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Thread: Here we go again

  1. #1
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Here we go again

    Miz Anne brought in a bucket of green beans this morning plus she
    thinned the carrot crop again. Along with some fresh lettuce from the
    garden, carrots, summer squash, fresh cukes and herbs I reckon we're
    going to have a nice salad for lunch.

    The green beans I will blanch and freeze, there's not enough to run the
    pressure canner. Will go out in a bit and pick the chard and then cut a
    lot of oregano, basil, and thyme to dehydrate for winter use. Nature's
    bounty is flowing into the house.

  2. #2
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Here we go again

    George Shirley wrote:
    > Miz Anne brought in a bucket of green beans this morning plus she
    > thinned the carrot crop again. Along with some fresh lettuce from the
    > garden, carrots, summer squash, fresh cukes and herbs I reckon we're
    > going to have a nice salad for lunch.
    >
    > The green beans I will blanch and freeze, there's not enough to run the
    > pressure canner. Will go out in a bit and pick the chard and then cut a
    > lot of oregano, basil, and thyme to dehydrate for winter use. Nature's
    > bounty is flowing into the house.



    I think (hope!) that our snow and freezing nights are over. I have
    planted all the flowerpots for both front and back porches this week
    plus the herb whiskey barrel.

    Now the garden needs planting for both cutting flowers (zinnias,
    snapdragons, and blue salvia) plus a few vegetables: tomatoes,
    golden zucchini, chard (ugh), and some romaine. It get very hot here,
    we get little rain after June, and we have a short season so it's
    useless to plant peppers, eggplant, and things that go to seed quickly
    in the heat. We've had some nice peas in past years and green beans,
    but we're lazy about picking them and I don't like either one when they
    are old and tough.

    We also have been gifted with a beehive this week and evidently the
    place chosen for it (by the donor and DH) was on one level of the garden
    so I'm a little leery about going close enough to plant and possibly
    disturb the bees as they are getting acclimated. I haven't been stung
    in years by anything and I'm not afraid but I'd rather avoid it if I
    could. ;-)

    Happy harvesting!

    gloria p

  3. #3
    Nick Cramer Guest

    Default Re: Here we go again

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [ . . . ]
    > We also have been gifted with a beehive this week and evidently the
    > place chosen for it (by the donor and DH) was on one level of the garden
    > so I'm a little leery about going close enough to plant and possibly
    > disturb the bees as they are getting acclimated. I haven't been stung
    > in years by anything and I'm not afraid but I'd rather avoid it if I
    > could. ;-)
    >
    > Happy harvesting!


    Good luck with your bees, Gloria. Besides the germination they do, honey is
    a wonderful byproduct of their efforts. When I was a kid, we had three
    hives at my Grandmother's place. I used to love watching them flying in and
    out, and of course, getting that honey in the Fall. They didn't sting much
    or bad, but those reddish-brown wasps . . . yeaow!

    --
    Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their
    families: https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/ Thank a Veteran!
    Support Our Troops: http://anymarine.com/ You are not forgotten.
    Thanks ! ! ~Semper Fi~ USMC 1365061

  4. #4
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Bees (was Re: Here we go again)

    Nick Cramer wrote:

    >
    > Good luck with your bees, Gloria. Besides the germination they do, honey is
    > a wonderful byproduct of their efforts. When I was a kid, we had three
    > hives at my Grandmother's place. I used to love watching them flying in and
    > out, and of course, getting that honey in the Fall. They didn't sting much
    > or bad, but those reddish-brown wasps . . . yeaow!




    Thanks. They don't really belong to us, we are housing them for a
    beekeeper who needed to relocate a bunch of hives. We met him when he
    took a swarm out of a tree across the street from us. We will get some
    honey, I'm sure, but he said he'd do all the labor involved unless we
    really get into the project. They are about 3 weeks too late to
    pollinate our apricots this year but we have a load of olive-pit sized
    fruit on the trees and you could hear the whole tree humming with bees
    when they were in flower.

    For the most part, I think they are too busy to sting much. I have
    also found that they don't come out of the hive until the sun warms it,
    and they return to it as soon as it begins to cool down in the evening
    so we have a time window when we can plant the garden pretty safely.

    Thanks again for the encouragement,

    gloria p

  5. #5
    Nick Cramer Guest

    Default Re: Bees (was Re: Here we go again)

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Nick Cramer wrote:


    > > Good luck with your bees, Gloria. Besides the germination they do,
    > > honey is a wonderful byproduct of their efforts. When I was a kid, we
    > > had three hives at my Grandmother's place. I used to love watching them
    > > flying in and out, and of course, getting that honey in the Fall. They
    > > didn't sting much or bad, but those reddish-brown wasps . . . yeaow!

    >
    > Thanks. They don't really belong to us, we are housing them for a
    > beekeeper who needed to relocate a bunch of hives. We met him when he
    > took a swarm out of a tree across the street from us. We will get some
    > honey, I'm sure, but he said he'd do all the labor involved unless we
    > really get into the project. They are about 3 weeks too late to
    > pollinate our apricots this year but we have a load of olive-pit sized
    > fruit on the trees and you could hear the whole tree humming with bees
    > when they were in flower.
    >
    > For the most part, I think they are too busy to sting much. I have
    > also found that they don't come out of the hive until the sun warms it,
    > and they return to it as soon as it begins to cool down in the evening
    > so we have a time window when we can plant the garden pretty safely.
    >
    > Thanks again for the encouragement.


    As long as you don't block their flight path or threaten the hive (don't
    bump into it when they're active!) you'll be safe. You'll notice a few
    'guard bees' around the entrance. They're there to keep 'foreign' bees out,
    not to attack you. You can learn more on alt.hobbies.beekeeping and
    sci.agriculture.beekeeping.

    --
    Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their
    families: https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/ Thank a Veteran!
    Support Our Troops: http://anymarine.com/ You are not forgotten.
    Thanks ! ! ~Semper Fi~ USMC 1365061

  6. #6
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Bees (was Re: Here we go again)

    Nick Cramer wrote:

    >
    > As long as you don't block their flight path or threaten the hive (don't
    > bump into it when they're active!) you'll be safe. You'll notice a few
    > 'guard bees' around the entrance. They're there to keep 'foreign' bees out,
    > not to attack you. You can learn more on alt.hobbies.beekeeping and
    > sci.agriculture.beekeeping.
    >


    Thanks, Nick, I've looked at both sites. The former has had no postings
    in weeks, the latter seems a mixture of too technical and too many
    trolls. I may be more successful with library books.

    gloria p

  7. #7
    Libby Guest

    Default Re: Bees (was Re: Here we go again)

    On May 23, 2:58*pm, "gloria.p" <gpues...@comcast.net> wrote:
    > Nick Cramer wrote:
    >
    > > As long as you don't block their flight path or threaten the hive (don't
    > > bump into it when they're active!) you'll be safe. You'll notice a few
    > > 'guard bees' around the entrance. They're there to keep 'foreign' bees out,
    > > not to attack you. You can learn more on alt.hobbies.beekeeping and
    > > sci.agriculture.beekeeping.

    >
    > Thanks, Nick, I've looked at both sites. *The former has had no postings
    > in weeks, the latter seems a mixture of too technical and too many
    > trolls. *I may be more successful with library books.
    >
    > gloria p



    Hello!

    Continuing off topic, I know, but if you're interested in keeping bees
    yourself, I suggest you join a local bee club. There are lots of them
    around, just google "bee club (your location)" or ask the beekeeper
    who has the hive in your backyard about local clubs.

    I didn't even know that these existed, but when my husband started
    thinking about keeping bees, that's what a local beekeeper
    recommended. We've been to a couple meetings and it's really
    fascinating! You can meet lots of people from all experience levels
    and learn a lot.

    We started two hives two weeks ago, and we're hoping to have enough
    honey by the end of the summer to make mead.

    Libby

  8. #8
    Nick Cramer Guest

    Default Re: Bees (was Re: Here we go again)

    Libby <[email protected]> wrote:
    > [ . . . ]
    > We started two hives two weeks ago, and we're hoping to have enough
    > honey by the end of the summer to make mead.


    Check out rec.crafts.meadmaking and rec.crafts.brewing, too.

    --
    Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their
    families: https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/ Thank a Veteran!
    Support Our Troops: http://anymarine.com/ You are not forgotten.
    Thanks ! ! ~Semper Fi~ USMC 1365061

  9. #9
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Bees (was Re: Here we go again)



    We planted the garden today with seedlings: Tomatoes and golden
    zucchini squash on two levels, cutting flowers for bouquets on the
    other: zinnias, snapdragons, blue salvia.

    The beehive is on the middle level of the terraced garden and we got
    within ~12 inches of the hive when planting. The bees were completely
    disinterested in us. Whew. I hate wasps and yellowjackets but I am
    surprisingly unafraid of the bees.

    gloria p

  10. #10
    Nick Cramer Guest

    Default Re: Bees (was Re: Here we go again)

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > We planted the garden today with seedlings: Tomatoes and golden
    > zucchini squash on two levels, cutting flowers for bouquets on the
    > other: zinnias, snapdragons, blue salvia.
    >
    > The beehive is on the middle level of the terraced garden and we got
    > within ~12 inches of the hive when planting. The bees were completely
    > disinterested in us. Whew. I hate wasps and yellowjackets but I am
    > surprisingly unafraid of the bees.


    That is too cool, Glo! Are you ready to try giving the bees a drink of
    water from your hand? It's fun!

    BTW Preservation with the use of honey or sugar was well known to the
    earliest cultures. Fruits kept in honey were commonplace. In ancient Greece
    quince was mixed with honey, dried somewhat and packed tightly into jars.
    The Romans improved on the method by cooking the quince and honey producing
    a solid texture.

    --
    Nick, KI6VAV. Support severely wounded and disabled Veterans and their
    families: https://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/ Thank a Veteran!
    Support Our Troops: http://anymarine.com/ You are not forgotten.
    Thanks ! ! ~Semper Fi~ USMC 1365061

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