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Thread: Introducing myself

  1. #1
    Anj Guest

    Default Introducing myself

    Hi, all,

    I'm not quite a newbie to canning, nor am I an expert. I can mainly
    juices and jams/jellies and freeze my vegies. Have several pots I
    used for WB canning, but no pressure canner (ah, may be why I freeze
    instead? *grin*) I came across an interesting way to freeze certain
    vegies the other day and thought I'd get an opinion on it.

    Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. I did
    some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. That was news to me
    because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.

    Since we have such a large crop of summer squash, I decided to give
    this a try. With so many squash I figured we didn't have a lot to
    lose. The squash would just go bad anyway. Haven't tried any of the
    frozen stuff yet as we are still harvesting.

    Does anyone have an opinion on this method? Has anyone tried this
    method? If tried, what were the results? (And I apologize in advance
    if this topic has been covered before. I did a search of the group
    but didn't find any relevant results.)

    TIA,
    Anj


  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    Anj wrote:
    > Hi, all,
    >
    > I'm not quite a newbie to canning, nor am I an expert. I can mainly
    > juices and jams/jellies and freeze my vegies. Have several pots I
    > used for WB canning, but no pressure canner (ah, may be why I freeze
    > instead? *grin*) I came across an interesting way to freeze certain
    > vegies the other day and thought I'd get an opinion on it.
    >
    > Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    > then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    > kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. I did
    > some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    > 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. That was news to me
    > because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.
    >
    > Since we have such a large crop of summer squash, I decided to give
    > this a try. With so many squash I figured we didn't have a lot to
    > lose. The squash would just go bad anyway. Haven't tried any of the
    > frozen stuff yet as we are still harvesting.
    >
    > Does anyone have an opinion on this method? Has anyone tried this
    > method? If tried, what were the results? (And I apologize in advance
    > if this topic has been covered before. I did a search of the group
    > but didn't find any relevant results.)
    >
    > TIA,
    > Anj
    >

    Had not heard of this method before Anj, do you have a cite for the
    method so we can look it up too? Sounds interesting.

    I do freeze a number of things by slicing or chopping, put on a bun pan,
    stick it in the freezer for an hour, then move the product to a vacuum
    seal bag, seal, mark as to product, then toss in the freezer. Lasts two
    to three years that way if we don't use it all up first. Mostly do sweet
    chiles and okra this way with no degradation of the vegetables. All the
    other stuff I freeze by blanching according to the time table, running
    it through an ice water bath, put it in a colander, then run it through
    the salad spinner, after that it gets bagged and vac sealed.

  3. #3
    Anj Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    On Jul 13, 3:44*pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:

    > > I'm not quite a newbie to canning, nor am I an expert.

    *snip*
    and freeze my vegies. **I came across an interesting way to freeze
    certain
    > > vegies the other day and thought I'd get an opinion on it.

    >
    > > Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    > > then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    > > kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. *I did
    > > some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    > > 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. *That was news to me
    > > because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.

    >

    *snip*
    >
    > > Does anyone have an opinion on this method? Has anyone tried this
    > > method? *If tried, what were the results? *(And I apologize in advance
    > > if this topic has been covered before. *I did a search of the group
    > > but didn't find any relevant results.)


    > Had not heard of this method before Anj, do you have a cite for the
    > method so we can look it up too? Sounds interesting.
    >
    > I do freeze a number of things by slicing or chopping, put on a bun pan,
    > stick it in the freezer for an hour, then move the product to a vacuum
    > seal bag, seal, mark as to product, then toss in the freezer. Lasts two
    > to three years that way if we don't use it all up first. Mostly do sweet
    > chiles and okra this way with no degradation of the vegetables. All the
    > other stuff I freeze by blanching according to the time table, running
    > it through an ice water bath, put it in a colander, then run it through
    > the salad spinner, after that it gets bagged and vac sealed.


    Thanks for the response, George! I really appreciate it.

    Sorry! I meant to include the link the last time.
    http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf25719721.tip.html

    And I'd also like to than you for taking another look.

    Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    gate. So decided to walk down and take a look. I know better than
    that in this heat! Now I'm hot, dizzy and sweaty and trying to cool
    off.

    Hugs,
    Anj



  4. #4
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    Anj wrote:
    > On Jul 13, 3:44 pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >
    >>> I'm not quite a newbie to canning, nor am I an expert.

    > *snip*
    > and freeze my vegies. I came across an interesting way to freeze
    > certain
    >>> vegies the other day and thought I'd get an opinion on it.
    >>> Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    >>> then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    >>> kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. I did
    >>> some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    >>> 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. That was news to me
    >>> because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.

    > *snip*
    >>> Does anyone have an opinion on this method? Has anyone tried this
    >>> method? If tried, what were the results? (And I apologize in advance
    >>> if this topic has been covered before. I did a search of the group
    >>> but didn't find any relevant results.)

    >
    >> Had not heard of this method before Anj, do you have a cite for the
    >> method so we can look it up too? Sounds interesting.
    >>
    >> I do freeze a number of things by slicing or chopping, put on a bun pan,
    >> stick it in the freezer for an hour, then move the product to a vacuum
    >> seal bag, seal, mark as to product, then toss in the freezer. Lasts two
    >> to three years that way if we don't use it all up first. Mostly do sweet
    >> chiles and okra this way with no degradation of the vegetables. All the
    >> other stuff I freeze by blanching according to the time table, running
    >> it through an ice water bath, put it in a colander, then run it through
    >> the salad spinner, after that it gets bagged and vac sealed.

    >
    > Thanks for the response, George! I really appreciate it.
    >
    > Sorry! I meant to include the link the last time.
    > http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf25719721.tip.html


    Thank you, I'll look into it. Doesn't quite meet USDA standards but has
    possibilities.
    >
    > And I'd also like to than you for taking another look.


    No problemo.
    >
    > Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    > lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    > gate. So decided to walk down and take a look. I know better than
    > that in this heat! Now I'm hot, dizzy and sweaty and trying to cool
    > off.
    >
    > Hugs,
    > Anj
    >
    >

    DW was out mowing this morning, again. Got home from running errands at
    1130 and she was just coming in. Heat index temperature was slightly
    over 120F at that time. Got her into a tepid shower, changed to cold,
    then dried off and rested for several hours. No fool like an old fool.

  5. #5
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hOO6m.23125$[email protected] ..
    > Anj wrote:
    >> On Jul 13, 3:44 pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>> I'm not quite a newbie to canning, nor am I an expert.

    >> *snip*
    >> and freeze my vegies. I came across an interesting way to freeze
    >> certain
    >>>> vegies the other day and thought I'd get an opinion on it.
    >>>> Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    >>>> then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    >>>> kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. I did
    >>>> some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    >>>> 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. That was news to me
    >>>> because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.

    >> *snip*
    >>>> Does anyone have an opinion on this method? Has anyone tried this
    >>>> method? If tried, what were the results? (And I apologize in advance
    >>>> if this topic has been covered before. I did a search of the group
    >>>> but didn't find any relevant results.)

    >>
    >>> Had not heard of this method before Anj, do you have a cite for the
    >>> method so we can look it up too? Sounds interesting.
    >>>
    >>> I do freeze a number of things by slicing or chopping, put on a bun pan,
    >>> stick it in the freezer for an hour, then move the product to a vacuum
    >>> seal bag, seal, mark as to product, then toss in the freezer. Lasts two
    >>> to three years that way if we don't use it all up first. Mostly do sweet
    >>> chiles and okra this way with no degradation of the vegetables. All the
    >>> other stuff I freeze by blanching according to the time table, running
    >>> it through an ice water bath, put it in a colander, then run it through
    >>> the salad spinner, after that it gets bagged and vac sealed.

    >>
    >> Thanks for the response, George! I really appreciate it.
    >>
    >> Sorry! I meant to include the link the last time.
    >> http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf25719721.tip.html

    >
    > Thank you, I'll look into it. Doesn't quite meet USDA standards but has
    > possibilities.
    >>
    >> And I'd also like to than you for taking another look.

    >
    > No problemo.
    >>
    >> Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    >> lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    >> gate. So decided to walk down and take a look. I know better than
    >> that in this heat! Now I'm hot, dizzy and sweaty and trying to cool
    >> off.
    >>
    >> Hugs,
    >> Anj
    >>
    >>

    > DW was out mowing this morning, again. Got home from running errands at
    > 1130 and she was just coming in. Heat index temperature was slightly over
    > 120F at that time. Got her into a tepid shower, changed to cold, then
    > dried off and rested for several hours. No fool like an old fool.


    It gets to 90 here and we don't mow the lawn. I remember those days from
    when my husband was stationed at Ft. Hood in Central Texas during the mid
    '80s. There's a reason we moved back home.




  6. #6
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    Marilyn wrote:
    > "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:hOO6m.23125$[email protected] ..
    >> Anj wrote:
    >>> On Jul 13, 3:44 pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>> I'm not quite a newbie to canning, nor am I an expert.
    >>> *snip*
    >>> and freeze my vegies. I came across an interesting way to freeze
    >>> certain
    >>>>> vegies the other day and thought I'd get an opinion on it.
    >>>>> Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    >>>>> then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    >>>>> kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. I did
    >>>>> some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    >>>>> 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. That was news to me
    >>>>> because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.
    >>> *snip*
    >>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on this method? Has anyone tried this
    >>>>> method? If tried, what were the results? (And I apologize in advance
    >>>>> if this topic has been covered before. I did a search of the group
    >>>>> but didn't find any relevant results.)
    >>>> Had not heard of this method before Anj, do you have a cite for the
    >>>> method so we can look it up too? Sounds interesting.
    >>>>
    >>>> I do freeze a number of things by slicing or chopping, put on a bun pan,
    >>>> stick it in the freezer for an hour, then move the product to a vacuum
    >>>> seal bag, seal, mark as to product, then toss in the freezer. Lasts two
    >>>> to three years that way if we don't use it all up first. Mostly do sweet
    >>>> chiles and okra this way with no degradation of the vegetables. All the
    >>>> other stuff I freeze by blanching according to the time table, running
    >>>> it through an ice water bath, put it in a colander, then run it through
    >>>> the salad spinner, after that it gets bagged and vac sealed.
    >>> Thanks for the response, George! I really appreciate it.
    >>>
    >>> Sorry! I meant to include the link the last time.
    >>> http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf25719721.tip.html

    >> Thank you, I'll look into it. Doesn't quite meet USDA standards but has
    >> possibilities.
    >>> And I'd also like to than you for taking another look.

    >> No problemo.
    >>> Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    >>> lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    >>> gate. So decided to walk down and take a look. I know better than
    >>> that in this heat! Now I'm hot, dizzy and sweaty and trying to cool
    >>> off.
    >>>
    >>> Hugs,
    >>> Anj
    >>>
    >>>

    >> DW was out mowing this morning, again. Got home from running errands at
    >> 1130 and she was just coming in. Heat index temperature was slightly over
    >> 120F at that time. Got her into a tepid shower, changed to cold, then
    >> dried off and rested for several hours. No fool like an old fool.

    >
    > It gets to 90 here and we don't mow the lawn. I remember those days from
    > when my husband was stationed at Ft. Hood in Central Texas during the mid
    > '80s. There's a reason we moved back home.
    >
    >
    >

    Hood is heaven in the summer compared to the SW Louisiana coast. Pulled
    a couple of summer camps at Hood back in the seventies before I saw the
    light and pulled the plug.

  7. #7
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:X6Q6m.22574$[email protected]. .
    > Marilyn wrote:
    >> "George Shirley" <gshirl@bellsout[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:hOO6m.23125$[email protected] ..
    >>> Anj wrote:
    >>>> On Jul 13, 3:44 pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>>> I'm not quite a newbie to canning, nor am I an expert.
    >>>> *snip*
    >>>> and freeze my vegies. I came across an interesting way to freeze
    >>>> certain
    >>>>>> vegies the other day and thought I'd get an opinion on it.
    >>>>>> Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    >>>>>> then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    >>>>>> kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. I
    >>>>>> did
    >>>>>> some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    >>>>>> 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. That was news to me
    >>>>>> because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.
    >>>> *snip*
    >>>>>> Does anyone have an opinion on this method? Has anyone tried this
    >>>>>> method? If tried, what were the results? (And I apologize in
    >>>>>> advance
    >>>>>> if this topic has been covered before. I did a search of the group
    >>>>>> but didn't find any relevant results.)
    >>>>> Had not heard of this method before Anj, do you have a cite for the
    >>>>> method so we can look it up too? Sounds interesting.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I do freeze a number of things by slicing or chopping, put on a bun
    >>>>> pan,
    >>>>> stick it in the freezer for an hour, then move the product to a vacuum
    >>>>> seal bag, seal, mark as to product, then toss in the freezer. Lasts
    >>>>> two
    >>>>> to three years that way if we don't use it all up first. Mostly do
    >>>>> sweet
    >>>>> chiles and okra this way with no degradation of the vegetables. All
    >>>>> the
    >>>>> other stuff I freeze by blanching according to the time table, running
    >>>>> it through an ice water bath, put it in a colander, then run it
    >>>>> through
    >>>>> the salad spinner, after that it gets bagged and vac sealed.
    >>>> Thanks for the response, George! I really appreciate it.
    >>>>
    >>>> Sorry! I meant to include the link the last time.
    >>>> http://www.thriftyfun.com/tf25719721.tip.html
    >>> Thank you, I'll look into it. Doesn't quite meet USDA standards but has
    >>> possibilities.
    >>>> And I'd also like to than you for taking another look.
    >>> No problemo.
    >>>> Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    >>>> lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    >>>> gate. So decided to walk down and take a look. I know better than
    >>>> that in this heat! Now I'm hot, dizzy and sweaty and trying to cool
    >>>> off.
    >>>>
    >>>> Hugs,
    >>>> Anj
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>> DW was out mowing this morning, again. Got home from running errands at
    >>> 1130 and she was just coming in. Heat index temperature was slightly
    >>> over 120F at that time. Got her into a tepid shower, changed to cold,
    >>> then dried off and rested for several hours. No fool like an old fool.

    >>
    >> It gets to 90 here and we don't mow the lawn. I remember those days from
    >> when my husband was stationed at Ft. Hood in Central Texas during the mid
    >> '80s. There's a reason we moved back home.
    >>
    >>
    >>

    > Hood is heaven in the summer compared to the SW Louisiana coast. Pulled a
    > couple of summer camps at Hood back in the seventies before I saw the
    > light and pulled the plug.


    Oh, I dunno. I remember the days when you walked out the door and it was
    like stepping into a sauna. Thank goodness we lived in military housing
    that had AC.




  8. #8
    S Turner Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself


    >Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    >lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    >gate.


    Front gate? Gates vary but the type with long lanes?
    One does not go past a closed gate without an invite. At best, rude.

    Here, Fed Ex needed to be told where to leave packages, and to leave them
    and UPS I guess has known the area and just leaves 'em like the USPS people
    do.
    STurner
    Ohio, USA

  9. #9
    NorthWet Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    On Jul 13, 1:33*pm, Anj <anjal...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    > then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    > kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. *I did
    > some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    > 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. *That was news to me
    > because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.
    >


    I'd hafta to voice some doubts on this method. I was inundated with
    waaay too many peas earlier this year. Once I realized I wouldn't be
    able to process them all before they went bad I washed several gallons
    and tossed them directly into the freezer. I thought it would only be
    for about a week ... that week has stretched into a month and I have
    20 more gallons of cherries to dehydrate before I can get back to the
    peas. Anyway, tried some for dinner the other night. Yuck! They
    started out tasting wonderful and sweet and ended with a distinct
    vinegar taste. Serving with onions and a vinaigrette made it okay
    but ... I doubt you'll catch me trying to skip a step again ...
    Granted I didn't use this method but they didn't last a month for me
    either ....

    Camille

  10. #10
    Anj Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    On Jul 14, 12:04*am, NorthWet <north...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 13, 1:33*pm, Anj <anjal...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Basically, this method is to slice, quarter, etc., your vegetable and
    > > then put them in a triple thickness of brown paper sack (the freezer
    > > kind or double lunch sacks) and toss the sack into the freezer. *I did
    > > some reading on this and found that unblanched vegies will last up to
    > > 6 months, but blanched will last up to a year. *That was news to me
    > > because I'd ALWAYS blanched in the past.

    >
    > I'd hafta to voice some doubts on this method. I was inundated with
    > waaay too many peas earlier this year. Once I realized I wouldn't be
    > able to process them all before they went bad I washed several gallons
    > and tossed them directly into the freezer. I thought it would only be
    > for about a week ... that week has stretched into a month and I have
    > 20 more gallons of cherries to dehydrate before I can get back to the
    > peas. Anyway, tried some for dinner the other night. Yuck! They
    > started out tasting wonderful and sweet and ended with a distinct
    > vinegar taste. Serving with onions and a vinaigrette made it okay
    > but ... I doubt you'll catch me trying to skip a step again ...
    > Granted I didn't use this method but they didn't last a month for me
    > either ....
    >
    > Camille


    Your experience is what I'm concerned about. Without blanching the
    enzymes keep ripening the vegies, even when they're frozen. BUT...
    this site and article mentioned vegies by name, Hey, with all the
    extra squash, if it doesn't work, well, the biggest loss will be our
    time.

    Thanks for the response, Camille!
    Hugs,
    Anj

  11. #11
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    S Turner wrote:
    >> Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    >> lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    >> gate.

    >
    > Front gate? Gates vary but the type with long lanes?
    > One does not go past a closed gate without an invite. At best, rude.
    >
    > Here, Fed Ex needed to be told where to leave packages, and to leave them
    > and UPS I guess has known the area and just leaves 'em like the USPS people
    > do.
    > STurner
    > Ohio, USA

    We have friends with a long lane to their house that is gated at the
    road. They put in a box made of steel for UPS and Fedex to deposit
    packages. Then they wired it to light up a bulb at their shop when the
    box was opened. Works for them.

  12. #12
    David Arfsten Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    On Jul 14, 6:49*am, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    > S Turner wrote:
    > >> Whew! *I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    > >> lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    > >> gate. *

    >
    > > Front gate? Gates vary but the type with long lanes?
    > > One does not go past a closed gate without an invite. At best, rude.

    >
    > > Here, Fed Ex needed to be told where to leave packages, and to leave them
    > > and UPS I guess has known the area and just leaves 'em like the USPS people
    > > do.
    > > STurner
    > > Ohio, USA

    >
    > We have friends with a long lane to their house that is gated at the
    > road. They put in a box made of steel for UPS and Fedex to deposit
    > packages. Then they wired it to light up a bulb at their shop when the
    > box was opened. Works for them.


    A pretty ingenious solution too! We don't have the wiring to do
    that... but it's something to think about.

  13. #13
    David Arfsten Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    On Jul 14, 1:38*pm, David Arfsten <darfs...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jul 14, 6:49*am, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > S Turner wrote:
    > > >> Whew! *I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    > > >> lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    > > >> gate. *

    >
    > > > Front gate? Gates vary but the type with long lanes?
    > > > One does not go past a closed gate without an invite. At best, rude.

    >
    > > > Here, Fed Ex needed to be told where to leave packages, and to leave them
    > > > and UPS I guess has known the area and just leaves 'em like the USPS people
    > > > do.
    > > > STurner
    > > > Ohio, USA

    >
    > > We have friends with a long lane to their house that is gated at the
    > > road. They put in a box made of steel for UPS and Fedex to deposit
    > > packages. Then they wired it to light up a bulb at their shop when the
    > > box was opened. Works for them.

    >
    > A pretty ingenious solution too! *We don't have the wiring to do
    > that... but it's something to think about.


    Oops! Sorry, y'all! My husband logged in to his account and I didn't
    notice, hence the posts in his name. I will fix it before I come to
    the group next time.
    Hugs,
    Anj

  14. #14
    Bob Muncie Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    David Arfsten wrote:
    > On Jul 14, 1:38 pm, David Arfsten <darfs...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >> On Jul 14, 6:49 am, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> S Turner wrote:
    >>>>> Whew! I am expecting a package and being at the end of a longgggg
    >>>>> lane the UPS and Fed-X people usually just leave it at our front
    >>>>> gate.
    >>>> Front gate? Gates vary but the type with long lanes?
    >>>> One does not go past a closed gate without an invite. At best, rude.
    >>>> Here, Fed Ex needed to be told where to leave packages, and to leave them
    >>>> and UPS I guess has known the area and just leaves 'em like the USPS people
    >>>> do.
    >>>> STurner
    >>>> Ohio, USA
    >>> We have friends with a long lane to their house that is gated at the
    >>> road. They put in a box made of steel for UPS and Fedex to deposit
    >>> packages. Then they wired it to light up a bulb at their shop when the
    >>> box was opened. Works for them.

    >> A pretty ingenious solution too! We don't have the wiring to do
    >> that... but it's something to think about.

    >
    > Oops! Sorry, y'all! My husband logged in to his account and I didn't
    > notice, hence the posts in his name. I will fix it before I come to
    > the group next time.
    > Hugs,
    > Anj



    That's okay Anj... David is welcome also :-)

    Bob

  15. #15
    Brian Mailman Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    NorthWet wrote:
    >
    > I'd hafta to voice some doubts on this method. I was inundated with
    > waaay too many peas earlier this year.... I washed several gallons
    > and tossed them directly into the freezer.... Anyway, tried some for dinner the other night. Yuck! They
    > started out tasting wonderful and sweet and ended with a distinct
    > vinegar taste. Serving with onions and a vinaigrette made it okay
    > but ... I doubt you'll catch me trying to skip a step again ...
    > Granted


    I've been following this, just for my own interest, not because I grow
    enough to freeze anything. But this fits right into what I know about
    blanching. The enzymes "do something" unless they're deactivated by
    blanching.

    B/

  16. #16
    Anj Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself


    > > Oops! *Sorry, y'all! *My husband logged in to his account and I didn't
    > > notice, hence the posts in his name. *I will fix it before I come to
    > > the group next time.
    > > Hugs,
    > > Anj

    >
    > That's okay Anj... David is welcome also :-)
    >
    > Bob


    Thank you for the graciousness!
    Hugs,
    Anj

  17. #17
    Anj Guest

    Default Re: Introducing myself

    > I've been following this, just for my own interest, not because I grow
    > enough to freeze anything. *But this fits right into what I know about
    > blanching. *The enzymes "do something" unless they're deactivated by
    > blanching.
    >
    > B/


    Hi, Brian,

    Maybe that's why there are only certain vegies recommended for this?
    The enzymes continue the ripening process. I know there are some
    vegies that I've harvested, cleaned and stuck in the freezer (bell
    peppers for example) and they do well--in certain aspects. There are
    other vegies I'd never dream of treating that way. AND... I wouldn't
    do it with bell peppers unless I was only using them for seasoning as
    they go really soft if they aren't blanched.

    In this case, maybe it's the vegies that don't continue ripening at a
    rapid rate that can be frozen without blanching? This thought just
    crossed my mind and I'm throwing it out for comment. I haven't deeply
    thought about it yet. *grin*

    Hugs,
    Anj

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