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Thread: Canned carrots

  1. #1
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Canned carrots

    We had a bumper crop of carrots this year, a short row of about five
    feet. Today we pulled, cleaned, cut up, and canned eight pints of nice
    carrots and another three pints have been cooked with rosemary and butter.

    Some how I broke one of the lid handles on the Sears Maid of Honor
    Pressure canner/cooker we bought in 1964. Super glue doesn't hold up
    well at high heats so a repair was not the thing. Went on line and
    looked specifically for parts for that model, found a site that had
    exactly what I wanted plus I ordered a new blow-out plug, steam gauge,
    and lid gasket. Those all need to be replaced periodically so they're on
    their way. The folks who used to test my steam gauges and adjust them
    went out of business after the owner passed away so I reckon I will
    have to buy new ones every couple of years now. Either that or build my
    own testing system.

    Probably will be canning even more carrots next week, we've gotten
    several inches of rain in the last month and every thing is growing again.

    Still painting the house inside and it's going slow, have to move one
    room into others in order to protect everything and get the job done. Of
    course everything goes slowly when you're in your seventies.

    Hope all are staying warm and dry in the cold areas, we're getting temps
    in the mid-seventies F here nearly every day. The fruit trees are
    budding out already, if we get another freeze there goes this years crop.

    George

  2. #2
    pheasant16 Guest

    Default Re: Canned carrots

    George Shirley wrote:

    > Some how I broke one of the lid handles on the Sears Maid of Honor
    > Pressure canner/cooker we bought in 1964. Super glue doesn't hold up
    > well at high heats so a repair was not the thing. Went on line and
    > looked specifically for parts for that model, found a site that had
    > exactly what I wanted plus I ordered a new blow-out plug, steam gauge,
    > and lid gasket. Those all need to be replaced periodically so they're on
    > their way. The folks who used to test my steam gauges and adjust them
    > went out of business after the owner passed away so I reckon I will
    > have to buy new ones every couple of years now. Either that or build my
    > own testing system.


    How about your county extension service for gauge testing? Know they do
    it here in ND. Good find for parts. Was it Dey Appliance?

  3. #3
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Canned carrots

    On 1/22/2012 5:49 AM, pheasant16 wrote:
    > George Shirley wrote:
    >
    >> Some how I broke one of the lid handles on the Sears Maid of Honor
    >> Pressure canner/cooker we bought in 1964. Super glue doesn't hold up
    >> well at high heats so a repair was not the thing. Went on line and
    >> looked specifically for parts for that model, found a site that had
    >> exactly what I wanted plus I ordered a new blow-out plug, steam gauge,
    >> and lid gasket. Those all need to be replaced periodically so they're
    >> on their way. The folks who used to test my steam gauges and adjust
    >> them went out of business after the owner passed away so I reckon I
    >> will have to buy new ones every couple of years now. Either that or
    >> build my own testing system.

    >
    > How about your county extension service for gauge testing? Know they do
    > it here in ND. Good find for parts. Was it Dey Appliance?

    Not here they don't, tried them many years ago, about all they will do
    for you is soil testing, at a higher rate than I can do it myself with a
    kit.

    Nope, here's the URL: http://www.cookingandcanning.net/

    Reasonable prices for outdated parts IMHO. We shall see about their
    delivery timing, just ordered parts yesterday.

    If I sound like I'm not pleased with LSU's extension service it is
    because I am. Have tried to talk to one or more extension agents over
    the last twenty years but they're all "specialists" now. I'm a native
    Texan and had lots of interaction with both ag agents and home agents
    over my lifetime there, always the agents were ready to reach out. May
    be the difference in state salaries and poverty levels.

  4. #4
    The Cook Guest

    Default Re: Canned carrots

    On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 08:20:09 -0600, George Shirley
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 1/22/2012 5:49 AM, pheasant16 wrote:
    >> George Shirley wrote:
    >>
    >>> Some how I broke one of the lid handles on the Sears Maid of Honor
    >>> Pressure canner/cooker we bought in 1964. Super glue doesn't hold up
    >>> well at high heats so a repair was not the thing. Went on line and
    >>> looked specifically for parts for that model, found a site that had
    >>> exactly what I wanted plus I ordered a new blow-out plug, steam gauge,
    >>> and lid gasket. Those all need to be replaced periodically so they're
    >>> on their way. The folks who used to test my steam gauges and adjust
    >>> them went out of business after the owner passed away so I reckon I
    >>> will have to buy new ones every couple of years now. Either that or
    >>> build my own testing system.

    >>
    >> How about your county extension service for gauge testing? Know they do
    >> it here in ND. Good find for parts. Was it Dey Appliance?

    >Not here they don't, tried them many years ago, about all they will do
    >for you is soil testing, at a higher rate than I can do it myself with a
    >kit.
    >
    >Nope, here's the URL: http://www.cookingandcanning.net/
    >
    >Reasonable prices for outdated parts IMHO. We shall see about their
    >delivery timing, just ordered parts yesterday.
    >
    >If I sound like I'm not pleased with LSU's extension service it is
    >because I am. Have tried to talk to one or more extension agents over
    >the last twenty years but they're all "specialists" now. I'm a native
    >Texan and had lots of interaction with both ag agents and home agents
    >over my lifetime there, always the agents were ready to reach out. May
    >be the difference in state salaries and poverty levels.


    The Ag extension agent here retired last spring and I am not sure that
    he has been replaced yet. Will have to check. They were going to
    rely on Master Gardeners "temporarily." They used to come to the
    Farmers' Market and answer questions about what is wrong with my
    plant. Bring in a leaf or two to show him. I'm going to miss him. At
    least they have a pretty good Web site.

    I haven't had my canner checked since I moved here. I had my first
    one (14 qt.) checked in Newport News, VA. After I moved here (NC) I
    found another one , 21 qt. I then got a 9 qt one from a place about
    50 miles from here. It came with the jiggler and I then found out
    that I could replace the safety control valve on my All-American with
    the jiggler like the Mirro. The gauge is still there and I can
    compare the two.

    The only All-American I paid anything like retail for was the 9 qt.
    and it was less that retail. The first one I got came with a Squeezo
    with 3 screens for a total of about $75. The 21 qt. we found at a
    church rummage sale for about $35. The 14 qt. gets used the most.

    Maybe you will have better luck with the extension service in Texas.

    --
    Susan N.

    "Moral indignation is in most cases two percent moral,
    48 percent indignation, and 50 percent envy."
    Vittorio De Sica, Italian movie director (1901-1974)

  5. #5
    pheasant16 Guest

    Default Re: Canned carrots

    George Shirley wrote:
    > On 1/22/2012 5:49 AM, pheasant16 wrote:
    >> George Shirley wrote:
    >>
    >>> Some how I broke one of the lid handles on the Sears Maid of Honor
    >>> Pressure canner/cooker we bought in 1964. Super glue doesn't hold up
    >>> well at high heats so a repair was not the thing. Went on line and
    >>> looked specifically for parts for that model, found a site that had
    >>> exactly what I wanted plus I ordered a new blow-out plug, steam gauge,
    >>> and lid gasket. Those all need to be replaced periodically so they're
    >>> on their way. The folks who used to test my steam gauges and adjust
    >>> them went out of business after the owner passed away so I reckon I
    >>> will have to buy new ones every couple of years now. Either that or
    >>> build my own testing system.

    >>
    >> How about your county extension service for gauge testing? Know they do
    >> it here in ND. Good find for parts. Was it Dey Appliance?

    > Not here they don't, tried them many years ago, about all they will do
    > for you is soil testing, at a higher rate than I can do it myself with a
    > kit.
    >
    > Nope, here's the URL: http://www.cookingandcanning.net/
    >
    > Reasonable prices for outdated parts IMHO. We shall see about their
    > delivery timing, just ordered parts yesterday.
    >
    > If I sound like I'm not pleased with LSU's extension service it is
    > because I am. Have tried to talk to one or more extension agents over
    > the last twenty years but they're all "specialists" now. I'm a native
    > Texan and had lots of interaction with both ag agents and home agents
    > over my lifetime there, always the agents were ready to reach out. May
    > be the difference in state salaries and poverty levels.


    That's sad.

    Being an alum of the same university that sponsors the Extension Service
    and having one retired agent go to our church(never met her face to face
    until she retired and her voice was sooo familiar one day I asked; it
    was!) and another that lets me hunt their farm has made my every stupid
    question more of a chance for some good natured ribbing along with good
    advice. Ah; the joys of living in a rural area have been wonderful over
    the years.

  6. #6
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Canned carrots

    On 1/22/2012 10:22 AM, The Cook wrote:
    > On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 08:20:09 -0600, George Shirley
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 1/22/2012 5:49 AM, pheasant16 wrote:
    >>> George Shirley wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Some how I broke one of the lid handles on the Sears Maid of Honor
    >>>> Pressure canner/cooker we bought in 1964. Super glue doesn't hold up
    >>>> well at high heats so a repair was not the thing. Went on line and
    >>>> looked specifically for parts for that model, found a site that had
    >>>> exactly what I wanted plus I ordered a new blow-out plug, steam gauge,
    >>>> and lid gasket. Those all need to be replaced periodically so they're
    >>>> on their way. The folks who used to test my steam gauges and adjust
    >>>> them went out of business after the owner passed away so I reckon I
    >>>> will have to buy new ones every couple of years now. Either that or
    >>>> build my own testing system.
    >>>
    >>> How about your county extension service for gauge testing? Know they do
    >>> it here in ND. Good find for parts. Was it Dey Appliance?

    >> Not here they don't, tried them many years ago, about all they will do
    >> for you is soil testing, at a higher rate than I can do it myself with a
    >> kit.
    >>
    >> Nope, here's the URL: http://www.cookingandcanning.net/
    >>
    >> Reasonable prices for outdated parts IMHO. We shall see about their
    >> delivery timing, just ordered parts yesterday.
    >>
    >> If I sound like I'm not pleased with LSU's extension service it is
    >> because I am. Have tried to talk to one or more extension agents over
    >> the last twenty years but they're all "specialists" now. I'm a native
    >> Texan and had lots of interaction with both ag agents and home agents
    >> over my lifetime there, always the agents were ready to reach out. May
    >> be the difference in state salaries and poverty levels.

    >
    > The Ag extension agent here retired last spring and I am not sure that
    > he has been replaced yet. Will have to check. They were going to
    > rely on Master Gardeners "temporarily." They used to come to the
    > Farmers' Market and answer questions about what is wrong with my
    > plant. Bring in a leaf or two to show him. I'm going to miss him. At
    > least they have a pretty good Web site.


    I have friends in the Master Gardener group in Louisiana, the ag agents
    use them to answer phones, etc. at their offices over near McNeese
    University. The Master Gardeners generally give you pretty good advice.
    They have a computer program with lots of stuff on it and give those
    answers. I've found I can look things up online by myself and save the
    waiting time. They do have an annual plant sale and lectures at the Ag
    Center here, sometimes we go to see what's new.
    >
    > I haven't had my canner checked since I moved here. I had my first
    > one (14 qt.) checked in Newport News, VA. After I moved here (NC) I
    > found another one , 21 qt. I then got a 9 qt one from a place about
    > 50 miles from here. It came with the jiggler and I then found out
    > that I could replace the safety control valve on my All-American with
    > the jiggler like the Mirro. The gauge is still there and I can
    > compare the two.


    I honestly don't remember what we paid for our Sears canner. Since it
    was in 1964 and I was making about $4 an hour plus shift differential
    and holiday pay, it couldn't have been much. I remember that if we had a
    buck leftover after paying bills back then we thought we were rich. We
    built our first house the year after, 1965, $14,000.00 turnkey for a
    1485 square foot all brick home, stick built and very sturdy. House note
    of $144 a month and $44 a month electric bill for an all electric house.
    I probably should calculate what that would be in 2012 dollars, a lot
    more I'm sure. I loved that house, had a 20x20 pantry, enough space for
    full cabinets, got the sewing machine in there plus the washer and dryer
    and an upright 24 cubic foot and a chest 30 cubic foot freezers too. We
    had a huge garden, 50x90, a barn, and several acres to plant row crops
    on. Not to mention a pond full of fish, also a good swimming hole for we
    and our children. We raised rabbits, chickens, pigs, goats, and had a
    cow and calf a lot of the time. Came as a shock when we moved to Houston
    in 1976 and had to buy all of our food at the supermarket.

    I've got the Maid of Honor torn down to its components and am polishing
    the aluminum inside and out. For the inside I use a paste of cream of
    tartar and water, coat the walls and bottom, let sit 20 minutes and then
    scrub off with a soft scrubber. Does a pretty good job. I just use the
    scrubber on the outside and it works okay too. I would like to have a
    nice stainless steel canner but that can wait until we move. I know a
    thrift store near where we're moving that gets in lots of canning stuff,
    a large retiree area and, as they pass on, their kids sell or give away
    all their "stuff." My son gets us lots of fruit jars there for a nickel
    or a dime each.
    >
    > The only All-American I paid anything like retail for was the 9 qt.
    > and it was less that retail. The first one I got came with a Squeezo
    > with 3 screens for a total of about $75. The 21 qt. we found at a
    > church rummage sale for about $35. The 14 qt. gets used the most.
    >
    > Maybe you will have better luck with the extension service in Texas.
    >

    Always did. When we lived in Texas every county had an ag agent and a
    home extension agent. Miz Anne belonged to a club way back where they
    met once a month and traded recipes and canning tips, the home extension
    agent ran the thing and was very good. Most of the ag agents over there
    used to be close to the big farmers, nowadays they've got some good home
    gardening agents that work with folks like us.

  7. #7
    Nyssa Guest

    Default Re: Canned carrots

    George Shirley wrote:

    > On 1/22/2012 5:49 AM, pheasant16 wrote:
    >> George Shirley wrote:
    >>
    >>> Some how I broke one of the lid handles on the Sears Maid of Honor
    >>> Pressure canner/cooker we bought in 1964. Super glue doesn't hold up
    >>> well at high heats so a repair was not the thing. Went on line and
    >>> looked specifically for parts for that model, found a site that had
    >>> exactly what I wanted plus I ordered a new blow-out plug, steam gauge,
    >>> and lid gasket. Those all need to be replaced periodically so they're
    >>> on their way. The folks who used to test my steam gauges and adjust
    >>> them went out of business after the owner passed away so I reckon I
    >>> will have to buy new ones every couple of years now. Either that or
    >>> build my own testing system.

    >>
    >> How about your county extension service for gauge testing? Know they do
    >> it here in ND. Good find for parts. Was it Dey Appliance?

    > Not here they don't, tried them many years ago, about all they will do
    > for you is soil testing, at a higher rate than I can do it myself with a
    > kit.
    >
    > Nope, here's the URL: http://www.cookingandcanning.net/
    >
    > Reasonable prices for outdated parts IMHO. We shall see about their
    > delivery timing, just ordered parts yesterday.
    >
    > If I sound like I'm not pleased with LSU's extension service it is
    > because I am. Have tried to talk to one or more extension agents over
    > the last twenty years but they're all "specialists" now. I'm a native
    > Texan and had lots of interaction with both ag agents and home agents
    > over my lifetime there, always the agents were ready to reach out. May
    > be the difference in state salaries and poverty levels.


    It can differ within a state too.

    When I lived in Ohio the extension service was excellent, ditto in Michigan.

    Here in Virginia, it's been a crap shoot. The agents I dealt with
    in Virginia Beach were helpful, sent out regular newsletters, held open
    house sessions, and the like, but the ones I've talked to here in Prince
    George County have been pretty much useless.

    In their defense, the first ones I talked to in PG were ag specialists used
    to dealing only with farmers and had to scramble just to get me the
    first and last frost dates for the area. One of them did call me back within
    a day or two and we chatted about the strange weather, problems the
    farmers had been having and all sorts of non-home-gardener type talk.

    When I went to their office, the staff was friendly enough, but at a loss
    about what information they had available or even where to find it. A
    couple of them spent a fair amount of time digging through various file
    cabinets and boxes and finally came up with a small stack of handouts
    that they didn't even know they had. They laughed and said that at least
    now they would have the stuff handy for anyone else who asked. lol

    As for testing gauges or holding training sessions, forget about it. They
    had neither the facilities or the trained staff to help with any of it. About
    the only outreach program they run is the Master Gardener one, which is more
    of a way to get free labor for various county projects than actually being
    much of anything useful, except maybe bragging rights for people who like
    to hang the title of Master Gardener behind their name. Absolutely nothing
    in the home economics or home preserving fields at all.

    It's too bad. A lot of people could benefit from having the resources
    handy to get started in preserving or even help in getting started in home
    gardening. Especially in these dark economic days with ever-soaring food
    prices and overly processed foods.

    Nyssa, who is glad her canner has a weight rather than a gauge



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