>> Thanks, George.
    >>>

    >> The chokes are making more right now. We may dig them before we move
    >> just to make some more pickles, and yes, they have Pickle Crisp in the
    >> jars.
    >>
    >> We just signed the sales contract on our house late this afternoon.
    >> Luckily our realtor is also a friend, she thinks it will sell quickly
    >> due to location. There are ten house on our ancient sand dune, we're the
    >> only FEMA flood zone X (once every 500 years flood) for about fifty
    >> miles in any direction. Unless someone has a tree house. Believe it or
    >> not we are twelve feet above sea level here. It's no wonder I get dizzy
    >> every time I drive over an overpass on the freeway, the altitude gets me.

    >
    > Good luck, Jorge! I love your house! Good kitchen!
    >

    My kids think I am weird because we are looking at houses with a large
    kitchen and a nice pantry. Of course they eat out a lot and we cook in
    ourselves.

    This has been a good house Barb, three hurricanes, a tornado, and an ice
    storm didn't bring it down. Thank goodness for good insurance though.

  13. #13
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/31/2012 7:31 AM, George Shirley wrote:

    >>

    > My kids think I am weird because we are looking at houses with a large
    > kitchen and a nice pantry. Of course they eat out a lot and we cook in
    > ourselves.
    >


    Our kids eat out a lot, too. I think it's a generational thing, plus we
    heard a lot about the Depression in our youth and they didn't.

    > This has been a good house Barb, three hurricanes, a tornado, and an ice
    > storm didn't bring it down. Thank goodness for good insurance though.


    Quick and profitable sale vibes, George. I hoe you find a house in TX
    that you both like as well that someone has taken as good care as you
    have before listing.

    gloria p


  14. #14
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 8/31/2012 4:35 PM, gloria p wrote:
    > On 8/31/2012 7:31 AM, George Shirley wrote:
    >
    >>>

    >> My kids think I am weird because we are looking at houses with a large
    >> kitchen and a nice pantry. Of course they eat out a lot and we cook in
    >> ourselves.
    >>

    >
    > Our kids eat out a lot, too. I think it's a generational thing, plus we
    > heard a lot about the Depression in our youth and they didn't.
    >
    >> This has been a good house Barb, three hurricanes, a tornado, and an ice
    >> storm didn't bring it down. Thank goodness for good insurance though.

    >
    > Quick and profitable sale vibes, George. I hoe you find a house in TX
    > that you both like as well that someone has taken as good care as you
    > have before listing.
    >
    > gloria p
    >

    We're mostly looking at newer homes because I no longer get on roof tops
    nor crawl around looking for leaks. With a rebuilt hip Miz Anne doesn't
    either. Actually some homes built this year are cheaper than the older
    homes, primarily because some builder is sitting on a "built it" loan
    and the interest is eating up his profit.

  15. #15
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 9/1/2012 11:15 AM, George Shirley wrote:
    >
    > We're mostly looking at newer homes because I no longer get on roof tops
    > nor crawl around looking for leaks. With a rebuilt hip Miz Anne doesn't
    > either. Actually some homes built this year are cheaper than the older
    > homes, primarily because some builder is sitting on a "built it" loan
    > and the interest is eating up his profit.



    I forget, you looking in Kingwood or in the Livingston area?

    BTW, when I sold my house in Temple, I told the realtor to mention
    "mature fruit trees" in the listing. She thought that was stupid but
    did it anyway, and that's what sold the place. And I felt better
    knowing it would goto someone who would appreciate them and might even
    take care of 'em.

    Bob

  16. #16
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 9/1/2012 10:49 AM, zxcvbob wrote:

    > BTW, when I sold my house in Temple, I told the realtor to mention
    > "mature fruit trees" in the listing. She thought that was stupid but
    > did it anyway, and that's what sold the place. And I felt better
    > knowing it would goto someone who would appreciate them and might even
    > take care of 'em.
    >
    > Bob




    Fruit trees and a garden area would definitely be a major plus for us.
    We've always gardened and had some trees but never in a very friendly
    climate.

    gloria p

  17. #17
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 9/1/2012 11:49 AM, zxcvbob wrote:
    > On 9/1/2012 11:15 AM, George Shirley wrote:
    >>
    >> We're mostly looking at newer homes because I no longer get on roof tops
    >> nor crawl around looking for leaks. With a rebuilt hip Miz Anne doesn't
    >> either. Actually some homes built this year are cheaper than the older
    >> homes, primarily because some builder is sitting on a "built it" loan
    >> and the interest is eating up his profit.

    >
    >
    > I forget, you looking in Kingwood or in the Livingston area?
    >
    > BTW, when I sold my house in Temple, I told the realtor to mention
    > "mature fruit trees" in the listing. She thought that was stupid but
    > did it anyway, and that's what sold the place. And I felt better
    > knowing it would goto someone who would appreciate them and might even
    > take care of 'em.
    >
    > Bob

    We decided to move near our daughter so it will be Tomball. She will
    probably end up our caregiver when we get to old to function on our own.

    I gave the realtor a list of the fruit trees, a drawing of the herb
    garden with each area marked as to herb there. I also have waterproof
    tags for the fruit trees that I will tie on as soon as this little
    rainstorm passes through. She also got a list of when appliances were
    installed, the company that maintains them and the price we pay for
    maintenance. A file folder with the manuals and warranties of all the
    appliances we're leaving behind. Another list of the annual cost of
    natural gas and electricity, what the city charges for water/sewer/trash
    pickup, etc. A map that shows the underground piping and electrical
    conduit I installed myself. A list of trusted craftsmen and their
    trades, where the farmers market is located, etc. We've been doing our
    homework on this for a long time.

    As it turns out we can get a bigger, newer home in Tomball with lower
    taxes than we can in Kingwood. Kids nixed Livingston because it would be
    to "far" for them to visit often. Personally I thought that was a plus.
    I was looking a nice older home backed up on a stocked fifty acre lake,
    looked ideal to me and was fairly close to a place I used to deer hunt
    on. At least there are lots of art and antique galleries in Tomball so
    maybe we can sell some of Miz Anne's paintings. Just put a pickup load
    of paintings and art supplies in the climate controlled storage locker,
    just finished when it started raining. Could haul another load but what
    the heck, I'm soaked with sweat already. This moving stuff is tough on
    old people. Particularly since, in 47 years in the oil patch, we never
    moved ourselves. Our first home we moved into with the trunk and back
    seat of a 1957 Chevrolet Del Rey four door sedan. After that some moving
    company moved us as we traveled around the world. Moving yourself is a
    big pain, particularly since I will be 73 years old in 22 more days.

  18. #18
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: That Pickle Crisp stuff

    On 9/1/2012 12:53 PM, gloria p wrote:
    > On 9/1/2012 10:49 AM, zxcvbob wrote:
    >
    >> BTW, when I sold my house in Temple, I told the realtor to mention
    >> "mature fruit trees" in the listing. She thought that was stupid but
    >> did it anyway, and that's what sold the place. And I felt better
    >> knowing it would goto someone who would appreciate them and might even
    >> take care of 'em.
    >>
    >> Bob

    >
    >
    >
    > Fruit trees and a garden area would definitely be a major plus for us.
    > We've always gardened and had some trees but never in a very friendly
    > climate.
    >
    > gloria p

    I wouldn't call our area a friendly climate. Peach borers just finished
    killing the second peach tree I've planted here in twenty years. We get
    one or two crops and then they're gone. Just heard from another gardener
    that planting onion chives around the base of the tree keeps the borers
    out, may plant another one when we find a home.

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