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Thread: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn

  1. #1
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn


    Well, after discovering that our electric wire was out and that the #@*%
    deer had eaten ALL of my remaining bell peppers, I pulled on the old
    Wellies and traipsed out into the remains of the muddied upper garden.
    Spotting three lovely green cucumbers and several zucchinis, I stopped
    to utter a thank-you to the curcurbitae god. We were really blessed
    with an amazing crop of zucchinis and cukes this year. I credit the row
    covers with giving them all a fabulous, protected start.

    Mr. Bill informs me that there's likely another 5-7# of wax beans in the
    lower garden plus some more Providers. I'll freeze up the wax beans but
    there's no way I'll find room for the Providers. The snow peas are
    ready to pick just as the weather here chills a bit more decisively.
    Still no freeze but, surely, it's only a matter of days. My parsley...
    what the deer haven't ravaged yet... seems to thrive in these cooler
    temperatures. It does well into the mid-twenties but I'm thinking about
    covering it.

    A pair of wrens has found the bird house in the garage that my daughter
    made. But I've seen a Phoebe out there too. This should be interesting
    as wrens have been wintering there for 4 or 5 years now. Mr. Bill lets
    them out when he leaves in the morning... usually at dawn. If we forget
    them, like on a weekend, they sing incredibly loud until we open the
    door to let them out. It's amazing how much volume that tiny bird can
    belt out.

    My other recent wildlife experiences have been far less pleasant. A
    couple weeks ago, I found a copperhead on the patio. He was very rude,
    vibrating his tail menacingly at me and rearing his head up as if to
    bite. Scared the daylights out of my as I nearly stepped on him on my
    way to hang out the wash. I opened a large paper grocery bag and gently
    nudged him in there with one of my long clothes poles and then, using
    two poles like giant chopsticks, one under each arm, I picked up the bag
    and walked it down to the woods where I tipped the bag over and ran back
    up the hill. Ugh!

    This morning it was a gigantic spider (like a small tarantula!!) in the
    basement. I trapped and threw him outside. Ick!

    Other than that, it's been a thoroughly great season in the garden for
    growing and preserving. We're already drooling over some seed
    catalogues planning for next year. Just got an acknowledgement from
    Miller for a soon-to-shop standard Montmorency, some asparagus, another
    blueberry, Canadice, Reliance and Concord grapes, and a few more Latham
    raspberries. Mr. Bill will be happy as a clam.

    Isabella
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  2. #2
    Brian Mailman Guest

    Default Re: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn

    Isabella Woodhouse wrote:

    > My other recent wildlife experiences have been far less pleasant. A
    > couple weeks ago, I found a copperhead on the patio. He was very rude,
    > vibrating his tail menacingly at me and rearing his head up as if to
    > bite.


    In copperhead culture, though, that's considered to be company manners.
    Not to simply strike first, but provide a "you're in the zone" warning
    with the option to continue forward or back away.

    B/

  3. #3
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Re: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Brian Mailman <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Isabella Woodhouse wrote:
    >
    > > My other recent wildlife experiences have been far less pleasant. A
    > > couple weeks ago, I found a copperhead on the patio. He was very rude,
    > > vibrating his tail menacingly at me and rearing his head up as if to
    > > bite.

    >
    > In copperhead culture, though, that's considered to be company manners.
    > Not to simply strike first, but provide a "you're in the zone" warning
    > with the option to continue forward or back away.


    How true. With all the falling leaves, they can easily hide so the
    vibrating tail at least provides a visual clue. I hope he found a
    better home out in the woods. I'd rather not be finding them around the
    house.
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  4. #4
    Ted Mittelstaedt Guest

    Default Re: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn


    "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Brian Mailman <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Isabella Woodhouse wrote:
    > >
    > > > My other recent wildlife experiences have been far less pleasant. A
    > > > couple weeks ago, I found a copperhead on the patio. He was very

    rude,
    > > > vibrating his tail menacingly at me and rearing his head up as if to
    > > > bite.

    > >
    > > In copperhead culture, though, that's considered to be company manners.
    > > Not to simply strike first, but provide a "you're in the zone" warning
    > > with the option to continue forward or back away.

    >
    > How true. With all the falling leaves, they can easily hide so the
    > vibrating tail at least provides a visual clue. I hope he found a
    > better home out in the woods. I'd rather not be finding them around the
    > house.


    Although, they keep the mice down.

    Ted



  5. #5
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn

    Ted Mittelstaedt wrote:
    > "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> In article <[email protected]>,
    >> Brian Mailman <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Isabella Woodhouse wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> My other recent wildlife experiences have been far less pleasant. A
    >>>> couple weeks ago, I found a copperhead on the patio. He was very

    > rude,
    >>>> vibrating his tail menacingly at me and rearing his head up as if to
    >>>> bite.
    >>> In copperhead culture, though, that's considered to be company manners.
    >>> Not to simply strike first, but provide a "you're in the zone" warning
    >>> with the option to continue forward or back away.

    >> How true. With all the falling leaves, they can easily hide so the
    >> vibrating tail at least provides a visual clue. I hope he found a
    >> better home out in the woods. I'd rather not be finding them around the
    >> house.

    >
    > Although, they keep the mice down.
    >
    > Ted
    >
    >

    Copperheads? I've never seen a copperhead in Texas or Louisiana that was
    big enough to eat a mouse, maybe a baby one. Biggest one I've ever seen
    was about 20 inches long and maybe an inch in diameter at the biggest
    part of its body. Are you telling me there are giant copperheads out
    there? <shiver>

  6. #6
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Re: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Ted Mittelstaedt" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Brian Mailman <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Isabella Woodhouse wrote:
    > > >
    > > > > My other recent wildlife experiences have been far less pleasant. A
    > > > > couple weeks ago, I found a copperhead on the patio. He was very

    > rude,
    > > > > vibrating his tail menacingly at me and rearing his head up as if to
    > > > > bite.
    > > >
    > > > In copperhead culture, though, that's considered to be company manners.
    > > > Not to simply strike first, but provide a "you're in the zone" warning
    > > > with the option to continue forward or back away.

    > >
    > > How true. With all the falling leaves, they can easily hide so the
    > > vibrating tail at least provides a visual clue. I hope he found a
    > > better home out in the woods. I'd rather not be finding them around the
    > > house.

    >
    > Although, they keep the mice down.


    We have plenty of other non-venomous snakes, especially rat snakes, for
    that purpose.
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  7. #7
    Isabella Woodhouse Guest

    Default Re: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn

    In article <uYhNk.53588$[email protected]>,
    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ted Mittelstaedt wrote:
    > > "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]..
    > >> In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> Brian Mailman <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> In copperhead culture, though, that's considered to be company
    > >>> manners. Not to simply strike first, but provide a "you're in
    > >>> the zone" warning with the option to continue forward or back
    > >>> away.


    > >> How true. With all the falling leaves, they can easily hide so
    > >> the vibrating tail at least provides a visual clue. I hope he
    > >> found a better home out in the woods. I'd rather not be finding
    > >> them around the house.

    > >
    > > Although, they keep the mice down.
    > >

    > Copperheads? I've never seen a copperhead in Texas or Louisiana that
    > was big enough to eat a mouse, maybe a baby one. Biggest one I've
    > ever seen was about 20 inches long and maybe an inch in diameter at
    > the biggest part of its body. Are you telling me there are giant
    > copperheads out there? <shiver>


    The one on my patio was between 18 and 24" and no bigger than an inch
    in diameter. Others I've seen here were about the same size or a
    little smaller. Despite their size, they can make you really sick---
    though not anywhere near as sick as Timber Rattlers.

    Isabella
    --
    "I will show you fear in a handful of dust"
    -T.S. Eliot

  8. #8
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Bye-Bye... <sniff>... Cucumbers, Hello Autumn

    Isabella Woodhouse wrote:
    > In article <uYhNk.53588$[email protected]>,
    > George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Ted Mittelstaedt wrote:
    >>> "Isabella Woodhouse" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> news:[email protected]..
    >>>> In article <[email protected]>,
    >>>> Brian Mailman <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> In copperhead culture, though, that's considered to be company
    >>>>> manners. Not to simply strike first, but provide a "you're in
    >>>>> the zone" warning with the option to continue forward or back
    >>>>> away.

    >
    >>>> How true. With all the falling leaves, they can easily hide so
    >>>> the vibrating tail at least provides a visual clue. I hope he
    >>>> found a better home out in the woods. I'd rather not be finding
    >>>> them around the house.
    >>> Although, they keep the mice down.
    >>>

    >> Copperheads? I've never seen a copperhead in Texas or Louisiana that
    >> was big enough to eat a mouse, maybe a baby one. Biggest one I've
    >> ever seen was about 20 inches long and maybe an inch in diameter at
    >> the biggest part of its body. Are you telling me there are giant
    >> copperheads out there? <shiver>

    >
    > The one on my patio was between 18 and 24" and no bigger than an inch
    > in diameter. Others I've seen here were about the same size or a
    > little smaller. Despite their size, they can make you really sick---
    > though not anywhere near as sick as Timber Rattlers.
    >
    > Isabella

    Tell me about them there Timber Rattlers. Got nearly scared to death
    once upon a time. Going out to my deer stand before daylight, walking
    along a game trail quietly and jumped a covey of quail. If you've ever
    heard ten or fifteen quail jump into the air all at once, out of a brush
    patch, you will remember that it sounds like the biggest rattler in the
    world shaking his tail. I nearly had a heart attack that morning and I
    was only in my twenties at the time.

    Running around barefoot in the yard when I was about eleven years old I
    got bitten by a ground rattler I stepped on. Made me sick for a couple
    of days, they're so tiny they have very little poison, the rattler, of
    course, died. I stomped it to death doing the "snake dance."

    Was raised in East Texas and we had all five of the five poisonous
    snakes found in the US on our property. Had to be careful when I was a
    kid and make my own kids aware of the dangers when they came along
    starting in 1961. Sheesh! Hard to realize both my babies are bumping fifty.

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