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Thread: Food Safety in the news

  1. #1
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Food Safety in the news

    Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2

    Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>


  2. #2
    songbird Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    George Shirley wrote:

    > Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    > suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2


    not something i'd ever want to experience...


    > Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>


    but not PBDC's!

    i will be putting up more of those tomorrow.


    songbird

  3. #3
    pheasant16 Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    George Shirley wrote:
    > Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    > suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    >
    > Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>
    >


    Brings back pleasant memories of my mother in law. She saw something on
    a news program about salmonella in chicken so was going to quit eating
    it, but thought nothing of BWB beets. Told her diarrhea won't kill you
    whereas botulism will. After she thought about it, she decided yeah,
    chicken might still be OK after all.

  4. #4
    Lawrence Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    >suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    >
    >Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>


    <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/foodsafetyinfosheet-8-2-12-nc.jpg>

    "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s
    dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea
    level."


    Holy Cow!!


  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    On 8/13/2012 10:37 AM, Lawrence wrote:
    > On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    >> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    >>
    >> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>

    >
    > <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/foodsafetyinfosheet-8-2-12-nc.jpg>
    >
    > "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s
    > dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea
    > level."
    >
    >
    > Holy Cow!!
    >

    Yup! I've put up canned beets since the middle sixties using that same
    pressure and time. The raw beets, carefully skinned and cleaned, end up
    cooked to perfection when properly pressure canned. Just need some
    heating up on the stove when you're ready to eat them.

    Pickled beets are another story, the vinegar and the proper timing in
    the boiling water bath give you the PBDC delights with no danger involved.

    That's why so many folks on this newsgroup tout state agriculture sites
    with food safety, most states do have them. The premier site for several
    years now has been the U of Ga food safety site.

    Having operated high pressure industrial boilers eons ago I only use
    real pressure dial gauges on my forty odd year old pressure canner. I
    just don't trust the jiggler or weight gauges, I need the reassurance of
    the pressure gauge. Just a minor foible on my part, probably caused by
    sitting in a control room on a graveyard shift watching the twelve-inch
    dial gauge on the panel all night. You only have to have a boiler blow
    up nearby once to learn to watch gauges closely. <G>

  6. #6
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    On 8/13/2012 9:37 AM, Lawrence wrote:
    > On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    >> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    >>
    >> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>

    >
    > <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wordpress.com/2012/08/foodsafetyinfosheet-8-2-12-nc.jpg>
    >
    > "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s
    > dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea
    > level."
    >
    >
    > Holy Cow!!
    >



    Not so surprising since these aren't PICKLED beets and there's no acidic
    medium involved. Root crops are botulism magnets.

    gloria p

  7. #7
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    In article <5026916e$0$7705$[email protected]> ,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    > suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    >
    > Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>


    I rest my case.
    It should be noted, however, that the deadly beets were not pickled.
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of June 6, 2012

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    In article <k0bc8e$qod$[email protected]>,
    gloria p <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 8/13/2012 9:37 AM, Lawrence wrote:
    > > On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    > >> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    > >>
    > >> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>

    > >
    > > <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wo...afetyinfosheet
    > > -8-2-12-nc.jpg>
    > >
    > > "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s
    > > dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea
    > > level."
    > >
    > >
    > > Holy Cow!!


    > Root crops are botulism magnets.
    >
    > gloria p


    Yup. C. botulinum is in the soil.
    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of June 6, 2012

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    In article <50293054$0$7487$[email protected]> ,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On 8/13/2012 10:37 AM, Lawrence wrote:
    > > On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    > >> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    > >>
    > >> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>

    > >
    > > <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wo...afetyinfosheet
    > > -8-2-12-nc.jpg>
    > >
    > > "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s
    > > dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea
    > > level."
    > >
    > >
    > > Holy Cow!!
    > >

    > Yup! I've put up canned beets since the middle sixties using that same
    > pressure and time. The raw beets, carefully skinned and cleaned, end up
    > cooked to perfection when properly pressure canned. Just need some
    > heating up on the stove when you're ready to eat them.
    >
    > Pickled beets are another story, the vinegar and the proper timing in
    > the boiling water bath give you the PBDC delights with no danger involved.
    >
    > That's why so many folks on this newsgroup tout state agriculture sites
    > with food safety, most states do have them. The premier site for several
    > years now has been the U of Ga food safety site.
    >
    > Having operated high pressure industrial boilers eons ago I only use
    > real pressure dial gauges on my forty odd year old pressure canner. I
    > just don't trust the jiggler or weight gauges,


    Why not a weighted gauge, Jorge, inasmuch as the jiggle indicates the
    release of pressure to keep it at the correct psi. At least that's what
    I understand about it.

    --
    Barb,
    http://www.barbschaller.com, as of June 6, 2012

  10. #10
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    On 8/17/2012 11:45 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <5026916e$0$7705$[email protected]> ,
    > George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    >> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    >>
    >> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>

    >
    > I rest my case.
    > It should be noted, however, that the deadly beets were not pickled.
    >

    It shouldn't matter to you, you don't even eat the pickled ones. <G>

    Got all the home canned product boxed up today, it will stay in the air
    conditioned house until we move. Don't want the storage locker to be
    full of exploding jars do we? With temps in the high nineties to low one
    hundreds that would be a real possibility. Just imagine exploding
    pickled beets strewn all over the place, police would think we were
    murdering people in there.

  11. #11
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    On 8/17/2012 11:47 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <50293054$0$7487$[email protected]> ,
    > George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 8/13/2012 10:37 AM, Lawrence wrote:
    >>> On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of
    >>>> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2
    >>>>
    >>>> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>
    >>>
    >>> <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wo...afetyinfosheet
    >>> -8-2-12-nc.jpg>
    >>>
    >>> "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s
    >>> dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea
    >>> level."
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Holy Cow!!
    >>>

    >> Yup! I've put up canned beets since the middle sixties using that same
    >> pressure and time. The raw beets, carefully skinned and cleaned, end up
    >> cooked to perfection when properly pressure canned. Just need some
    >> heating up on the stove when you're ready to eat them.
    >>
    >> Pickled beets are another story, the vinegar and the proper timing in
    >> the boiling water bath give you the PBDC delights with no danger involved.
    >>
    >> That's why so many folks on this newsgroup tout state agriculture sites
    >> with food safety, most states do have them. The premier site for several
    >> years now has been the U of Ga food safety site.
    >>
    >> Having operated high pressure industrial boilers eons ago I only use
    >> real pressure dial gauges on my forty odd year old pressure canner. I
    >> just don't trust the jiggler or weight gauges,

    >
    > Why not a weighted gauge, Jorge, inasmuch as the jiggle indicates the
    > release of pressure to keep it at the correct psi. At least that's what
    > I understand about it.
    >

    And you're right, look at my last paragraph. I used to be a boiler
    operator in a chemical plant, ran boilers that put out 600 lb steam and
    others that went as high as 3000 psig. Gauges are set in my mind, no
    jigglers on high pressure industrial boilers, just relief valves and no
    decent plant operator wants to hear the relief valve blowing useful
    steam to the atmosphere unless you have to scram the unit, ie. shut it
    down in emergency mode. It's a personal quirk, sort of like not eating
    beets. <G>

  12. #12
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    On Friday, August 17, 2012 6:20:54 PM UTC+1, George Shirley wrote:
    > On 8/17/2012 11:47 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >
    > > In article <50293054$0$7487$[email protected]> ,

    >
    > > George Shirley wrote:

    >
    > >

    >
    > >> On 8/13/2012 10:37 AM, Lawrence wrote:

    >
    > >>> On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley wrote
    > >>>

    >
    > >>>> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of

    >
    > >>>> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2

    >
    > >>>>

    >
    > >>>> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>

    >
    > >>>

    >
    > >>> <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wo...afetyinfosheet

    >
    > >>> -8-2-12-nc.jpg>

    >
    > >>>

    >
    > >>> "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s

    >
    > >>> dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea

    >
    > >>> level."

    >
    > >>>

    >
    > >>>

    >
    > >>> Holy Cow!!

    >
    > >>>

    >
    > >> Yup! I've put up canned beets since the middle sixties using that same

    >
    > >> pressure and time. The raw beets, carefully skinned and cleaned, end up

    >
    > >> cooked to perfection when properly pressure canned. Just need some

    >
    > >> heating up on the stove when you're ready to eat them.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Pickled beets are another story, the vinegar and the proper timing in

    >
    > >> the boiling water bath give you the PBDC delights with no danger involved.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> That's why so many folks on this newsgroup tout state agriculture sites

    >
    > >> with food safety, most states do have them. The premier site for several

    >
    > >> years now has been the U of Ga food safety site.

    >
    > >>

    >
    > >> Having operated high pressure industrial boilers eons ago I only use

    >
    > >> real pressure dial gauges on my forty odd year old pressure canner. I

    >
    > >> just don't trust the jiggler or weight gauges,

    >
    > >

    >
    > > Why not a weighted gauge, Jorge, inasmuch as the jiggle indicates the

    >
    > > release of pressure to keep it at the correct psi. At least that's what

    >
    > > I understand about it.

    >
    > >

    >
    > And you're right, look at my last paragraph. I used to be a boiler
    >
    > operator in a chemical plant, ran boilers that put out 600 lb steam and
    >
    > others that went as high as 3000 psig. Gauges are set in my mind, no
    >
    > jigglers on high pressure industrial boilers, just relief valves and no
    >
    > decent plant operator wants to hear the relief valve blowing useful
    >
    > steam to the atmosphere unless you have to scram the unit, ie. shut it
    >
    > down in emergency mode. It's a personal quirk, sort of like not eating
    >
    > beets. <G>


    I would have thought a weight & lever to be much more reliable than a cheapo pressure gauge.


    NT

  13. #13
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Food Safety in the news

    On 9/15/2012 1:10 PM, [email protected] wrote:
    > On Friday, August 17, 2012 6:20:54 PM UTC+1, George Shirley wrote:
    >> On 8/17/2012 11:47 AM, Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    >>
    >>> In article <50293054$0$7487$[email protected]> ,

    >>
    >>> George Shirley wrote:

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >>>> On 8/13/2012 10:37 AM, Lawrence wrote:

    >>
    >>>>> On Sat, 11 Aug 2012 12:08:02 -0500, George Shirley wrote
    >>>>>

    >>
    >>>>>> Here's the URL about some folks trying the boiling water bath method of

    >>
    >>>>>> suicide: http://tinyurl.com/97k6tw2

    >>
    >>>>>>

    >>
    >>>>>> Barb should be happy, it involved Beet Dirt Chunks. <G>

    >>
    >>>>>

    >>
    >>>>> <http://foodsafetyinfosheets.files.wo...afetyinfosheet

    >>
    >>>>> -8-2-12-nc.jpg>

    >>
    >>>>>

    >>
    >>>>> "A pint of beets needs to be processed for 30 minutes at 11 psi if using s

    >>
    >>>>> dial guage (or 10 psi if using a weighted guage) pressure canner at sea

    >>
    >>>>> level."

    >>
    >>>>>

    >>
    >>>>>

    >>
    >>>>> Holy Cow!!

    >>
    >>>>>

    >>
    >>>> Yup! I've put up canned beets since the middle sixties using that same

    >>
    >>>> pressure and time. The raw beets, carefully skinned and cleaned, end up

    >>
    >>>> cooked to perfection when properly pressure canned. Just need some

    >>
    >>>> heating up on the stove when you're ready to eat them.

    >>
    >>>>

    >>
    >>>> Pickled beets are another story, the vinegar and the proper timing in

    >>
    >>>> the boiling water bath give you the PBDC delights with no danger involved.

    >>
    >>>>

    >>
    >>>> That's why so many folks on this newsgroup tout state agriculture sites

    >>
    >>>> with food safety, most states do have them. The premier site for several

    >>
    >>>> years now has been the U of Ga food safety site.

    >>
    >>>>

    >>
    >>>> Having operated high pressure industrial boilers eons ago I only use

    >>
    >>>> real pressure dial gauges on my forty odd year old pressure canner. I

    >>
    >>>> just don't trust the jiggler or weight gauges,

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >>> Why not a weighted gauge, Jorge, inasmuch as the jiggle indicates the

    >>
    >>> release of pressure to keep it at the correct psi. At least that's what

    >>
    >>> I understand about it.

    >>
    >>>

    >>
    >> And you're right, look at my last paragraph. I used to be a boiler
    >>
    >> operator in a chemical plant, ran boilers that put out 600 lb steam and
    >>
    >> others that went as high as 3000 psig. Gauges are set in my mind, no
    >>
    >> jigglers on high pressure industrial boilers, just relief valves and no
    >>
    >> decent plant operator wants to hear the relief valve blowing useful
    >>
    >> steam to the atmosphere unless you have to scram the unit, ie. shut it
    >>
    >> down in emergency mode. It's a personal quirk, sort of like not eating
    >>
    >> beets. <G>

    >
    > I would have thought a weight & lever to be much more reliable than a cheapo pressure gauge.
    >
    >
    > NT
    >

    Pressure canner gauges are not cheapo, the ones I buy are fifteen bucks
    U.S. per gauge. I have them tested annually by a local outfit that works
    with heavy industry to check gauges, that's another fifteen bucks. If
    you want to be precise about everything you get good equipment. I could
    easily go to the jiggler type of pressure release, might even be easier.
    With a pressure gauge you have to be very familiar with your stove and
    how to adjust the heat. That's one of the reasons I prefer gas stoves,
    infinite control over the heat, versus electric which has settings for a
    few levels of heat and are slow to cool down. When we used electric I
    had to move the pressure canner to a cool spot on the stove top in order
    to allow it to cool down properly, otherwise you went over the timed
    canning period. Messed up a few pots of jars until I figured that out
    about 40 years ago.

    It all depends on how familiar with your stove you are and also how
    picky you are. I'm very picky with my canning, been doing it since I was
    about eight years old and, to my knowledge, haven't poisoned anyone yet. <G>

    Our spring garden is rapidly playing out and we're not planting a fall
    garden here. So far the house has been shown to four prospective buyers
    in the last two weeks, no action yet. Today I fixed a clicking in one of
    the ceiling fans, twenty minutes to take the blades and motor cover off,
    ten seconds to fix the clicking, a wire nut was against the motor cover
    and a slight wobble made it click.

    Got sweet chiles to wash, chop, and freeze, better go do it.

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