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Thread: Jars & best before

  1. #1
    NT Guest

    Default Jars & best before

    Hi

    From what I've seen of commercial bottling, it turns out some glass
    bottled products aren't heated to boiling at all after filing, such as
    mustard. This is true for sauces in plastic bottles too, which have
    added issues. As these are different to traditional sterile canning,
    what's the food safety situation with such items past ther best before
    date? Its more practical than hypothetical.

    thanks, NT

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Jars & best before

    On 8/7/2012 7:14 AM, NT wrote:
    > Hi
    >
    > From what I've seen of commercial bottling, it turns out some glass
    > bottled products aren't heated to boiling at all after filing, such as
    > mustard. This is true for sauces in plastic bottles too, which have
    > added issues. As these are different to traditional sterile canning,
    > what's the food safety situation with such items past ther best before
    > date? Its more practical than hypothetical.
    >
    > thanks, NT
    >

    Most commercial bottled goods are pasteurized rather than boiling water
    bathed. It's easier to do on a large commercial scale than the BWB
    method. At least that's what I've heard and seen on TV.

    Some things in plastic bottles aren't done either way, mustard for
    example has enough acidity not to be bothered. I've used many condiments
    past their "best by" date without ill effects. I, personally, think it's
    just a ploy to satisfy some politician's urge to make a name for
    protecting the public.

  3. #3
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Jars & best before

    On Aug 7, 2:25*pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    > On 8/7/2012 7:14 AM, NT wrote:> Hi
    >
    > > *From what I've seen of commercial bottling, it turns out some glass
    > > bottled products aren't heated to boiling at all after filing, such as
    > > mustard. This is true for sauces in plastic bottles too, which have
    > > added issues. As these are different to traditional sterile canning,
    > > what's the food safety situation with such items past ther best before
    > > date? Its more practical than hypothetical.

    >
    > > thanks, NT

    >
    > Most commercial bottled goods are pasteurized rather than boiling water
    > bathed. It's easier to do on a large commercial scale than the BWB
    > method. At least that's what I've heard and seen on TV.
    >
    > Some things in plastic bottles aren't done either way, mustard for
    > example has enough acidity not to be bothered. I've used many condiments
    > past their "best by" date without ill effects. I, personally, think it's
    > just a ploy to satisfy some politician's urge to make a name for
    > protecting the public.


    I'm looking for something firmer, this is about use on a catering
    scale. Is there anywhre I might find out?


    NT

  4. #4
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Jars & best before

    On 8/12/2012 2:58 AM, NT wrote:
    > On Aug 7, 2:25 pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    >> On 8/7/2012 7:14 AM, NT wrote:> Hi
    >>
    >>> From what I've seen of commercial bottling, it turns out some glass
    >>> bottled products aren't heated to boiling at all after filing, such as
    >>> mustard. This is true for sauces in plastic bottles too, which have
    >>> added issues. As these are different to traditional sterile canning,
    >>> what's the food safety situation with such items past ther best before
    >>> date? Its more practical than hypothetical.

    >>
    >>> thanks, NT

    >>
    >> Most commercial bottled goods are pasteurized rather than boiling water
    >> bathed. It's easier to do on a large commercial scale than the BWB
    >> method. At least that's what I've heard and seen on TV.
    >>
    >> Some things in plastic bottles aren't done either way, mustard for
    >> example has enough acidity not to be bothered. I've used many condiments
    >> past their "best by" date without ill effects. I, personally, think it's
    >> just a ploy to satisfy some politician's urge to make a name for
    >> protecting the public.

    >
    > I'm looking for something firmer, this is about use on a catering
    > scale. Is there anywhre I might find out?
    >
    >
    > NT
    >

    Your local state agriculture extension service may be able to help you.
    Other than that you would probably need to hire a food consultant. You
    might do a search on USDA food safety rules and find something.

  5. #5
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Jars & best before

    On Aug 12, 1:25*pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    > On 8/12/2012 2:58 AM, NT wrote:
    >
    > > On Aug 7, 2:25 pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    > >> On 8/7/2012 7:14 AM, NT wrote:> Hi

    >
    > >>> * From what I've seen of commercial bottling, it turns out some glass
    > >>> bottled products aren't heated to boiling at all after filing, such as
    > >>> mustard. This is true for sauces in plastic bottles too, which have
    > >>> added issues. As these are different to traditional sterile canning,
    > >>> what's the food safety situation with such items past ther best before
    > >>> date? Its more practical than hypothetical.

    >
    > >>> thanks, NT

    >
    > >> Most commercial bottled goods are pasteurized rather than boiling water
    > >> bathed. It's easier to do on a large commercial scale than the BWB
    > >> method. At least that's what I've heard and seen on TV.

    >
    > >> Some things in plastic bottles aren't done either way, mustard for
    > >> example has enough acidity not to be bothered. I've used many condiments
    > >> past their "best by" date without ill effects. I, personally, think it's
    > >> just a ploy to satisfy some politician's urge to make a name for
    > >> protecting the public.

    >
    > > I'm looking for something firmer, this is about use on a catering
    > > scale. Is there anywhre I might find out?

    >
    > > NT

    >
    > Your local state agriculture extension service may be able to help you.
    > Other than that you would probably need to hire a food consultant. You
    > might do a search on USDA food safety rules and find something.


    Thanks George. I'm not in the US btw.

    NT

  6. #6
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Jars & best before

    On 8/12/2012 11:57 AM, NT wrote:
    > On Aug 12, 1:25 pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    >> On 8/12/2012 2:58 AM, NT wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Aug 7, 2:25 pm, George Shirley <gmshir...@suddenlink.net> wrote:
    >>>> On 8/7/2012 7:14 AM, NT wrote:> Hi

    >>
    >>>>> From what I've seen of commercial bottling, it turns out some glass
    >>>>> bottled products aren't heated to boiling at all after filing, such as
    >>>>> mustard. This is true for sauces in plastic bottles too, which have
    >>>>> added issues. As these are different to traditional sterile canning,
    >>>>> what's the food safety situation with such items past ther best before
    >>>>> date? Its more practical than hypothetical.

    >>
    >>>>> thanks, NT

    >>
    >>>> Most commercial bottled goods are pasteurized rather than boiling water
    >>>> bathed. It's easier to do on a large commercial scale than the BWB
    >>>> method. At least that's what I've heard and seen on TV.

    >>
    >>>> Some things in plastic bottles aren't done either way, mustard for
    >>>> example has enough acidity not to be bothered. I've used many condiments
    >>>> past their "best by" date without ill effects. I, personally, think it's
    >>>> just a ploy to satisfy some politician's urge to make a name for
    >>>> protecting the public.

    >>
    >>> I'm looking for something firmer, this is about use on a catering
    >>> scale. Is there anywhre I might find out?

    >>
    >>> NT

    >>
    >> Your local state agriculture extension service may be able to help you.
    >> Other than that you would probably need to hire a food consultant. You
    >> might do a search on USDA food safety rules and find something.

    >
    > Thanks George. I'm not in the US btw.
    >
    > NT
    >

    You can always send an email to the folks in food safety at the U of
    GA site, maybe they can help you. Most countries have a body that vets
    out food safety, look around.

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