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Thread: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.

  1. #1
    Wyandotte is offline Assistant Cook
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    Default How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.

    Hi. I was given some home-grown small Mongolian cherries from which I'd like to make jam. How do I remove the pits (you can't use one of those hand pitting things, which are suitable only for large cherries)? Would I pretend I'm making jelly and then just squeeze the bag like hell to get as much fiber out as I could?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Wyandotte <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi. I was given some home-grown small Mongolian cherries from which I'd
    > like to make jam. How do I remove the pits (you can't use one of those
    > hand pitting things, which are suitable only for large cherries)? Would
    > I pretend I'm making jelly and then just squeeze the bag like hell to
    > get as much fiber out as I could?
    >
    > Thanks.


    I don't think that's what you want to do. Personally, I'd pick a
    different fruit (I'm kind of lazy) but if someone held a gun to my head
    and said I had to do it, I'd get comfortable with a cool beverage near
    by, some nice tunes, and a sharp paring knife. I'd slit the cherry and
    try to get the pit out. Try a paper clip to get under it.

    After about 5 minutes, I'd say to hell with it and cook those suckers in
    the microwave and drain them for the juice for jelly or barbecue sauce.
    I might go through the mush with my hands to squirt out the pit. Or I
    might not. It's what I do with my plums then I make plum butter. And
    I use the Mehu-Liisa for juicing my plums, not the microwave.

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of
    St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew;
    sometimes in a pickle."
    Where are my pearls, Honey?

  3. #3
    Kathi Jones Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Wyandotte <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Hi. I was given some home-grown small Mongolian cherries from which I'd
    >> like to make jam. How do I remove the pits (you can't use one of those
    >> hand pitting things, which are suitable only for large cherries)? Would
    >> I pretend I'm making jelly and then just squeeze the bag like hell to
    >> get as much fiber out as I could?
    >>
    >> Thanks.

    >
    > I don't think that's what you want to do. Personally, I'd pick a
    > different fruit (I'm kind of lazy) but if someone held a gun to my head
    > and said I had to do it, I'd get comfortable with a cool beverage near
    > by, some nice tunes, and a sharp paring knife. I'd slit the cherry and
    > try to get the pit out. Try a paper clip to get under it.
    >
    > After about 5 minutes, I'd say to hell with it and cook those suckers in
    > the microwave and drain them for the juice for jelly or barbecue sauce.
    > I might go through the mush with my hands to squirt out the pit. Or I
    > might not. It's what I do with my plums < then I make plum butter. And
    > I use the Mehu-Liisa for juicing my plums, not the microwave.
    >
    > --
    > Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of
    > St. Pectina of Jella
    > "Always in a jam, never in a stew;
    > sometimes in a pickle."
    > Where are my pearls, Honey?


    I'm with Barb. I'm too lazy to pit cherries. I buy those red/black?
    cherries when they are on sale at the grocery store for eating fresh out of
    hand. But sometimes they start to turn before we can finish them, so I mash
    the heck out of them, nuke them and juice them. Sometimes I even press the
    pulp through a strainer - that way the results are a think pulpy jelly
    rather than a clear one.

    I'm not a ribbon slut like Barb, so I'm not looking to win any prizes.
    Making something good for toast or PBnJ sangwiches is pretty much my goal.

    Kathi




  4. #4
    Wyandotte is offline Assistant Cook
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    Default

    Thanks for your opinions. I don't mind if my jelly is jam-like or my jam is jelly-like, in any case. I don't nuke beautiful, local, family-grown fruit. I may just put the cherries into a basin and stamp on them

  5. #5
    Beti Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.

    I wondering if you could use cheesecloth, like only one or two layers,
    instead of the jelly bag. Maybe you'd get more pulp that way. Or if
    you have a really coarse strainer. Or maybe one of those Chinese wire
    strainer ladle things (technical term :-) Mine is pretty coarse but
    maybe if you just pressed carefully to keep the pits out. Good luck!

  6. #6
    Clear Satin Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.


    >Hi. I was given some home-grown small Mongolian cherries from which I'd
    >like to make jam. How do I remove the pits (you can't use one of those
    >hand pitting things, which are suitable only for large cherries)? Would
    >I pretend I'm making jelly and then just squeeze the bag like hell to
    >get as much fiber out as I could?



    What is that thing called. Right. Foley Food Mill.
    http://www.lehmans.com/store/Kitchen..._H620971?Args=
    I'd put 'em in that to, like mutilate them so's the juice could ooze out, but I have
    one and if you buy one chances are the cherries will not be useful by the time it
    gets to you.
    So, One quart boiling water, one cup cherries, some kind of fryer basket type thing.
    Blanch 'um for a minute a or so, dump them in a bowl or something to cool, and ;p
    stomp them like wine grapes.
    I don't recall for cherries, but for some stone fruits? You really don't want the pit to
    cook into the flesh, tastes bad, bad for you.
    Shawn

  7. #7
    ST Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.

    Clear Satin.
    Dam~ I've gotta set up a second start in folder so I'll stop forgeting who I am.
    SDT

    >>Hi. I was given some home-grown small Mongolian cherries from which I'd
    >>like to make jam. How do I remove the pits (you can't use one of those
    >>hand pitting things, which are suitable only for large cherries)? Would
    >>I pretend I'm making jelly and then just squeeze the bag like hell to
    >>get as much fiber out as I could?

    >
    >
    >What is that thing called. Right. Foley Food Mill.
    >http://www.lehmans.com/store/Kitchen..._H620971?Args=
    >I'd put 'em in that to, like mutilate them so's the juice could ooze out, but I have
    >one and if you buy one chances are the cherries will not be useful by the time it
    >gets to you.
    >So, One quart boiling water, one cup cherries, some kind of fryer basket type thing.
    >Blanch 'um for a minute a or so, dump them in a bowl or something to cool, and ;p
    >stomp them like wine grapes.
    >I don't recall for cherries, but for some stone fruits? You really don't want the pit to
    >cook into the flesh, tastes bad, bad for you.
    >Shawn


  8. #8
    Wyandotte is offline Assistant Cook
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    Default

    Thanks, Beti and all. Okay, what I went & did was blanch the tiny cherries, place them into a single layer of cheesecloth, cool & squeeze. I got some nice sludgy juice which I made into a jam, or tried to, but didn't use sufficient pectin and it's more of a sauce, but it doesn't matter.

    Re Foley Food Mill, thanks for suggestion. I have an Italian version called the Macina-Legumi. These kinds of food mills don't work (well) for something with a good-sized pit. Tomatoes, yes.

    Thanks to all for responding to my post.

    I still want a Mehu Liisa. I'm accepting donations

    Just joking, friends!

  9. #9
    ST Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.


    >Thanks, Beti and all. Okay, what I went & did was blanch the tiny
    >cherries, place them into a single layer of cheesecloth, cool & squeeze.
    >I got some nice sludgy juice which I made into a jam, or tried to, but
    >didn't use sufficient pectin and it's more of a sauce, but it doesn't
    >matter.


    -grin-
    This is called 'syrup' which goes great on pancakes, waffles and annoying
    guys. (My new yahoo profile says I'm a fem, I don't know why, but here
    goes: This. Flashback to a show. Guy is a [censored]. Girl asks bartender
    for the stickiest drink Splash.)

    But seriously, even money on if these will jell up in the next week.
    If they don't in two weeks remember that you never meant to make jelly
    and were doing syrup, or add that pectin and reprocess.
    >Re Foley Food Mill, thanks for suggestion. I have an Italian version
    >called the Macina-Legumi. These kinds of food mills don't work (well)
    >for something with a good-sized pit. Tomatoes, yes.


    Thank you for that info.
    Mine is great for separating apple sauce from apple seeds/skins, and
    does great with cranberries.
    I've never tried it w/ a stone fruit, and? Thank you, won't.

    >I still want a Mehu Liisa. I'm accepting donations



  10. #10
    Wallace Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.


    "Wyandotte" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Hi. I was given some home-grown small Mongolian cherries from which I'd
    > like to make jam. How do I remove the pits (you can't use one of those
    > hand pitting things, which are suitable only for large cherries)? Would
    > I pretend I'm making jelly and then just squeeze the bag like hell to
    > get as much fiber out as I could?
    >
    > Thanks.



    I read all the answers and didn't see what occurred to me: cook them down,
    let them cool, then use your hands to squeeze out the good stuff and keep
    the pits in your hand. Messy, and surely you will loose some of the good
    stuff still in your hand, but that's what I would do.



  11. #11
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.

    In article <[email protected]>,
    ST <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >Thanks, Beti and all. Okay, what I went & did was blanch the tiny


    > >Re Foley Food Mill, thanks for suggestion. I have an Italian version
    > >called the Macina-Legumi. These kinds of food mills don't work (well)
    > >for something with a good-sized pit. Tomatoes, yes.

    >
    > Thank you for that info.
    > Mine is great for separating apple sauce from apple seeds/skins, and
    > does great with cranberries.
    > I've never tried it w/ a stone fruit, and? Thank you, won't.


    I don't recommend it. After going through my plum mush by hand to
    remove the stones, I mill it for plum butter. I always find a few pits
    that I missed and have to back up and fish them out of the mill. Not
    the end of the world, just a minor nuisance.
    >
    > >I still want a Mehu Liisa. I'm accepting donations


    Get a job! :-) "-)

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of
    St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew;
    sometimes in a pickle."
    Where are my pearls, Honey?

  12. #12
    Kitty Guest

    Default Re: How to deal with tiny cherries? For JAM.

    On Aug 15, 2:02*pm, Wyandotte <Wyandotte.4fr...@no-
    mx.forums.yourdomain.com.au> wrote:
    > Hi. *I was given some home-grown small Mongolian cherries from which I'd
    > like to make jam. How do I remove the pits (you can't use one of those
    > hand pitting things, which are suitable only for large cherries)? *Would
    > I pretend I'm making jelly and then just squeeze the bag like hell to
    > get as much fiber out as I could? *
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
    > --
    > Wyandotte


    Try a ricer. cook them to within an inch of their lives and then put
    them in the ricer. there's a spring in there which will allow the
    pusher to float (more or less) over the pits. I won't say you'll get
    all the pulp but you'll get a lot or most of it. I think... it's been
    a century since I did it last but seems in the depths of my memory it
    worked for me.

  13. #13
    Wyandotte is offline Assistant Cook
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    Default

    Gee, my ricer doesn't have much "give". If I try to put something in there with big pits, or any kind of pits, the disk and handle and everything come out and then there's this almighty mess all over. Thanks for your suggestion anyway.

    There's a reason somebody invented jellybags & cheesecloth, doncha all think?

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