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Thread: Clostridium botulinum and pounds per pressure

  1. #1
    Green Newb Guest

    Default Clostridium botulinum and pounds per pressure

    In my Presto book on the subject for low acid foods, it says: Clostridium
    is not destroyed at 212 degreesF. For a safe product, low acid foods need
    to be processed at 240 degrees. The book went on to say how many pounds per
    pressure equalled temperatures. I read: 15 Pounds per pressure =
    250degreesF. Yet in my Presto book under chicken - 11 Pounds per pressure.
    Not sure of the double standard, I checked at the National Center for Home
    Food Preservation and Pounds per pressure for chicken was 11 Pounds. Im
    puzzled.

    I processed chicken at 15lbs per pressure yesterday to be on the safe side.
    Shouldn't all the meat processing times be 15lbs per pressure, but perhaps
    less processing time?


  2. #2
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Clostridium botulinum and pounds per pressure

    In article <zu1nm.15140$[email protected]>,
    "Green Newb" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > In my Presto book on the subject for low acid foods, it says: Clostridium
    > is not destroyed at 212 degreesF. For a safe product, low acid foods need
    > to be processed at 240 degrees. The book went on to say how many pounds per
    > pressure equalled temperatures. I read: 15 Pounds per pressure =
    > 250degreesF. Yet in my Presto book under chicken - 11 Pounds per pressure.
    > Not sure of the double standard, I checked at the National Center for Home
    > Food Preservation and Pounds per pressure for chicken was 11 Pounds. Im
    > puzzled.
    >
    > I processed chicken at 15lbs per pressure yesterday to be on the safe side.
    > Shouldn't all the meat processing times be 15lbs per pressure, but perhaps
    > less processing time?



    The difference you're seeing is probably because the weight with
    weighted gauge canners (e.g., my Mirro 12-quart canner) allow 5, 10, or
    15 psi. With a dial gauge, you can get 11 psi; with a weighted gauge
    you have to go up to 15 psi.

    Does that help? Do you have any local (I'm assuming Australian by your
    email address) resources that you can check with? Does the Australian
    government offer any direction or pointers?
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  3. #3
    Green Newb Guest

    Default Re: Clostridium botulinum and pounds per pressure

    Hi Barb,

    I had a look at my dial guage and it says PSI. I have a Presto 23 Quart
    Canner. I never thought of our Government offering that kind of support.
    Somehow I doubt they would. Nobody here cans meat at all as far as I know
    and I think canning in general is almost extinct. Its the reason I ordered
    my canner from America to make sure I got one good enough. I will look
    though.

    Oh I just got it, the answer was staring me in the face all along and you
    helped me sort it. 10 Pounds per pressure = 240 which is the temperature
    that will kill the spore. So recipes call for 11 pounds per pressure I
    guess to be on the safe side. Its amazing that jumping to 15psi only puts
    the temperature up by 10. I don't know why I couldn't see it clearly before
    lol. Thank you

    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <zu1nm.15140$[email protected]>,
    > "Green Newb" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In my Presto book on the subject for low acid foods, it says:
    >> Clostridium
    >> is not destroyed at 212 degreesF. For a safe product, low acid foods
    >> need
    >> to be processed at 240 degrees. The book went on to say how many pounds
    >> per
    >> pressure equalled temperatures. I read: 15 Pounds per pressure =
    >> 250degreesF. Yet in my Presto book under chicken - 11 Pounds per
    >> pressure.
    >> Not sure of the double standard, I checked at the National Center for
    >> Home
    >> Food Preservation and Pounds per pressure for chicken was 11 Pounds. Im
    >> puzzled.
    >>
    >> I processed chicken at 15lbs per pressure yesterday to be on the safe
    >> side.
    >> Shouldn't all the meat processing times be 15lbs per pressure, but
    >> perhaps
    >> less processing time?

    >
    >
    > The difference you're seeing is probably because the weight with
    > weighted gauge canners (e.g., my Mirro 12-quart canner) allow 5, 10, or
    > 15 psi. With a dial gauge, you can get 11 psi; with a weighted gauge
    > you have to go up to 15 psi.
    >
    > Does that help? Do you have any local (I'm assuming Australian by your
    > email address) resources that you can check with? Does the Australian
    > government offer any direction or pointers?
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    > it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    > newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>



  4. #4
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Clostridium botulinum and pounds per pressure

    On Wed, 02 Sep 2009 13:03:15 -0500, Melba's Jammin'
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <zu1nm.15140$[email protected]>,
    > "Green Newb" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In my Presto book on the subject for low acid foods, it says: Clostridium
    >> is not destroyed at 212 degreesF. For a safe product, low acid foods need
    >> to be processed at 240 degrees. The book went on to say how many pounds per
    >> pressure equalled temperatures. I read: 15 Pounds per pressure =
    >> 250degreesF. Yet in my Presto book under chicken - 11 Pounds per pressure.
    >> Not sure of the double standard, I checked at the National Center for Home
    >> Food Preservation and Pounds per pressure for chicken was 11 Pounds. Im
    >> puzzled.
    >>
    >> I processed chicken at 15lbs per pressure yesterday to be on the safe side.
    >> Shouldn't all the meat processing times be 15lbs per pressure, but perhaps
    >> less processing time?

    >
    >
    >The difference you're seeing is probably because the weight with
    >weighted gauge canners (e.g., my Mirro 12-quart canner) allow 5, 10, or
    >15 psi. With a dial gauge, you can get 11 psi; with a weighted gauge
    >you have to go up to 15 psi.
    >
    >Does that help? Do you have any local (I'm assuming Australian by your
    >email address) resources that you can check with? Does the Australian
    >government offer any direction or pointers?


    USDA books gives pressure for both dial and weighted gauges. Dial is
    usually 11psi, weighted is 10psi, unless you are at high altitude.
    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

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