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Thread: Hot Drying

  1. #1
    NT Guest

    Default Hot Drying

    I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.

    And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?


    NT

  2. #2
    Shawn Martin Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On 2/12/2012 10:16 AM, NT wrote:
    > I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    > I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    > there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    > sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.
    >
    > And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?
    >
    >
    > NT


    Depends on the relative humidity of the surrounding air. Cooler drying
    will help keep that "fresh" taste, while hotter air tends to cook the
    items a little, in my opinion muddies the taste.

    Here in Dallas, TX. Trying to dry berries at room temps, will almost
    always result in some kind of fermentation. (mold, yeast, etc>) The
    usual summertime temps and humidity are about 100F and 70% humidity.
    Drying foods here must be at or near 125F (or 52C).

    Out in El Paso, TX, where the temps are about the same, but the humidity
    seldom rises above 15% room temp drying is not only possible, but preferred.

    Drying at 100C is cooking, as that would be the boiling point of water.

  3. #3
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Feb 13, 2:33*pm, Shawn Martin <panl...@starband.net> wrote:
    > On 2/12/2012 10:16 AM, NT wrote:
    >
    > > I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    > > I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    > > there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    > > sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.

    >
    > > And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?

    >
    > > NT

    >
    > Depends on the relative humidity of the surrounding air. *Cooler drying
    > will help keep that "fresh" taste, while hotter air tends to cook the
    > items a little, in my opinion muddies the taste.
    >
    > Here in Dallas, TX. *Trying to dry berries at room temps, will almost
    > always result in some kind of fermentation. *(mold, yeast, etc>) *The
    > usual summertime temps and humidity are about 100F and 70% humidity.
    > Drying foods here must be at or near 125F (or 52C).
    >
    > Out in El Paso, TX, where the temps are about the same, but the humidity
    > seldom rises above 15% room temp drying is not only possible, but preferred.
    >
    > Drying at 100C is cooking, as that would be the boiling point of water.


    Yes - elders need cooking anyway. The question I've yet to discover is
    whether such long cooking did them no favours. I did it at the time
    because in the British climate here, room temp of 20C and around 60%
    RH sees fruits spoil, and I had such a glut I simply didnt see any
    other way to process them before they spoiled. I'll have to see what
    they taste like after 90 minutes cooking (IIRC).


    NT

  4. #4
    Shawn Martin Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On 2/14/2012 2:46 AM, NT wrote:
    > On Feb 13, 2:33 pm, Shawn Martin<panl...@starband.net> wrote:
    >> On 2/12/2012 10:16 AM, NT wrote:
    >>


    snip

    >> Out in El Paso, TX, where the temps are about the same, but the humidity
    >> seldom rises above 15% room temp drying is not only possible, but preferred.
    >>
    >> Drying at 100C is cooking, as that would be the boiling point of water.

    >
    > Yes - elders need cooking anyway. The question I've yet to discover is
    > whether such long cooking did them no favours. I did it at the time
    > because in the British climate here, room temp of 20C and around 60%
    > RH sees fruits spoil, and I had such a glut I simply didnt see any
    > other way to process them before they spoiled. I'll have to see what
    > they taste like after 90 minutes cooking (IIRC).
    >
    >
    > NT


    I understand the allure of drying, but if you are going to have to use
    energy to cook them, why not just can the berries? Make jam?


  5. #5
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 08:16:13 -0800 (PST), NT <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    >I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    >there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    >sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.
    >
    >And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?
    >

    We've never tried drying elderberries but we do freeze them.
    Elderberry pie has to be my most favourite and we freeze them in one
    pie quantities. Works well for us.

    Ross.
    Southern Ontario, Canada.

  6. #6
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Feb 14, 7:57*pm, Ross@home wrote:
    > On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 08:16:13 -0800 (PST), NT <meow2...@care2.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    > >I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    > >there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    > >sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.

    >
    > >And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?

    >
    > We've never tried drying elderberries but we do freeze them.
    > Elderberry pie has to be my most favourite and we freeze them in one
    > pie quantities. Works well for us.
    >
    > Ross.
    > Southern Ontario, Canada.


    I do too... but there's only so many I had space for!


    NT

  7. #7
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Feb 14, 6:58*pm, Shawn Martin <panl...@starband.net> wrote:
    > On 2/14/2012 2:46 AM, NT wrote:
    >
    > > On Feb 13, 2:33 pm, Shawn Martin<panl...@starband.net> *wrote:
    > >> On 2/12/2012 10:16 AM, NT wrote:

    >
    > snip
    >
    > >> Out in El Paso, TX, where the temps are about the same, but the humidity
    > >> seldom rises above 15% room temp drying is not only possible, but preferred.

    >
    > >> Drying at 100C is cooking, as that would be the boiling point of water..

    >
    > > Yes - elders need cooking anyway. The question I've yet to discover is
    > > whether such long cooking did them no favours. I did it at the time
    > > because in the British climate here, room temp of 20C and around 60%
    > > RH sees fruits spoil, and I had such a glut I simply didnt see any
    > > other way to process them before they spoiled. I'll have to see what
    > > they taste like after 90 minutes cooking (IIRC).

    >
    > > NT

    >
    > I understand the allure of drying, but if you are going to have to use
    > energy to cook them, why not just can the berries? *Make jam?


    Why not can? More work, more cost, more storage space, didn't have the
    time, and didnt have the citric acid on the day. Why not jam? I dont
    want to eat a pile of sugar as well, otherwise that would be a great
    option.

    I need some new elder recipes though, not entirely happy with what
    I've done with them so far.


    NT

  8. #8
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Feb 14, 7:57*pm, Ross@home wrote:
    > On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 08:16:13 -0800 (PST), NT <meow2...@care2.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    > >I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    > >there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    > >sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.

    >
    > >And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?

    >
    > We've never tried drying elderberries but we do freeze them.
    > Elderberry pie has to be my most favourite and we freeze them in one
    > pie quantities. Works well for us.
    >
    > Ross.
    > Southern Ontario, Canada.


    Do you have a nice recipe?


    NT

  9. #9
    Ross@home Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 03:27:40 -0800 (PST), NT <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On Feb 14, 7:57*pm, Ross@home wrote:
    >> On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 08:16:13 -0800 (PST), NT <meow2...@care2.com>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    >> >I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    >> >there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    >> >sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.

    >>
    >> >And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?

    >>
    >> We've never tried drying elderberries but we do freeze them.
    >> Elderberry pie has to be my most favourite and we freeze them in one
    >> pie quantities. Works well for us.
    >>
    >> Ross.
    >> Southern Ontario, Canada.

    >
    >Do you have a nice recipe?



    Easy and delicious.
    This one is from a recipe book entitled "Food That Really Schmecks" by
    local author Edna Staebler, mostly documenting Old Order Mennonite
    recipes from this region. One of our most used, most worn & stained
    cookbooks, purchased when it first came out in 1968. We also have her
    "More Food That Really Schmecks" and "Schmecks Appeal" cookbooks, all
    are definitely not for weight-watchers ;-).

    @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    Elderberry Pie

    Pies

    pastry for 2 crust 9 inch pie
    3 cups elderberries
    4 tablespoon flour
    1 cup granulated sugar
    2 tablespoon butter

    Mix the sugar and flour; sprinkle 1/3 of the mixture on the bottom of
    the pastry. Put in half the elderberries and sprinkle with half the
    remaining sugar/flour mixture. Put in remaining berries and sprinkle
    remaining suga/flour mixture on top. Dot with butter. Add top crust
    and cut vents for steam.
    Bake for 45 minutes in a pre-heated 350F oven.

    From: Edna Staebler's "Food That Really Schmecks", pp.230

    Yield: 6 servings


    ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.88 **

  10. #10
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Feb 16, 3:51*pm, Ross@home wrote:
    > On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 03:27:40 -0800 (PST), NT <meow2...@care2.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > >On Feb 14, 7:57*pm, Ross@home wrote:
    > >> On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 08:16:13 -0800 (PST), NT <meow2...@care2.com>
    > >> wrote:

    >
    > >> >I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    > >> >I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    > >> >there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    > >> >sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.

    >
    > >> >And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?

    >
    > >> We've never tried drying elderberries but we do freeze them.
    > >> Elderberry pie has to be my most favourite and we freeze them in one
    > >> pie quantities. Works well for us.

    >
    > >> Ross.
    > >> Southern Ontario, Canada.

    >
    > >Do you have a nice recipe?

    >
    > Easy and delicious.
    > This one is from a recipe book entitled "Food That Really Schmecks" by
    > local author Edna Staebler, mostly documenting Old Order Mennonite
    > recipes from this region. One of our most used, most worn & stained
    > cookbooks, purchased when it first came out in 1968. We also have her
    > "More Food That Really Schmecks" and "Schmecks Appeal" cookbooks, all
    > are definitely not for weight-watchers ;-).
    >
    > @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format
    >
    > Elderberry Pie
    >
    > Pies
    >
    > * pastry for 2 crust 9 inch pie
    > 3 cups elderberries
    > 4 tablespoon flour
    > 1 cup granulated sugar
    > 2 tablespoon butter
    >
    > Mix the sugar and flour; sprinkle 1/3 of the mixture on the bottom of
    > the pastry. Put in half the elderberries and sprinkle with half the
    > remaining sugar/flour mixture. Put in remaining berries and sprinkle
    > remaining suga/flour mixture on top. Dot with butter. Add top crust
    > and cut vents for steam.
    > Bake for 45 minutes in a pre-heated 350F oven.
    >
    > From: *Edna Staebler's "Food That Really Schmecks", pp.230
    >
    > Yield: 6 servings
    >
    > ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.88 **


    Thank you. Next cookathon I'll try it out


    NT

  11. #11
    NT Guest

    Default Re: Hot Drying

    On Feb 17, 3:26*pm, NT <meow2...@care2.com> wrote:
    > On Feb 16, 3:51*pm, Ross@home wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Thu, 16 Feb 2012 03:27:40 -0800 (PST), NT <meow2...@care2.com>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > > >On Feb 14, 7:57*pm, Ross@home wrote:
    > > >> On Sun, 12 Feb 2012 08:16:13 -0800 (PST), NT <meow2...@care2.com>
    > > >> wrote:

    >
    > > >> >I have a batch of elderberries that were dried at 100C, but everywhere
    > > >> >I looked since recommends low temperature drying. I dont know why. Is
    > > >> >there any problem with hot dried berries? Elders are very lacking in
    > > >> >sugar, and the end result is dry and crisp rather than soft.

    >
    > > >> >And while I'm here, doesnt lukewarm drying promote moulds etc?

    >
    > > >> We've never tried drying elderberries but we do freeze them.
    > > >> Elderberry pie has to be my most favourite and we freeze them in one
    > > >> pie quantities. Works well for us.

    >
    > > >> Ross.
    > > >> Southern Ontario, Canada.

    >
    > > >Do you have a nice recipe?

    >
    > > Easy and delicious.
    > > This one is from a recipe book entitled "Food That Really Schmecks" by
    > > local author Edna Staebler, mostly documenting Old Order Mennonite
    > > recipes from this region. One of our most used, most worn & stained
    > > cookbooks, purchased when it first came out in 1968. We also have her
    > > "More Food That Really Schmecks" and "Schmecks Appeal" cookbooks, all
    > > are definitely not for weight-watchers ;-).

    >
    > > @@@@@ Now You're Cooking! Export Format

    >
    > > Elderberry Pie

    >
    > > Pies

    >
    > > * pastry for 2 crust 9 inch pie
    > > 3 cups elderberries
    > > 4 tablespoon flour
    > > 1 cup granulated sugar
    > > 2 tablespoon butter

    >
    > > Mix the sugar and flour; sprinkle 1/3 of the mixture on the bottom of
    > > the pastry. Put in half the elderberries and sprinkle with half the
    > > remaining sugar/flour mixture. Put in remaining berries and sprinkle
    > > remaining suga/flour mixture on top. Dot with butter. Add top crust
    > > and cut vents for steam.
    > > Bake for 45 minutes in a pre-heated 350F oven.

    >
    > > From: *Edna Staebler's "Food That Really Schmecks", pp.230

    >
    > > Yield: 6 servings

    >
    > > ** Exported from Now You're Cooking! v5.88 **

    >
    > Thank you. Next cookathon I'll try it out
    >
    > NT


    I made one. Yum Thank you, this is defintely the way to use elders.
    I did replace the sugar with saccharin.


    NT

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