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Thread: Bruschetta

  1. #1
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Bruschetta

    I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine. I
    don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than what's
    in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute for the wine
    and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also calls for white wine
    vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and leave out the wine?

    --
    -Marilyn



  2. #2
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    Marilyn wrote:
    > I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    > Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine. I
    > don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than what's
    > in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute for the wine
    > and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also calls for white wine
    > vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and leave out the wine?
    >

    Marilyn: When alcoholic beverages are used in cooking the alcohol cooks
    out to atmosphere in just a few moments, leaving behind the flavor of
    the beverage and no alcohol.

    I would suspect that doubling the vinegar would be a bit more sour than
    you want. HTH

  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    George Shirley wrote:
    > Marilyn wrote:
    >> I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the
    >> Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white
    >> wine. I don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking,
    >> other than what's in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I
    >> substitute for the wine and have the recipe still okay for
    >> preserving? It also calls for white wine vinegar. Could I just use
    >> the vinegar for both and leave out the wine?
    >>

    > Marilyn: When alcoholic beverages are used in cooking the alcohol cooks
    > out to atmosphere in just a few moments, leaving behind the flavor of
    > the beverage and no alcohol.


    Actually, it doesn't. If you cook it a long time, you can get rid of
    most of the alcohol. A good rule of thumb (and you know how inaccurate
    those can be) is half the alcohol cooks away.

    > I would suspect that doubling the vinegar would be a bit more sour than
    > you want. HTH



    I would probably use cheap "industrial grade" basalmic vinegar. Maybe
    for both the wine and the vinegar. HTH

    Bob



  4. #4
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    George Shirley wrote:

    > Marilyn: When alcoholic beverages are used in cooking the alcohol cooks
    > out to atmosphere in just a few moments, leaving behind the flavor of
    > the beverage and no alcohol.


    Only if you want to remove the taste of alchohol. People who are alergic,
    addicted or taking medicine that reacts to alcohol (including cardiac/
    hypertension) or are relgiously opposed to the consumption of alcohol,
    do not get enough out that way.

    If you just object to the taste, use the wine vinegar. It won't taste exactly
    the same, but you may like it anyway.

    Geoff.

    --
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel [email protected] N3OWJ/4X1GM

  5. #5
    Dave Balderstone Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    In article <h8gslf$8ip$[email protected]>, Marilyn
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    > Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine. I
    > don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than what's
    > in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute for the wine
    > and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also calls for white wine
    > vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and leave out the wine?


    Use white grape juice instead of the wine. Don't double the vinegar,
    you almost certainly will hate the resulting flavour.

  6. #6
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    Dave Balderstone wrote:

    > Use white grape juice instead of the wine. Don't double the vinegar,
    > you almost certainly will hate the resulting flavour.


    I disagree.

    White grape juice may be a problem. Someone suggested on another list I am
    on to use it instead of sugar as a "natural" substitute. She had specified
    Welch's so I went to their web site and looked it up. It had half again more
    sugar than Coca-Cola.

    I would rather have it balanced, not sour tasting, but given a choice between
    too sour and too sweet, I'd go for too sour.

    Geoff.
    --
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel [email protected] N3OWJ/4X1GM

  7. #7
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected] ...
    > Marilyn wrote:
    >> I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    >> Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine.
    >> I don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than
    >> what's in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute for
    >> the wine and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also calls
    >> for white wine vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and leave
    >> out the wine?
    >>

    > Marilyn: When alcoholic beverages are used in cooking the alcohol cooks
    > out to atmosphere in just a few moments, leaving behind the flavor of the
    > beverage and no alcohol.
    >
    > I would suspect that doubling the vinegar would be a bit more sour than
    > you want. HTH




    You can tell me that all I want, but I still don't want to use the alcohol
    in my cooking.

    --
    -Marilyn



  8. #8
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > George Shirley wrote:
    >> Marilyn wrote:
    >>> I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    >>> Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine.
    >>> I don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than
    >>> what's in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute
    >>> for the wine and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also
    >>> calls for white wine vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and
    >>> leave out the wine?
    >>>

    >> Marilyn: When alcoholic beverages are used in cooking the alcohol cooks
    >> out to atmosphere in just a few moments, leaving behind the flavor of the
    >> beverage and no alcohol.

    >
    > Actually, it doesn't. If you cook it a long time, you can get rid of most
    > of the alcohol. A good rule of thumb (and you know how inaccurate those
    > can be) is half the alcohol cooks away.
    >
    >> I would suspect that doubling the vinegar would be a bit more sour than
    >> you want. HTH

    >
    >
    > I would probably use cheap "industrial grade" basalmic vinegar. Maybe for
    > both the wine and the vinegar. HTH
    >
    > Bob
    >


    I have balsamic vinegar. I get the kind they sell at Costco.



    --
    -Marilyn



  9. #9
    RegForte Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    Marilyn wrote:

    > I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    > Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine. I
    > don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than what's
    > in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute for the wine
    > and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also calls for white wine
    > vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and leave out the wine?
    >


    Your best best would be to use dealcoholized wine

    http://www.carljungwines.com

  10. #10
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    "Geoffrey S. Mendelson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > George Shirley wrote:
    >
    >> Marilyn: When alcoholic beverages are used in cooking the alcohol cooks
    >> out to atmosphere in just a few moments, leaving behind the flavor of
    >> the beverage and no alcohol.

    >
    > Only if you want to remove the taste of alchohol. People who are alergic,
    > addicted or taking medicine that reacts to alcohol (including cardiac/
    > hypertension) or are relgiously opposed to the consumption of alcohol,
    > do not get enough out that way.
    >
    > If you just object to the taste, use the wine vinegar. It won't taste
    > exactly
    > the same, but you may like it anyway.
    >
    > Geoff.
    >
    > --
    > Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel [email protected] N3OWJ/4X1GM




    That's what I'm concerned about. It's sort of like telling a vegan, well,
    there's only a little meat there so it will be okay. It's not okay, though,
    if someone is living by a certain code and does not wish to have the alcohol
    in there at all.

    --
    -Marilyn



  11. #11
    Marilyn Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    "Dave Balderstone" <dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca> wrote in message
    news:120920091423185734%dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderst one.ca...
    > In article <h8gslf$8ip$[email protected]>, Marilyn
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    >> Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine.
    >> I
    >> don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than
    >> what's
    >> in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute for the
    >> wine
    >> and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also calls for white
    >> wine
    >> vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and leave out the wine?

    >
    > Use white grape juice instead of the wine. Don't double the vinegar,
    > you almost certainly will hate the resulting flavour.



    Oh, good. I'll get some white grape juice then and try it that way.

    --
    -Marilyn



  12. #12
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson Guest

  13. #13
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    Marilyn wrote:
    > "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> George Shirley wrote:
    >>> Marilyn wrote:
    >>>> I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    >>>> Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine.
    >>>> I don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than
    >>>> what's in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute
    >>>> for the wine and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also
    >>>> calls for white wine vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and
    >>>> leave out the wine?
    >>>>
    >>> Marilyn: When alcoholic beverages are used in cooking the alcohol cooks
    >>> out to atmosphere in just a few moments, leaving behind the flavor of the
    >>> beverage and no alcohol.

    >> Actually, it doesn't. If you cook it a long time, you can get rid of most
    >> of the alcohol. A good rule of thumb (and you know how inaccurate those
    >> can be) is half the alcohol cooks away.
    >>
    >>> I would suspect that doubling the vinegar would be a bit more sour than
    >>> you want. HTH

    >>
    >> I would probably use cheap "industrial grade" basalmic vinegar. Maybe for
    >> both the wine and the vinegar. HTH
    >>
    >> Bob
    >>

    >
    > I have balsamic vinegar. I get the kind they sell at Costco.
    >



    That's the stuff. (I didn't buy mine at Costco, but it was a 750 ml or
    larger bottle for just couple of dollars.)

    Or you can just leave out the wine completely and add a little water at
    the end if it's too thick.

    Bob


  14. #14
    RegForte Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:

    > RegForte wrote:
    >
    >>Your best best would be to use dealcoholized wine
    >>
    >>http://www.carljungwines.com

    >
    >
    > In red letters on the top and bottom of the page:
    >
    > "All of our wines contain .2% Alcohol"
    >
    > Geoff.
    >


    Clearly. But, the OP did say a non-zero amount of alcohol is
    acceptable to her. Vanilla extract contains alcohol,
    etc, and she's OK with that. So it's a question of amount.

  15. #15
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    Marilyn wrote:
    > That's what I'm concerned about. It's sort of like telling a vegan, well,
    > there's only a little meat there so it will be okay. It's not okay, though,
    > if someone is living by a certain code and does not wish to have the alcohol
    > in there at all.


    If that's the case, then you can avoid it in vanilla by using a whole bean.

    You scrape the seeds out, and use them. You can also blend the pod in some
    water, but it gives it a "woody" texture.

    Real vanilla beans are relatively cheap if you buy them from a restaurant
    supply, I get mine in packs of 25.

    I got this from Gordon Ramsay in his dessert cookbook and one of his "how to"
    videos. The book is better for you if you object to his language in the shows.
    :-)

    BTW, IMHO you should not overdo bruschetta. Toasted bread with simple toppings
    is good, things that are too complex get muddled. If you can't identify
    everything in the topping, you have too many things. :-)



    Geoff.

    --
    Geoffrey S. Mendelson, Jerusalem, Israel [email protected] N3OWJ/4X1GM

  16. #16
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
    > RegForte wrote:
    >> Your best best would be to use dealcoholized wine
    >>
    >> http://www.carljungwines.com

    >
    > In red letters on the top and bottom of the page:
    >
    > "All of our wines contain .2% Alcohol"
    >
    > Geoff.



    I wouldn't be surprised if *bread* contains .2% alcohol. It is almost
    impossible to get rid of the last little bit if there's any water
    present. Using 1/2 cup of .2% dealcoholized wine in a recipe
    contributes about the same amount of ethanol as... (getting out
    calculator) 1/8 tsp of vanilla extract or 1/16 tsp of lemon extract.
    (would be a lot easier to calculate in metric grumblegrumble)

    Nothing wrong with trying to eliminate that, just making sure it's an
    informed decision. :-)

    Bob


  17. #17
    Dave Balderstone Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    In article <[email protected]>, zxcvbob
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Geoffrey S. Mendelson wrote:
    > > RegForte wrote:
    > >> Your best best would be to use dealcoholized wine
    > >>
    > >> http://www.carljungwines.com

    > >
    > > In red letters on the top and bottom of the page:
    > >
    > > "All of our wines contain .2% Alcohol"
    > >
    > > Geoff.

    >
    >
    > I wouldn't be surprised if *bread* contains .2% alcohol. It is almost
    > impossible to get rid of the last little bit if there's any water
    > present. Using 1/2 cup of .2% dealcoholized wine in a recipe
    > contributes about the same amount of ethanol as... (getting out
    > calculator) 1/8 tsp of vanilla extract or 1/16 tsp of lemon extract.
    > (would be a lot easier to calculate in metric grumblegrumble)
    >
    > Nothing wrong with trying to eliminate that, just making sure it's an
    > informed decision. :-)


    If I recall my high school bology correctly, ethyl alcohol is produced
    in the human body as part of cellular metabolism.

  18. #18
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    In article <h8h5ss$b7g$[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Dave Balderstone" <dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderstone.ca> wrote in message
    > news:120920091423185734%dave@N_O_T_T_H_I_Sbalderst one.ca...
    > > In article <h8gslf$8ip$[email protected]>, Marilyn
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I am looking at the recipe for "Bruschetta in a Jar" that's in the Ball
    > >> Complete Book of Home Preserving. The recipe calls for dry white wine.
    > >> I
    > >> don't drink and I don't like to use alcohol in my cooking, other than
    > >> what's
    > >> in vanilla extract, etc. My question is what can I substitute for the
    > >> wine
    > >> and have the recipe still okay for preserving? It also calls for white
    > >> wine
    > >> vinegar. Could I just use the vinegar for both and leave out the wine?

    > >
    > > Use white grape juice instead of the wine. Don't double the vinegar,
    > > you almost certainly will hate the resulting flavour.

    >
    >
    > Oh, good. I'll get some white grape juice then and try it that way.


    Don't expect the same taste, though. White grape juice is often used in
    no-sugar-added jams as the sweetener and in my head it's going to add a
    sweeter taste than dry white wine would. Maybe I'm wrong.
    -B
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  19. #19
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    In article <[email protected]>,
    "Geoffrey S. Mendelson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Dave Balderstone wrote:
    >
    > > Use white grape juice instead of the wine. Don't double the vinegar,
    > > you almost certainly will hate the resulting flavour.

    >
    > I disagree.
    >
    > White grape juice may be a problem. Someone suggested on another list I am
    > on to use it instead of sugar as a "natural" substitute. She had specified
    > Welch's so I went to their web site and looked it up. It had half again more
    > sugar than Coca-Cola.
    >
    > I would rather have it balanced, not sour tasting, but given a choice between
    > too sour and too sweet, I'd go for too sour.
    >
    > Geoff.


    Hear, hear.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

  20. #20
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Bruschetta

    In article <h8h5ru$b79$[email protected]>,
    "Marilyn" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > That's what I'm concerned about. It's sort of like telling a vegan, well,
    > there's only a little meat there so it will be okay. It's not okay, though,
    > if someone is living by a certain code and does not wish to have the alcohol
    > in there at all.


    Understood.
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - Yes, I Can! blog - check
    it out. And check this, too: <http://www.kare11.com/news/
    newsatfour/newsatfour_article.aspx?storyid=823232&catid=323>

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