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Thread: Freezing onions

  1. #1
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Freezing onions

    The Texas 1015Y sweet onions are in stores now and I wondered if they
    could be frozen for later use. Found a University of Nebraska site that
    said yes and here's how to do it.

    Today I chopped in the food processor, two large 1015Y onions that
    weighed right at four pounds for the two. Biggest darned onions I ever
    saw, almost bought a whole sack of them but had no place to store them.

    The process is to peel the onions, cut off top and root ends, cut into
    one-inch squares and then put no more than two cups into the food
    processor at a time. I then pulsed the onions about three times,
    chopping them into recognizable pieces. Once chopped I took the chopped
    onions out of the processor and spread them onto a large bun sheet. Once
    I had a layer about a half inch thick over the whole sheet I covered
    them with plastic wrap and then stuck them in the freezer. They will be
    in there for two hours and about an hour of that has gone by already.
    Once frozen I will cut them into one-cup squares, insert into a vacuum
    bag, and then seal and put back into the freezer. Theory is that the
    onions will not degrade or lose flavor this way. I will post back after
    I open one of the bags a few days down the road.

    If it works well I will probably go ahead and buy enough to put up about
    twenty cups of chopped onion, that should be enough to last us a year
    and I do love those sweet onions.

    George

  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Freezing onions

    On 5/18/2011 12:06 PM, George Shirley wrote:
    > The Texas 1015Y sweet onions are in stores now and I wondered if they
    > could be frozen for later use. Found a University of Nebraska site that
    > said yes and here's how to do it.
    >
    > Today I chopped in the food processor, two large 1015Y onions that
    > weighed right at four pounds for the two. Biggest darned onions I ever
    > saw, almost bought a whole sack of them but had no place to store them.
    >
    > The process is to peel the onions, cut off top and root ends, cut into
    > one-inch squares and then put no more than two cups into the food
    > processor at a time. I then pulsed the onions about three times,
    > chopping them into recognizable pieces. Once chopped I took the chopped
    > onions out of the processor and spread them onto a large bun sheet. Once
    > I had a layer about a half inch thick over the whole sheet I covered
    > them with plastic wrap and then stuck them in the freezer. They will be
    > in there for two hours and about an hour of that has gone by already.
    > Once frozen I will cut them into one-cup squares, insert into a vacuum
    > bag, and then seal and put back into the freezer. Theory is that the
    > onions will not degrade or lose flavor this way. I will post back after
    > I open one of the bags a few days down the road.
    >
    > If it works well I will probably go ahead and buy enough to put up about
    > twenty cups of chopped onion, that should be enough to last us a year
    > and I do love those sweet onions.
    >
    > George

    Vacuum bagged eight one-cup servings of the onions this afternoon.
    Worked well and the plastic wrap kept them from stinking up the freezer.
    You have to work fast putting them in the bags as they tend to thaw
    quickly when exposed to room temperature. Next time I will put them in
    one-cup piles on the bun sheet and that will help me to get them bagged
    much more quickly.

  3. #3
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Freezing onions

    On 5/18/2011 11:06 AM, George Shirley wrote:

    >
    > The process is to peel the onions, cut off top and root ends, cut into
    > one-inch squares and then put no more than two cups into the food
    > processor at a time. I then pulsed the onions about three times,
    > chopping them into recognizable pieces. Once chopped I took the chopped
    > onions out of the processor and spread them onto a large bun sheet. Once
    > I had a layer about a half inch thick over the whole sheet I covered
    > them with plastic wrap and then stuck them in the freezer. They will be
    > in there for two hours and about an hour of that has gone by already.
    > Once frozen I will cut them into one-cup squares, insert into a vacuum
    > bag, and then seal and put back into the freezer. Theory is that the
    > onions will not degrade or lose flavor this way. I will post back after
    > I open one of the bags a few days down the road.
    >




    Please do let us know, George. My experience is that the flavor is
    OK but the texture gets really mushy after thawing because the cells
    have ruptured, releasing a lot of the moisture so you can't use them in
    a recipe where browning or crispness is important.

    I hope they turn out well for you.

    gloria p

  4. #4
    Wilson Guest

    Default Re: Freezing onions

    On 05/18/11 7:34 PM, sometime in the recent past gloria.p posted this:
    > On 5/18/2011 11:06 AM, George Shirley wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> The process is to peel the onions, cut off top and root ends, cut into
    >> one-inch squares and then put no more than two cups into the food
    >> processor at a time. I then pulsed the onions about three times,
    >> chopping them into recognizable pieces. Once chopped I took the chopped
    >> onions out of the processor and spread them onto a large bun sheet. Once
    >> I had a layer about a half inch thick over the whole sheet I covered
    >> them with plastic wrap and then stuck them in the freezer. They will be
    >> in there for two hours and about an hour of that has gone by already.
    >> Once frozen I will cut them into one-cup squares, insert into a vacuum
    >> bag, and then seal and put back into the freezer. Theory is that the
    >> onions will not degrade or lose flavor this way. I will post back after
    >> I open one of the bags a few days down the road.
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > Please do let us know, George. My experience is that the flavor is
    > OK but the texture gets really mushy after thawing because the cells
    > have ruptured, releasing a lot of the moisture so you can't use them in
    > a recipe where browning or crispness is important.
    >
    > I hope they turn out well for you.
    >
    > gloria p

    We saute our onions first then freeze them. They come out pretty much the
    way they went in. What I wonder about freezing them raw is the trouble with
    freezing any other vegetables raw - enzymes turn the sugars into starch and
    the flavor degrades. Curious to find out these turn out George and wonder
    how much the flavor will differ from fresh.

    --
    Wilson 44.69, -67.3

  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Freezing onions

    On 5/20/2011 10:40 AM, Wilson wrote:
    > On 05/18/11 7:34 PM, sometime in the recent past gloria.p posted this:
    >> On 5/18/2011 11:06 AM, George Shirley wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> The process is to peel the onions, cut off top and root ends, cut into
    >>> one-inch squares and then put no more than two cups into the food
    >>> processor at a time. I then pulsed the onions about three times,
    >>> chopping them into recognizable pieces. Once chopped I took the chopped
    >>> onions out of the processor and spread them onto a large bun sheet. Once
    >>> I had a layer about a half inch thick over the whole sheet I covered
    >>> them with plastic wrap and then stuck them in the freezer. They will be
    >>> in there for two hours and about an hour of that has gone by already.
    >>> Once frozen I will cut them into one-cup squares, insert into a vacuum
    >>> bag, and then seal and put back into the freezer. Theory is that the
    >>> onions will not degrade or lose flavor this way. I will post back after
    >>> I open one of the bags a few days down the road.
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Please do let us know, George. My experience is that the flavor is
    >> OK but the texture gets really mushy after thawing because the cells
    >> have ruptured, releasing a lot of the moisture so you can't use them in
    >> a recipe where browning or crispness is important.
    >>
    >> I hope they turn out well for you.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    > We saute our onions first then freeze them. They come out pretty much
    > the way they went in. What I wonder about freezing them raw is the
    > trouble with freezing any other vegetables raw - enzymes turn the sugars
    > into starch and the flavor degrades. Curious to find out these turn out
    > George and wonder how much the flavor will differ from fresh.
    >

    I tried a cup of the frozen chopped onions in a pasta dish a couple of
    days ago. As expected they released a lot of water but that cooked down
    in the dish and the onion flavor was very close to fresh.

    I think next time I will just pack them in the vac bag and freeze them
    that way to see if it works. If not I may try Wilson's method, sounds as
    though it works well.

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