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Thread: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?

  1. #1
    {BEV} Guest

    Default CALCIUM CLORIDE ?

    Do you just add it to each jar and them process it ? If so how much per
    QT jar..And can you use it instead of alum to make the 14 day sweet
    pickle,s ( from an old kerr canning book )
    TIA Bev


  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?

    {BEV} wrote:
    > Do you just add it to each jar and them process it?

    Yes.

    If so how much per QT jar..
    It varies by product, you should get a newer preserving book.

    And can you use it instead of alum to make the 14 day sweet
    > pickle,s ( from an old kerr canning book )


    Why make 14 day sweet pickles when you can make them in two or three
    days with either pickling lime or calcium chloride. The last recipe I
    used was from the Ball Complete Book and it took about two and a half
    days and used a lot of calcium chloride. All other pickles I've made
    with it, bread and butter and Dutch luncheon spears, I just put it in
    the jar before I filled it.

    I've never used alum in canning. I worked with it treating potable water
    45 years ago but I wouldn't want it in my food. I think Bob Baron may
    use it, he can answer that question.
    > TIA Bev
    >


  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?

    George Shirley wrote:
    > {BEV} wrote:
    >> Do you just add it to each jar and them process it?

    > Yes.
    >
    > If so how much per QT jar..
    > It varies by product, you should get a newer preserving book.
    >
    > And can you use it instead of alum to make the 14 day sweet
    >> pickle,s ( from an old kerr canning book )

    >
    > Why make 14 day sweet pickles when you can make them in two or three
    > days with either pickling lime or calcium chloride. The last recipe I
    > used was from the Ball Complete Book and it took about two and a half
    > days and used a lot of calcium chloride. All other pickles I've made
    > with it, bread and butter and Dutch luncheon spears, I just put it in
    > the jar before I filled it.
    >
    > I've never used alum in canning. I worked with it treating potable water
    > 45 years ago but I wouldn't want it in my food. I think Bob may
    > use it, he can answer that question.
    >> TIA Bev
    >>



    My mom used to use alum in a few pickles, but mostly we just used grape
    leaves. I use Epsom salts to crisp my cucumbers; I soak them in a weak
    Epsom salts solution (like I was liming them) then drain (no rinse
    necessary) and proceed with the recipe. I know Epsom salts is a
    laxative, but I don't use that much. I haven't tried adding it directly
    to the jars; that should work too. Use it just like you would calcium
    chloride, but it's not as effective as calcium chloride or lime (the
    magnesium crispness will cook out somewhat during processing)

    Try soaking a sliced cucumber in a cup of water with a tsp of Epsom
    salts and see what happens. :-)

    None of the calcium chloride I have is food grade (not even close) so I
    haven't played with that yet.

    Bob

  4. #4
    {BEV} Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?<GEORGE

    I will be making dill pickles , so how much calcium cloride to each qt
    jar ? does it change the prossing time ? I have a fairly new ball blue
    book but nothing about using calcium cloride for pickles
    I make the 14 day sweet pickle because we like them
    BEV


  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?<GEORGE

    {BEV} wrote:
    > I will be making dill pickles , so how much calcium cloride to each qt
    > jar ? does it change the prossing time ? I have a fairly new ball blue
    > book but nothing about using calcium cloride for pickles
    > I make the 14 day sweet pickle because we like them
    > BEV
    >

    I make sweet pickles too Bev, mine just don't take fourteen days. <G>

    See my post that was here just a minute ago, 3/4 teaspoon for pints, 1
    1/2 teaspoons per quart according to Ball. That's what I used and it
    worked. Put the calcium chloride in the jar and then put the pickles and
    liquid in it. Processing time doesn't change at all.

  6. #6
    SDT Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?

    ({BEV}) wrote:

    >Do you just add it to each
    >jar and them process it ?


    Yes.
    >If so how much per QT jar


    For the Ball brand of "Pickle Crisp" which
    is little round lumps of calcium chloride
    that dissolve faster than calcium chloride
    granules (think table salt grains) the label
    says one quarter tsp per quart.

    >..And can you use it instead of alum to make the 14 day sweet
    >pickle,s ( from an old kerr canning book )
    >TIA Bev


    Yes, you can.
    The alum, pickling lime and somethings elses:
    Uhm, you have to soak the stuff in the treated
    water, throw out that water, soak the things
    again to get out the stuff the water was treated
    with---IMO, just skip that effort and pickle a
    paper towel-same taste, less crispy.
    - Also, that takes days.
    -
    Just skip those steps and put the CaCl into the
    jars. You'll get a tastier product that was easier
    to make.

    I don't recall why I have the idea that it will take
    about a week or two for the pickle crisp / CaCl
    to crisp up the ingredients, and I've no idea why
    I'd forget that it does crisp up meat.
    SDT

  7. #7
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?

    On 12/24/2010 10:02 PM, SDT wrote:
    > ({BEV}) wrote:
    >
    >> Do you just add it to each
    >> jar and them process it ?

    >
    > Yes.
    >> If so how much per QT jar

    >
    > For the Ball brand of "Pickle Crisp" which
    > is little round lumps of calcium chloride
    > that dissolve faster than calcium chloride
    > granules (think table salt grains) the label
    > says one quarter tsp per quart.
    >
    >> ..And can you use it instead of alum to make the 14 day sweet
    >> pickle,s ( from an old kerr canning book )
    >> TIA Bev

    >
    > Yes, you can.
    > The alum, pickling lime and somethings elses:
    > Uhm, you have to soak the stuff in the treated
    > water, throw out that water, soak the things
    > again to get out the stuff the water was treated
    > with---IMO, just skip that effort and pickle a
    > paper towel-same taste, less crispy.
    > - Also, that takes days.
    > -
    > Just skip those steps and put the CaCl into the
    > jars. You'll get a tastier product that was easier
    > to make.
    >
    > I don't recall why I have the idea that it will take
    > about a week or two for the pickle crisp / CaCl
    > to crisp up the ingredients, and I've no idea why
    > I'd forget that it does crisp up meat.
    > SDT


    Probably because that is what Ball says on the Pickle Crisp directions.
    I tried opening a pint jar early once and they weren't crisp. Haven't
    made that mistake since. Never tried to crisp up meat as I don't can
    meat anyway.

  8. #8
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?

    On 1/2/2011 10:14 AM, kerongdem wrote:
    > what calcium cloride ? i think it has many in shrimp and crab
    >
    >

    I think you are confusing calcium and calcium chloride, calcium chloride
    is a salt of calcium, whereas calcium is found in bones of mammals and
    shells of invertebrates and in other creatures also.

    Calcium chloride used in food preserving is used as a firming agent in
    making pickles, also used often in cooking certain dishes to keep the
    flesh in it, generally sea creatures, firm.

    I can vouch for the efficacy of calcium chloride in pickles but have
    never used it for cooking a sea food dish. Does that help?

  9. #9
    SDT Guest

    Default Re: CALCIUM CLORIDE ?


    >> I don't recall why I have the idea that it will take
    >> about a week or two for the pickle crisp / CaCl
    >> to crisp up the ingredients, and I've no idea why
    >> I'd forget that it does crisp up meat.
    >> SDT

    >
    >Probably because that is what Ball says on the Pickle Crisp directions.
    >I tried opening a pint jar early once and they weren't crisp. Haven't
    >made that mistake since. Never tried to crisp up meat as I don't can
    >meat anyway.


    /Singing and dancing/ :
    If I only had a brain.

    Wow, I'd so miss my skeleton.
    Sorry.
    Shawn

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