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Thread: Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip

  1. #1
    shorti Guest

    Default Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip

    I am going on a two week canoe trip in about a month.
    All ice, in even the best coolers, would be gone in just a few days, so I
    won't be taking any.
    I will have several types of jerky, and dried fried ground beef.
    However, personal experience says jerky gets boring and the dried ground
    beef is just OK.

    Our fore fathers used to keep meats around for a month or two. How?

    There was a fiction writer, Jack London, that used the real life of the far
    north as the basis of his stories.
    In one, an accountant or something like one, got fed up with his boss, and
    went on a canoe trip north for a
    few months. He had what he called bacon for at least a few weeks until it
    was gone.
    Bacon. What kind of bacon would last that long? Not the limp junk we have
    now, that’s for sure.
    How was it preserved? How do I get a butcher to make some?

    What other kinds of non-cooled preserved meats could I take?

    Or is it just a pipe dream? Am I stuck with jerky and dried hamburger?

    Tom




  2. #2
    Shawn Martin Guest

    Default Re: Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip


    "shorti" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]. .
    > I am going on a two week canoe trip in about a month.
    > All ice, in even the best coolers, would be gone in just a few days, so I
    > won't be taking any.
    > I will have several types of jerky, and dried fried ground beef.
    > However, personal experience says jerky gets boring and the dried ground
    > beef is just OK.
    >
    > Our fore fathers used to keep meats around for a month or two. How?
    >
    > There was a fiction writer, Jack London, that used the real life of the
    > far north as the basis of his stories.
    > In one, an accountant or something like one, got fed up with his boss, and
    > went on a canoe trip north for a
    > few months. He had what he called bacon for at least a few weeks until it
    > was gone.
    > Bacon. What kind of bacon would last that long? Not the limp junk we have
    > now, that’s for sure.
    > How was it preserved? How do I get a butcher to make some?
    >
    > What other kinds of non-cooled preserved meats could I take?
    >
    > Or is it just a pipe dream? Am I stuck with jerky and dried hamburger?
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    >
    >


    The bacon used by Jack London's peers wouldn't be recognizable by today's
    folk.
    Take a pork belly, douse it in sodium nitrite, and hang it up to dry.
    Contrary to what most people believe, smoke was used to keep flies from
    laying eggs on the meat, not for any real flavor profile.

    (My grandmother cooked on a wood stove her whole life, and took pride that
    nothing came out smelling of smoke.)

    The bacon was dried much more than today's product. Nitrites guaranteed
    that botulism spores didn't grow on the meat, but really didn't keep other
    bacteria and fungus from growing. The key was to get it dry, as fast as
    possible.

    The most common practice would be to have the meat wrapped in paper, to let
    it breathe. Keeping the surface dry would help the preservation. (Think of
    the consistency of a country ham. the kind that you have to soak overnight
    before cooking) (Or jerky)



  3. #3
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip

    shorti wrote:
    >
    > However, personal experience says jerky gets boring and the dried ground
    > beef is just OK.
    >
    > Our fore fathers used to keep meats around for a month or two. How?


    Not that it will help the boredom issue, but pemmican was a standard.
    Jerk meat until so dry it gets crispy. Mash into a powder. Melt
    rendered fat to liquid. Mix half powdered meat and half powdered fat
    and pour into bars. Halves by eight or volume whichever you feel like.
    Add dried berries if you have any. Keeps for months. If you're still
    eating it after a month you'll be so bored you'll be shooting any bird
    you see for fresh food, but pemmican is extremely nutitrious as base of
    a near zero carb eating plan while travelling.

    > What other kinds of non-cooled preserved meats could I take?


    Salami. Beef summer sausage. Landjaegers. There are all sorts of
    dried sausages that will keep. Plus many types of hard cheeses, dried
    fruits. The hard part will be keeping it dry while on the canoe if you
    do any rapids running or other adventurous stunts.

    Plus troll for fish while you row. Fish caught fresh that day will be
    wonderful for dinner.

  4. #4
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip

    On 4/2/2012 12:04 AM, shorti wrote:

    > Bacon. What kind of bacon would last that long? Not the limp junk we
    > have now, that’s for sure.
    > How was it preserved? How do I get a butcher to make some?
    >
    > What other kinds of non-cooled preserved meats could I take?
    >
    > Or is it just a pipe dream? Am I stuck with jerky and dried hamburger?
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >



    Most stores now carry pre-cooked unrefrigerated bacon. I don't know
    whether it is supposed to be refrigerated after opening. You could
    always take Spam, Vienna Sausage, or some of the many freeze-dried
    products available at stores that specialize in camping and hiking.
    Peanut butter, nuts, and reconstituted dried eggs would provide protein,
    too.

    gloria p



  5. #5
    Drew Lawson Guest

    Default Re: Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip

    In article <[email protected]>
    "shorti" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >There was a fiction writer, Jack London, that used the real life of the far
    >north as the basis of his stories.
    >In one, an accountant or something like one, got fed up with his boss, and
    >went on a canoe trip north for a
    >few months. He had what he called bacon for at least a few weeks until it
    >was gone.
    >Bacon. What kind of bacon would last that long? Not the limp junk we have
    >now, that’s for sure.


    Bacon curing changed significantly around the time of WW2 or soon
    after. The current process is much faster (allowing a larger and
    more affordable supply), but yields (as I am told, I don't go back
    that far) a much wetter result that doesn't last as well.

    But mainly, these "meat around for months" forms of meat would not
    meet today's standards of speedy meal preparation. For example,
    I've been told by more than one source that a *truely* traditionally
    preserved Virginia ham should be soaked for at least 12 hours before
    cooking. Otherwise you have pork flavored salty granite.

    Just as well. You had to soak the beans that long as well.


    >How was it preserved? How do I get a butcher to make some?


    Salt and dehydration.

    You may be able to get some 1930's type bacon from a suitably focused
    rural group (Amish, etc). But I would expect that even that won't
    get you Daniel Boone era meat, even if you really wanted it.

    Hard sausages (such as salami) also tended to be preservation forms.
    I'm not recommending them without refrigeration, but that used to
    be how things were done.


    >What other kinds of non-cooled preserved meats could I take?


    Freeze-dried camping and/or survivalist supplies would be my first
    guess.

    >Or is it just a pipe dream? Am I stuck with jerky and dried hamburger?
    >
    >Tom
    >
    >
    >



    --
    Drew Lawson
    "Please understand that we are considerably less interested
    in you than you are."
    -- Madeleine Page, on the deep truths of alt.folklore.urban

  6. #6
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip

    shorti wrote:
    > I am going on a two week canoe trip in about a month.
    > All ice, in even the best coolers, would be gone in just a few days, so
    > I won't be taking any.
    > I will have several types of jerky, and dried fried ground beef.
    > However, personal experience says jerky gets boring and the dried ground
    > beef is just OK.
    >
    > Our fore fathers used to keep meats around for a month or two. How?
    >
    > There was a fiction writer, Jack London, that used the real life of the
    > far north as the basis of his stories.
    > In one, an accountant or something like one, got fed up with his boss,
    > and went on a canoe trip north for a
    > few months. He had what he called bacon for at least a few weeks until
    > it was gone.
    > Bacon. What kind of bacon would last that long? Not the limp junk we
    > have now, that’s for sure.
    > How was it preserved? How do I get a butcher to make some?
    >
    > What other kinds of non-cooled preserved meats could I take?
    >
    > Or is it just a pipe dream? Am I stuck with jerky and dried hamburger?
    >
    > Tom
    >
    >
    >



    Hard salami -- including pepperoni, and especially Landjägers.
    Sharp cheddar cheese.
    Catch fresh fish for variety.

    Daughter and I went car-camping a few years ago and mostly ate dried
    sausage, bread, and dried fruit (and coffee) for 3 weeks. That's not
    really what we intended to do, we just bought too much really good
    sausage sticks, didn't eat much, and didn't get tired of it.

    -Bob

  7. #7
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Meat for two week -no ice- canoe trip

    On 4/2/2012 2:03 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
    > shorti wrote:
    >> I am going on a two week canoe trip in about a month.
    >> All ice, in even the best coolers, would be gone in just a few days,
    >> so I won't be taking any.
    >> I will have several types of jerky, and dried fried ground beef.
    >> However, personal experience says jerky gets boring and the dried
    >> ground beef is just OK.
    >>
    >> Our fore fathers used to keep meats around for a month or two. How?
    >>
    >> There was a fiction writer, Jack London, that used the real life of
    >> the far north as the basis of his stories.
    >> In one, an accountant or something like one, got fed up with his boss,
    >> and went on a canoe trip north for a
    >> few months. He had what he called bacon for at least a few weeks until
    >> it was gone.
    >> Bacon. What kind of bacon would last that long? Not the limp junk we
    >> have now, that’s for sure.
    >> How was it preserved? How do I get a butcher to make some?
    >>
    >> What other kinds of non-cooled preserved meats could I take?
    >>
    >> Or is it just a pipe dream? Am I stuck with jerky and dried hamburger?
    >>
    >> Tom
    >>
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Hard salami -- including pepperoni, and especially Landjägers.
    > Sharp cheddar cheese.
    > Catch fresh fish for variety.
    >
    > Daughter and I went car-camping a few years ago and mostly ate dried
    > sausage, bread, and dried fruit (and coffee) for 3 weeks. That's not
    > really what we intended to do, we just bought too much really good
    > sausage sticks, didn't eat much, and didn't get tired of it.
    >
    > -Bob

    In the sixties we started using freeze dried foods in place of the old C
    rations. I hear they have improved the taste a lot. There's also surplus
    MRE's available, Meals Ready to EAt. Any decent sporting good store
    should have a supply of various meals for camping or canoeing. Just
    takes water and a source of heat. That's the route I would go if I were
    still camping. With that and fresh fish you can live well for weeks. We
    keep a six-month supply of such foods plus canned goods just for
    hurricanes and other storms.

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