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Thread: Opportunity?

  1. #1
    gloria p Guest

    Default Opportunity?



    Reading the last few posts made me wonder--is there an opportunity for
    income for someone to sell both canning supplies and preserving books
    at local farmer's markets? (I'm not about to do it, but I'm intrigued
    at the thought of that kind of one-stop-shopping.)

    gloria p

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?

    On 2/10/2012 5:00 PM, gloria p wrote:
    >
    >
    > Reading the last few posts made me wonder--is there an opportunity for
    > income for someone to sell both canning supplies and preserving books
    > at local farmer's markets? (I'm not about to do it, but I'm intrigued at
    > the thought of that kind of one-stop-shopping.)
    >
    > gloria p

    We hit four or five local farmer's markets around here and I've never
    seen anyone selling such. Most people here just go to Walmart and buy
    the Ball Blue Book and whatever they need at the time.

    For an area with a large heavy industrial base we do have a lot of
    farmers and gardeners.

    Personally I haunt the thrift stores, going at least twice a month. I
    have bought so many jars, etc. at most of them they keep a list of what
    I'm looking for handy, one outfit even calls me if they get something on
    the list.

    As to money and opportunity in such, there are innumerable web sites
    that sell those things, generally at a higher price than the local
    stores. We have three hardware stores around here that are very old,
    still belong to the same families, and they stock canning supplies. Once
    again everything is high priced today so I still haunt church sales,
    thrift sales, and even garage sales that are in areas associated with
    farm folk.

    If you think there is an opportunity in your area do a little research,
    ie. do a survey amongst you possible clients, then go for it. Be aware
    that you will have to buy in bulk in order to make a decent profit.

  3. #3
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?


    > We hit four or five local farmer's markets around here and I've never
    > seen anyone selling such. Most people here just go to Walmart and buy


    >
    > Personally I haunt the thrift stores, going at least twice a month. I
    > have bought so many jars, etc. at most of them they keep a list of what
    > I'm looking for handy, one outfit even calls me if they get something on
    > the list.


    Jars in grocery stores or places like Big Lots have averaged ~$6-7 a
    case. Thrift stores here usually charge $.50 apiece. Yard sales can
    provide incredible deals, like $1 a case from people who are getting rid
    of "grandma's junk" and they often will throw in more than one case.

    Perhaps we are just in an expensive area, but thrift shops are not as
    great a bargain as they used to be. :-(

    gloria p

  4. #4
    Shawn Martin Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?

    On 2/10/2012 5:00 PM, gloria p wrote:
    >
    >
    > Reading the last few posts made me wonder--is there an opportunity for
    > income for someone to sell both canning supplies and preserving books
    > at local farmer's markets? (I'm not about to do it, but I'm intrigued at
    > the thought of that kind of one-stop-shopping.)
    >
    > gloria p


    That's a great question. I think a small display next to your usual
    wares might be successful.

    Bear in mind that laws vary from state to state. Here in TX, you can
    sell at farmer's markets:

    Home grown produce
    Home canned goods
    Dressed poultry and rabbits (provided that they were raised and
    processed at your premises.)

    Other states laws will vary. I think no state would have a problem with
    the sale of non-edible wares.

  5. #5
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?

    On Fri, 10 Feb 2012 16:00:41 -0700, gloria p <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >
    >
    >Reading the last few posts made me wonder--is there an opportunity for
    >income for someone to sell both canning supplies and preserving books
    >at local farmer's markets? (I'm not about to do it, but I'm intrigued
    >at the thought of that kind of one-stop-shopping.)
    >
    >gloria p



    I'm not sure that it would be worthwhile unless you found a great deal
    on the jars. I'm thinking that anyone buying in large enough
    quantities already has the equipment and the others wouldn't have the
    vaguest idea what to do with them. The jars would take up a lot of
    room for the vendors to store at home and space in the trucks. Around
    here you can get the jars & books at most of the grocery and hardware
    stores in season. Walmart, Big Lots and Lowe's hardware also have
    them in season. My local grocery store carries all the supplies
    except books year around so if I run out of something when I want to
    can out of season, I am not stuck.

    I haven't read the regulations for this county but the markets here do
    not seem to have anything that was not grown or made by the vendor in
    the area. The larger markets that I have been to in Chapel Hill and
    Greensboro, NC did not appear to have anything that was not grown or
    made in the area by the vendor.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  6. #6
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?

    gloria p wrote:
    >
    > Reading the last few posts made me wonder--is there an opportunity for
    > income for someone to sell both canning supplies and preserving books
    > at local farmer's markets? (I'm not about to do it, but I'm intrigued
    > at the thought of that kind of one-stop-shopping.)


    I've seen folks doing that at farmers markets in California so it is an
    established practice. As Shawn Martin posted check the local laws. In
    some states a farmers market may have special restrictions while in
    other states they will basically be unrestricted flea markets under a
    different label.

  7. #7
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?

    On 2/10/2012 7:51 PM, gloria p wrote:
    >
    >> We hit four or five local farmer's markets around here and I've never
    >> seen anyone selling such. Most people here just go to Walmart and buy

    >
    >>
    >> Personally I haunt the thrift stores, going at least twice a month. I
    >> have bought so many jars, etc. at most of them they keep a list of what
    >> I'm looking for handy, one outfit even calls me if they get something on
    >> the list.

    >
    > Jars in grocery stores or places like Big Lots have averaged ~$6-7 a
    > case. Thrift stores here usually charge $.50 apiece. Yard sales can
    > provide incredible deals, like $1 a case from people who are getting rid
    > of "grandma's junk" and they often will throw in more than one case.
    >
    > Perhaps we are just in an expensive area, but thrift shops are not as
    > great a bargain as they used to be. :-(
    >
    > gloria p

    I've a twenty-year relationship at the one I go to most, have done
    volunteer work there a time or two also. They still don't charge an arm
    and a leg for things that are given to them to sell.

    We've been cleaning out the house in preparation for remodeling and
    moving back to Texas. My weight has been up and down, sometimes as much
    as 100 lbs down. Therefore I had at least three different sizes of
    clothing, some of which may have been worn once or twice. Believe it or
    not there are a lot of short, stocky men in this area. Folks at the
    thrift store tell me that whatever clothing I bring in sells quickly.
    Shoot, I went in there a week ago and there was a cotton coverall that
    just fit me nicely, paid $5.00 for it and use it when I'm painting
    around here or crawling around in the attic.

    My best deals have been at church sales, once bought over 200 jars for 5
    cents each, they just wanted to get rid of them. First time I ever
    filled the pickup bed with jars, still have a lot of them. I seldom go
    to garage sales anymore, most folks around here think their throw-aways
    are worth a fortune. We decided not to have garage sales and just give
    stuff to the thrift store and take a write-off for the value against our
    taxes. Works for us.

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?

    In article <jh47j2$gp$[email protected]>, gloria p <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Reading the last few posts made me wonder--is there an opportunity for
    > income for someone to sell both canning supplies and preserving books
    > at local farmer's markets? (I'm not about to do it, but I'm intrigued
    > at the thought of that kind of one-stop-shopping.)
    >
    > gloria p


    I'm guessing it would depend on the rules of any given market. St.
    Paul's farmers markets require the produce be produced within a 50-mile
    (I think) radius of the main market. Interesting idea, though.
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Opportunity?

    In article <jh4hjd$la7$[email protected]>,
    gloria p <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Perhaps we are just in an expensive area, but thrift shops are not as
    > great a bargain as they used to be. :-(
    >
    > gloria p


    True here, too. I can actually buy a case of new jars (with rings and
    lids) for less than 12 jars (often without a ring, never with a lid I'd
    use), one at a time, from the two secondhand stores near me.
    --
    Barb,
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller September 5, 2011

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