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Thread: Dang!

  1. #1
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Dang!

    Still wanting to make pear mincemeat and all the pears I could get for
    free dropped their fruit already. Went to Kroger this afternoon and
    bought ten lbs for a buck a lb. Reckon sometime tomorrow I will make
    pear mincemeat. Since I don't care for raisins and can't get real
    currants down here reckon I will sub in dried blueberries and cranberries.

    George

  2. #2
    Sunny Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On Thu, 01 Sep 2011 17:53:11 -0500, George Shirley
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Still wanting to make pear mincemeat and all the pears I could get for
    >free dropped their fruit already. Went to Kroger this afternoon and
    >bought ten lbs for a buck a lb. Reckon sometime tomorrow I will make
    >pear mincemeat. Since I don't care for raisins and can't get real
    >currants down here reckon I will sub in dried blueberries and cranberries.
    >
    >George


    Perhaps it's time to address an issue I've had for a while. I was
    about to ask for a recipe for mincemeat and realized everytime I've
    asked for a recipe I've been given a link or a run-a-round. I would
    hope the more experienced preservers would be willing to help we
    newbies with their recipes and tips. Please consider that we respect
    the extensive knowledge and experience most of you have. Is it too
    much to ask for you to mentor we beginners?

    Respectfully,
    Lou

  3. #3
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On 09/01/2011 03:53 PM, George Shirley wrote:
    > Still wanting to make pear mincemeat and all the pears I could get for
    > free dropped their fruit already. Went to Kroger this afternoon and
    > bought ten lbs for a buck a lb. Reckon sometime tomorrow I will make
    > pear mincemeat. Since I don't care for raisins and can't get real
    > currants down here reckon I will sub in dried blueberries and cranberries.


    Oh, that sounds WONDERFUL.

    Serene

    --
    http://www.momfoodproject.com

  4. #4
    Carol S Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?.....Carol


  5. #5
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Dang!


    "Carol S" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    > it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?.....Carol


    Carol, do you mean beef suet?



    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk


  6. #6
    Carol S Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    Ophelia.....no not suet....more like shredded beef....the Amish make it
    that way alot....Carol


  7. #7
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Dang!


    "Carol S" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Ophelia.....no not suet....more like shredded beef....the Amish make it
    > that way alot....Carol


    Ok. That is how our (UK) mincemeat started out many years ago but changed
    to suet.
    I found this in wiki for you. It gives a 19 century recipe which does
    actually uses beef.

    HTH

    O

    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk


  8. #8
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Dang!


    Oops here it is:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Minceme...century_recipe

    "Ophelia" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "Carol S" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> Ophelia.....no not suet....more like shredded beef....the Amish make it
    >> that way alot....Carol

    >
    > Ok. That is how our (UK) mincemeat started out many years ago but changed
    > to suet.
    > I found this in wiki for you. It gives a 19 century recipe which does
    > actually uses beef.
    >
    > HTH
    >
    > O
    >
    > --
    > http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk
    >



    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk


  9. #9
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On 9/1/2011 8:19 PM, Sunny wrote:
    > On Thu, 01 Sep 2011 17:53:11 -0500, George Shirley
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Still wanting to make pear mincemeat and all the pears I could get for
    >> free dropped their fruit already. Went to Kroger this afternoon and
    >> bought ten lbs for a buck a lb. Reckon sometime tomorrow I will make
    >> pear mincemeat. Since I don't care for raisins and can't get real
    >> currants down here reckon I will sub in dried blueberries and cranberries.
    >>
    >> George

    >
    > Perhaps it's time to address an issue I've had for a while. I was
    > about to ask for a recipe for mincemeat and realized everytime I've
    > asked for a recipe I've been given a link or a run-a-round. I would
    > hope the more experienced preservers would be willing to help we
    > newbies with their recipes and tips. Please consider that we respect
    > the extensive knowledge and experience most of you have. Is it too
    > much to ask for you to mentor we beginners?
    >
    > Respectfully,
    > Lou

    Most of us will willingly answer questions Lou, it's just that
    sometimes, particularly in "canning season" we're pretty busy. As for
    the links, most of the experienced canners on this newsgroup use the
    USDA safety rules for canning and, rather than spend time explaining how
    it works, will send you to the U of Georgia Food Safety website. As for
    recipes, many, if not most, of us use recipes from "So Easy To Preserve"
    or one of the Ball books. That's exactly how I'm making my pear
    mincemeat, from the Ball Big Book. Many internet recipes don't actually
    use food safety methods so I, for one, don't usually just send out such
    recipes.

    If you have specific questions feel free to post them here and, sooner
    or later, one or more of us will reply.

    George

  10. #10
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On 9/2/2011 12:23 AM, Carol S wrote:
    > George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    > it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?.....Carol
    >

    Just the fruit Carol, was your Dad a Brit? I don't remember ever eating
    mincemeat with beef in it here in the south. Brits I worked with years
    ago loved their meat mincemeat, usually in some sort of "pie."

  11. #11
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Dang!


    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4e60c59d$0$2762$[email protected] com...
    > On 9/2/2011 12:23 AM, Carol S wrote:
    >> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?.....Carol
    >>

    > Just the fruit Carol, was your Dad a Brit? I don't remember ever eating
    > mincemeat with beef in it here in the south. Brits I worked with years ago
    > loved their meat mincemeat, usually in some sort of "pie."


    But our mincemeat pie doesn't have fruit.


    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk


  12. #12
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On 9/2/2011 7:58 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    >
    > "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:4e60c59d$0$2762$[email protected] com...
    >> On 9/2/2011 12:23 AM, Carol S wrote:
    >>> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >>> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?.....Carol
    >>>

    >> Just the fruit Carol, was your Dad a Brit? I don't remember ever
    >> eating mincemeat with beef in it here in the south. Brits I worked
    >> with years ago loved their meat mincemeat, usually in some sort of "pie."

    >
    > But our mincemeat pie doesn't have fruit.
    >
    >

    I know, minced meat in Brit speak is what we call hamburger, that's if I
    remember correctly. Mincemeat pie in Great Britain is savory, not sweet.
    Again, an aging mind can remember things differently.

    I much preferred shepherd pie myself.

  13. #13
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Dang!


    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4e60dede$0$2914$[email protected] com...
    > On 9/2/2011 7:58 AM, Ophelia wrote:
    >>
    >> "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:4e60c59d$0$2762$[email protected] com...
    >>> On 9/2/2011 12:23 AM, Carol S wrote:
    >>>> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >>>> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?.....Carol
    >>>>
    >>> Just the fruit Carol, was your Dad a Brit? I don't remember ever
    >>> eating mincemeat with beef in it here in the south. Brits I worked
    >>> with years ago loved their meat mincemeat, usually in some sort of
    >>> "pie."

    >>
    >> But our mincemeat pie doesn't have fruit.
    >>
    >>

    > I know, minced meat in Brit speak is what we call hamburger, that's if I
    > remember correctly.


    I don't really know. I thought hamburger was that lump of minced meat
    cooked into a .... err... hamburger?

    Mincemeat pie in Great Britain is savory, not sweet.
    > Again, an aging mind can remember things differently.


    No it's not sweet. You remember it quite correctly. It is minced beef and
    onion with gravy in a pie

    > I much preferred shepherd pie myself.


    Each has its own charms

    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk


  14. #14
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    Carol S wrote:
    >
    > George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    > it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?


    I thought US "mincemeat" does not have meat the way Welsh Rabbit does
    not have rabbit. The name just happens to sound like it.

    Interesting that mincemeat in the UK means ground meat. The would make
    a mincemeat pie be in the pastie category.

  15. #15
    Stuart Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On 9/2/2011 10:35 AM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
    > Carol S wrote:
    >>
    >> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?

    >
    > I thought US "mincemeat" does not have meat the way Welsh Rabbit does
    > not have rabbit. The name just happens to sound like it.
    >
    > Interesting that mincemeat in the UK means ground meat. The would make
    > a mincemeat pie be in the pastie category.




    So much misinformation caused by ambiguity in British English

    There are two different uses of "mincemeat".

    "Minced meat" - two words - or "mince", is meat that has been ground -
    the meat is "minced". I can't remember if the etymology is from Latin or
    French.

    "Mincemeat" - one word - is a sweet, spiced mix of various fruits,
    usually including raisins, sultanas, cloves, cinnamon, and ginger. Its
    name derives from its origin as "cheap meat" - it was originally ground
    meat, but as meat got more expensive, more and more fruit got
    substituted until all that remained of the sweet ground meat mixture was
    the suet, or beef fat.

    A "mincemeat tart (or pie)" is a sweet, spiced, fruit tart - it is not a
    savoury "meat pie".

    Hope this helps!



    --
    Please keep replies to the newsgroup

    stuart "at" addictedtocanning "dot" com


  16. #16
    Stuart Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    Oh, here's the etymolgy:

    The "mince" in mincemeat comes from the Middle English mincen, and the
    Old French mincier both traceable to the Vulgar Latin minutiare and
    Latin minutia meaning smallness. The word mincemeat is an adaptation of
    an earlier term minced meat, meaning finely chopped meat. Meat was also
    a term for food in general, not only animal flesh.


    On 9/2/2011 10:50 AM, Stuart wrote:
    > On 9/2/2011 10:35 AM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >> Carol S wrote:
    >>>
    >>> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >>> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?

    >>
    >> I thought US "mincemeat" does not have meat the way Welsh Rabbit does
    >> not have rabbit. The name just happens to sound like it.
    >>
    >> Interesting that mincemeat in the UK means ground meat. The would make
    >> a mincemeat pie be in the pastie category.

    >
    >
    >
    > So much misinformation caused by ambiguity in British English
    >
    > There are two different uses of "mincemeat".
    >
    > "Minced meat" - two words - or "mince", is meat that has been ground -
    > the meat is "minced". I can't remember if the etymology is from Latin or
    > French.
    >
    > "Mincemeat" - one word - is a sweet, spiced mix of various fruits,
    > usually including raisins, sultanas, cloves, cinnamon, and ginger. Its
    > name derives from its origin as "cheap meat" - it was originally ground
    > meat, but as meat got more expensive, more and more fruit got
    > substituted until all that remained of the sweet ground meat mixture was
    > the suet, or beef fat.
    >
    > A "mincemeat tart (or pie)" is a sweet, spiced, fruit tart - it is not a
    > savoury "meat pie".
    >
    > Hope this helps!
    >
    >
    >



    --
    Please keep replies to the newsgroup

    stuart "at" addictedtocanning "dot" com

  17. #17
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Dang!


    "Stuart" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:9X68q.7793$[email protected]..
    > On 9/2/2011 10:35 AM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >> Carol S wrote:
    >>>
    >>> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >>> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?

    >>
    >> I thought US "mincemeat" does not have meat the way Welsh Rabbit does
    >> not have rabbit. The name just happens to sound like it.
    >>
    >> Interesting that mincemeat in the UK means ground meat. The would make
    >> a mincemeat pie be in the pastie category.

    >
    >
    >
    > So much misinformation caused by ambiguity in British English
    >
    > There are two different uses of "mincemeat".
    >
    > "Minced meat" - two words - or "mince", is meat that has been ground - the
    > meat is "minced". I can't remember if the etymology is from Latin or
    > French.
    >
    > "Mincemeat" - one word - is a sweet, spiced mix of various fruits, usually
    > including raisins, sultanas, cloves, cinnamon, and ginger. Its name
    > derives from its origin as "cheap meat" - it was originally ground meat,
    > but as meat got more expensive, more and more fruit got substituted until
    > all that remained of the sweet ground meat mixture was the suet, or beef
    > fat.
    >
    > A "mincemeat tart (or pie)" is a sweet, spiced, fruit tart - it is not a
    > savoury "meat pie".
    >
    > Hope this helps!


    Exactly right)

    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk


  18. #18
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On 9/2/2011 10:35 AM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
    > Carol S wrote:
    >>
    >> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?

    >
    > I thought US "mincemeat" does not have meat the way Welsh Rabbit does
    > not have rabbit. The name just happens to sound like it.
    >
    > Interesting that mincemeat in the UK means ground meat. The would make
    > a mincemeat pie be in the pastie category.

    Depends upon which part of Blighty you're from. I think Lady O is
    originally a Yorkie but lives in Glasgow now, that doesn't make her a
    Glaswegian though. At least according to my Scots friends. I don't think
    she's Cornish or she would refer to meat pasties. Gawd, I'm surprised I
    even remember what my many Brit friends taught me 28 years ago. Not to
    mention the Irish I worked with, they really eat strange things.

  19. #19
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Dang!

    On 9/2/2011 10:50 AM, Stuart wrote:
    > On 9/2/2011 10:35 AM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >> Carol S wrote:
    >>>
    >>> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >>> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?

    >>
    >> I thought US "mincemeat" does not have meat the way Welsh Rabbit does
    >> not have rabbit. The name just happens to sound like it.
    >>
    >> Interesting that mincemeat in the UK means ground meat. The would make
    >> a mincemeat pie be in the pastie category.

    >
    >
    >
    > So much misinformation caused by ambiguity in British English
    >
    > There are two different uses of "mincemeat".
    >
    > "Minced meat" - two words - or "mince", is meat that has been ground -
    > the meat is "minced". I can't remember if the etymology is from Latin or
    > French.
    >
    > "Mincemeat" - one word - is a sweet, spiced mix of various fruits,
    > usually including raisins, sultanas, cloves, cinnamon, and ginger. Its
    > name derives from its origin as "cheap meat" - it was originally ground
    > meat, but as meat got more expensive, more and more fruit got
    > substituted until all that remained of the sweet ground meat mixture was
    > the suet, or beef fat.
    >
    > A "mincemeat tart (or pie)" is a sweet, spiced, fruit tart - it is not a
    > savoury "meat pie".
    >
    > Hope this helps!
    >
    >
    >


    Right on! I had forgotten the "minced meat" part. It's all starting to
    run together.

  20. #20
    Ophelia Guest

    Default Re: Dang!


    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4e6109e6$0$2984$[email protected] com...
    > On 9/2/2011 10:35 AM, Doug Freyburger wrote:
    >> Carol S wrote:
    >>>
    >>> George.....my Dad has always loved mincemeat but the kind with beef in
    >>> it.....do you put beef in yours' or just the fruits?

    >>
    >> I thought US "mincemeat" does not have meat the way Welsh Rabbit does
    >> not have rabbit. The name just happens to sound like it.
    >>
    >> Interesting that mincemeat in the UK means ground meat. The would make
    >> a mincemeat pie be in the pastie category.


    > Depends upon which part of Blighty you're from. I think Lady O is
    > originally a Yorkie but lives in Glasgow now, that doesn't make her a
    > Glaswegian though.


    All true and while it might not make me Glasgwegian, since I worked among
    them for over 25 years I suspect some of it might have rubbed off)

    At least according to my Scots friends. I don't think
    > she's Cornish or she would refer to meat pasties.


    Well, not only the Cornish have pasties you know Many people make pasties
    too even though the are indeed called 'Cornish pasties' We can buy them
    in any spmrkt in UK


    Gawd, I'm surprised I
    > even remember what my many Brit friends taught me 28 years ago. Not to
    > mention the Irish I worked with, they really eat strange things.


    lol you have a very good memory George


    --
    http://www.shop.helpforheros.org.uk


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