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Thread: Peppers and peaches

  1. #1
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Peppers and peaches


    Dear daughter and I made the annual trek to a garden center (with a
    large Hispanic customer base) to buy roasted chiles for the freezer.
    They sell by the bushel. We bought Anaheims and Anchos and spent the
    next 2 1/2 hours slipping off the skins,removing most of the seeds, and
    dividing them into vacuum sealed bags, double bagged into larger
    ziplocks so everything in the freezer doesn't taste like chiles. We
    will share with her brother, too. Both of my kids cook much "hotter"
    than I do.

    I am looking forward to cooler weather for green chile, red chile,
    soups, stews and roasts. Much of our cooking has been done on the gas
    grill this summer because it has been SO HOT.

    I also bought 20 lb. of small peaches which looked very ripe but
    weren't. Dear Husband helped me blanch them to remove the skin for
    freezing but even after extending the blanching and ice water bath
    only about 4 of the fruit gave up the skins easily. They were not ripe
    enough, making me glad I used a sugar and FruitFresh treatment. That
    was disappointing because Colorado peaches can be wonderful when ripe.

    I thought about peach jam but we have more jam in the basement pantry
    than we can use in multiple lifetimes.

    My neighbor stopped by yesterday when we were working in the yard and
    offered me ALL of her Concord grapes. What will I do with mine (the
    ones the raccoons don't get?) Maybe juice. Sigh.

    I thought I was done for the season. :-(

    gloria p

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    On 9/7/2010 9:22 PM, gloria.p wrote:
    >
    > Dear daughter and I made the annual trek to a garden center (with a
    > large Hispanic customer base) to buy roasted chiles for the freezer.
    > They sell by the bushel. We bought Anaheims and Anchos and spent the
    > next 2 1/2 hours slipping off the skins,removing most of the seeds, and
    > dividing them into vacuum sealed bags, double bagged into larger
    > ziplocks so everything in the freezer doesn't taste like chiles.


    I have never had a problem with one item contaminating other items
    through a vacuum sealed bag. What's up with that? Also I am envious that
    you can get roasted chiles locally. We can get fresh chiles and dried
    chiles but that's about it. When we moved here 22 years ago there were
    NO Hispanics in the area now there are tons. Maybe we will get a Mexican
    market sometime soon. I know the Mexican restaurants have multiplied
    ten-fold in the last two years, some good, some not.

    We will
    > share with her brother, too. Both of my kids cook much "hotter" than I do.
    >
    > I am looking forward to cooler weather for green chile, red chile,
    > soups, stews and roasts. Much of our cooking has been done on the gas
    > grill this summer because it has been SO HOT.


    I take it you don't have air conditioning? We couldn't live here without
    it so I find it strange that everybody doesn't have it.

    >
    > I also bought 20 lb. of small peaches which looked very ripe but
    > weren't. Dear Husband helped me blanch them to remove the skin for
    > freezing but even after extending the blanching and ice water bath
    > only about 4 of the fruit gave up the skins easily. They were not ripe
    > enough, making me glad I used a sugar and FruitFresh treatment. That
    > was disappointing because Colorado peaches can be wonderful when ripe.


    That's typical for store bought fruit around here too.

    >
    > I thought about peach jam but we have more jam in the basement pantry
    > than we can use in multiple lifetimes.


    Think food bank. I gave a bunch to Abraham's Tent one year, they feed
    needy people. They actually brought me the jars and rings back one month
    later. Really nice people at these places.

    >
    > My neighbor stopped by yesterday when we were working in the yard and
    > offered me ALL of her Concord grapes. What will I do with mine (the
    > ones the raccoons don't get?) Maybe juice. Sigh.


    Well, you eat all you can, can all you can, and the coons get the rest.
    Does that make sense?

    >
    > I thought I was done for the season. :-(
    >
    > gloria p


    There is no season in home preserving to my knowledge, when you gets it
    you cans it.


  3. #3
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    In article <i66s11$7n6$[email protected]>,
    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I thought about peach jam but we have more jam in the basement pantry
    > than we can use in multiple lifetimes.


    > gloria p


    Make some peachy-pepper jam.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    A few pics from the Fair are here:
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254

  4. #4
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    In article <[email protected]>,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Think food bank. I gave a bunch to Abraham's Tent one year, they feed
    > needy people. They actually brought me the jars and rings back one month
    > later. Really nice people at these places.


    Lots of food shelves won't accept homemade food, Jorge.
    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    A few pics from the Fair are here:
    http://gallery.me.com/barbschaller#100254

  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    On 9/8/2010 10:59 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article<[email protected]>,
    > George Shirley<[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Think food bank. I gave a bunch to Abraham's Tent one year, they feed
    >> needy people. They actually brought me the jars and rings back one month
    >> later. Really nice people at these places.

    >
    > Lots of food shelves won't accept homemade food, Jorge.


    This one probably wouldn't either but I have worked with them a time or two.

  6. #6
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    George Shirley wrote:
    > On 9/7/2010 9:22 PM, gloria.p wrote:


    >
    > I have never had a problem with one item contaminating other items
    > through a vacuum sealed bag. What's up with that? Also I am envious that
    > you can get roasted chiles locally. We can get fresh chiles and dried
    > chiles but that's about it.



    Our garden center and quite a few other places (including temporary
    empty-lot vegetable stands have big, rotating mesh drums with propane
    burners under them. You can smell the roasting for blocks. When each
    batch is done they transfer them to heavy plastic bags to sweat and
    loosen the skins. I don't think it would be too hard to do on a gas
    grill, but they do such a good job, why bother.

    >> I am looking forward to cooler weather for green chile, red chile,
    >> soups, stews and roasts. Much of our cooking has been done on the gas
    >> grill this summer because it has been SO HOT.

    >
    > I take it you don't have air conditioning? We couldn't live here without
    > it so I find it strange that everybody doesn't have it.



    ActuallY we Do HAVE A/C. It was one of my secret criteria when we were
    house hunting here, but DH doesn't like to run up the electric bill so
    we use it sparingly, around 11AM-5PM when it begins to cool off
    outdoors. (That's one of Colorado's benefits, it cools down ~20 degrees
    as soon as the sun sets.)


    >
    >>
    >> I thought about peach jam but we have more jam in the basement pantry
    >> than we can use in multiple lifetimes.

    >
    > Think food bank. I gave a bunch to Abraham's Tent one year, they feed
    > needy people. They actually brought me the jars and rings back one month
    > later. Really nice people at these places.
    >


    I am sure, but the food banks are picky around here and are suspicious
    of home made anything. I end up giving it to neighbors. Took jars of
    apricot jam to my doc and his assistant today when I went in for my
    annual physical. They were astonished that I had made it myself from
    our own trees. (City folk...)

    >
    >>
    >> I thought I was done for the season. :-(
    >>
    >>

    >
    > There is no season in home preserving to my knowledge, when you gets it
    > you cans it.
    >



    Seems I remember hearing that as Melba's Mom's motto. Thanks for the
    reminder.

    gloria p

  7. #7
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    On 9/8/2010 2:26 PM, gloria.p wrote:
    > George Shirley wrote:
    >> On 9/7/2010 9:22 PM, gloria.p wrote:

    >
    >>
    >> I have never had a problem with one item contaminating other items
    >> through a vacuum sealed bag. What's up with that? Also I am envious
    >> that you can get roasted chiles locally. We can get fresh chiles and
    >> dried chiles but that's about it.

    >
    >
    > Our garden center and quite a few other places (including temporary
    > empty-lot vegetable stands have big, rotating mesh drums with propane
    > burners under them. You can smell the roasting for blocks. When each
    > batch is done they transfer them to heavy plastic bags to sweat and
    > loosen the skins. I don't think it would be too hard to do on a gas
    > grill, but they do such a good job, why bother.
    >
    >>> I am looking forward to cooler weather for green chile, red chile,
    >>> soups, stews and roasts. Much of our cooking has been done on the gas
    >>> grill this summer because it has been SO HOT.

    >>
    >> I take it you don't have air conditioning? We couldn't live here
    >> without it so I find it strange that everybody doesn't have it.

    >
    >
    > ActuallY we Do HAVE A/C. It was one of my secret criteria when we were
    > house hunting here, but DH doesn't like to run up the electric bill so
    > we use it sparingly, around 11AM-5PM when it begins to cool off
    > outdoors. (That's one of Colorado's benefits, it cools down ~20 degrees
    > as soon as the sun sets.)


    Total utility bills for August ran us about $189.00. That includes
    electricity, natural gas, trash pick-up weekly, water, and sewer. All
    for a 2000 square foot house. August is typically our hottest month but
    we did have several fairly cool days this year. Our average electric
    bill, year around, is only about $75.00 a month. The city utilities for
    trash, water, and sewer, no limit on water, runs $43 a month. We have
    pretty decent prices for utilities here.

    I wish we cooled down ~20 degrees when the sun sets. If you take into
    consideration the heat index we do drop that far but, I have seen nights
    running in the high eighties if there is no wind that night.

    >
    >
    >>
    >>>
    >>> I thought about peach jam but we have more jam in the basement pantry
    >>> than we can use in multiple lifetimes.

    >>
    >> Think food bank. I gave a bunch to Abraham's Tent one year, they feed
    >> needy people. They actually brought me the jars and rings back one
    >> month later. Really nice people at these places.
    >>

    >
    > I am sure, but the food banks are picky around here and are suspicious
    > of home made anything. I end up giving it to neighbors. Took jars of
    > apricot jam to my doc and his assistant today when I went in for my
    > annual physical. They were astonished that I had made it myself from our
    > own trees. (City folk...)
    >
    >>
    >>>
    >>> I thought I was done for the season. :-(
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> There is no season in home preserving to my knowledge, when you gets
    >> it you cans it.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Seems I remember hearing that as Melba's Mom's motto. Thanks for the
    > reminder.
    >
    > gloria p


    I guess we're old fashioned, both raised out in the country on acreage,
    not on lots in town. I don't remember when my family didn't have a
    garden. We lived in town until I was almost ten years old and we had a
    garden and fruit trees in the backyard and went berry picking in the
    country in the berry season. Miz Anne grew up on nineteen acres with the
    two parents and five kids, you know they had a big garden, four apple
    trees, two pear trees, raspberries, asparagus patch, all of that.

    I guess putting your own food up is a mindset you get into so deep that
    you don't realize we home food preservers are almost a dying breed. I
    think with the economy being what it is more people are going that way.
    I seem to spend an inordinate amount of time trying to teach
    well-meaning friends that great grannies canning habits can kill them
    either quickly or very slowly and painfully. The horror, the horror.


  8. #8
    ST Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches


    >> it so I find it strange that everybody doesn't have it.


    >ActuallY we Do HAVE A/C. It was one of my secret criteria when we were
    >house hunting here, but DH doesn't like to run up the electric bill so
    >we use it sparingly, around 11AM-5PM when it begins to cool off
    >outdoors. (That's one of Colorado's benefits, it cools down ~20 degrees
    >as soon as the sun sets.)


    It's to complexicated a subject for me to try to tackle, but only running the AC
    some of the time and relying on cool nights to cool the house can actually run
    up your cooling costs.
    All I'm willing to try to remember on that subject is when air cools it still has
    the same amount of water in it, so if you let in a bunch of really wet air during
    the night to cool the house _maybe_ you shouldn'ta 'cause the AC can't actually
    start lowering the air temp until it's got the air dry enough.

    >>> I thought I was done for the season. :-(


    ;p
    Yeah, and then a deer leeps jumps thru your window. Can't let that venison go
    to waste.
    >> There is no season in home preserving to my knowledge, when you gets it
    >> you cans it.
    >>

    >
    >
    >Seems I remember hearing that as Melba's Mom's motto. Thanks for the
    >reminder.
    >
    >gloria p


    Shawn

  9. #9
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    George Shirley wrote:

    >
    > I guess putting your own food up is a mindset you get into so deep that
    > you don't realize we home food preservers are almost a dying breed. I
    > think with the economy being what it is more people are going that way.
    > I seem to spend an inordinate amount of time trying to teach
    > well-meaning friends that great grannies canning habits can kill them
    > either quickly or very slowly and painfully. The horror, the horror.
    >



    I can't even GET my friends that far. They think any kind of preserving
    is Hard Work and wouldn't even attempt it. The reaction to my jam
    making is equivalent to what they'd say if I perfected cold fusion at
    home. Folks have gotten so spoiled and soft in the past 50-60 years.

    gloria p

  10. #10
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    ST wrote:

    >
    > It's to complexicated a subject for me to try to tackle, but only running the AC
    > some of the time and relying on cool nights to cool the house can actually run
    > up your cooling costs.
    > All I'm willing to try to remember on that subject is when air cools it still has
    > the same amount of water in it, so if you let in a bunch of really wet air during
    > the night to cool the house _maybe_ you shouldn'ta 'cause the AC can't actually
    > start lowering the air temp until it's got the air dry enough.
    >



    Shawn:

    Humidity isn't really a problem in Colorado. Last week we had a couple
    of days when the humidity was 6 to 7%.

    My husband closely watches the delta between indoor and outdoor
    temperatures and when it's more than a couple of degrees cooler outside,
    the windows and doors get opened and the central a/c turned off. Much
    of the time it works well.

    My complaint was that it was hot enough this summer that, after we
    finished painting the house, I had no desire to go outdoors the rest of
    the summer. The gardens is evidence, a mass of weeds.

    gloria p

  11. #11
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Peppers and peaches

    On 9/9/2010 4:32 PM, gloria.p wrote:
    > ST wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> It's to complexicated a subject for me to try to tackle, but only
    >> running the AC
    >> some of the time and relying on cool nights to cool the house can
    >> actually run
    >> up your cooling costs.
    >> All I'm willing to try to remember on that subject is when air cools
    >> it still has
    >> the same amount of water in it, so if you let in a bunch of really wet
    >> air during
    >> the night to cool the house _maybe_ you shouldn'ta 'cause the AC can't
    >> actually
    >> start lowering the air temp until it's got the air dry enough.
    >>

    >
    >
    > Shawn:
    >
    > Humidity isn't really a problem in Colorado. Last week we had a couple
    > of days when the humidity was 6 to 7%.
    >
    > My husband closely watches the delta between indoor and outdoor
    > temperatures and when it's more than a couple of degrees cooler outside,
    > the windows and doors get opened and the central a/c turned off. Much
    > of the time it works well.
    >
    > My complaint was that it was hot enough this summer that, after we
    > finished painting the house, I had no desire to go outdoors the rest of
    > the summer. The gardens is evidence, a mass of weeds.
    >
    > gloria p


    Our house hasn't been painted since 1997 and still looks pretty good. If
    we do indeed decide to sell next year I will have it painted. Are you
    looking for a job that would include room and board? <G>

    A couple of weeks ago we got several days where the night and early
    morning temps were in the low seventies. Since our thermostat is set at
    80F during the summer we just opened the windows and patio doors and let
    the coolth creep in. Left them open until the AC cranked up because the
    temp had risen. Saved a bunch of money on the electric bill.

    Our winter temp is set at 68F. My attitude is you can take clothes off
    in the summer and put them on in the winter if it saves a buck or two.
    I've been in houses in the winter that were so hot and stuffy I couldn't
    stay long. Don't understand that. Also don't understand fire places, you
    get a net loss of heat from the house if the fireplace is working.

    Friends have a modern wood stove that heats their whole house, about
    1200 square feet. Put a couple of logs in before bedtime and they last
    until reveille the next morning. If I was starting over again I would
    have one.

  12. #12
    rayroberts is offline Assistant Cook
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default

    Lol. I have nothing really to add to the conversation. I was just intrigued by the combination of peaches and peppers together in the blog title. Lol. I ended up reading this whole page and found it enjoyable. So easy to spend time on here...

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