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Thread: Bread prices redux

  1. #1
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Bread prices redux

    Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
    Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
    That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
    bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
    house on the main drag in our town.

  2. #2
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
    > Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    > loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
    > Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
    > That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
    > bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
    > house on the main drag in our town.



    I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
    Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
    muffins.

    Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
    Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
    the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
    space.

    gloria p

  3. #3
    zxcvbob Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    George Shirley wrote:
    > Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    > loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
    > Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
    > That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
    > bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
    > house on the main drag in our town.



    The Hostess thrift store here charges almost full price for used bread.
    They used to have good deals before Interstate Bakeries went bankrupt
    in 2004. When they came back they jacked the prices way up at the
    outlet stores. I can get better fresh bread cheaper at Cub Foods and
    Aldi. (both are cheaper than Walmart except for the really awful squishy
    white bread.)

    I can bake a 2 pound loaf of sourdough bread for just a few cents. At
    least last time I bought a 25# bag of flour at Sam's it didn't cost
    hardly anything -- but that was over a year ago.

    -Bob

  4. #4
    Mimi Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    I bake as much of my own bread as possible--try to do Challah every
    Friday, if I am not working, volunteering or traveling--and then
    sometimes I will make it ahead of time so I can take it with. I
    absolutely, love, adore, crave rye bread but have never really been
    able to make a good loaf myself so, I buy it at the outlet store,
    $1.59 a loaf. That's about half the price it is at the grocery store.
    I've done Spelt with some success, just haven't made it for a while.

  5. #5
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    outstanding, we often wait for a sale if we are buying bread then freeze, if
    its that close i would probably just get it when i wanted it, if you like
    bread pudding these stores often have wonderful things for that as well, Lee
    "George Shirley" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:4e838192$0$20048$[email protected] .com...
    > Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    > loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
    > Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus. That's
    > cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying bread
    > from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the house on the
    > main drag in our town.




  6. #6
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
    regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up as
    we both love english muffins, Lee
    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j6098v$ouv$[email protected]..
    > On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
    >> Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    >> loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
    >> Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
    >> That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
    >> bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
    >> house on the main drag in our town.

    >
    >
    > I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
    > Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
    > muffins.
    >
    > Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
    > Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
    > the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
    > space.
    >
    > gloria p




  7. #7
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
    > regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up as
    > we both love english muffins, Lee
    > "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:j6098v$ouv$[email protected]..
    >> On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
    >>> Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    >>> loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
    >>> Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
    >>> That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
    >>> bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
    >>> house on the main drag in our town.

    >>
    >>
    >> I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
    >> Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
    >> muffins.
    >>
    >> Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
    >> Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
    >> the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
    >> space.
    >>
    >> gloria p


    Hmmm...

    A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?

    Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
    in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
    for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
    cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.

    --
    Nad

  8. #8
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    the thing i appreciate about this group is that the majority of the regular
    participants are supportive of other participants, regardless of where on
    the preserving bell curve they land, from beginner, to expert, jams, breads,
    bulk cooking all count, and are all lauded as valid to saving money,
    perfecting a craft and generally eating better,

    Lee,
    "Nad" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:j61las$6jq$[email protected]..
    > "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
    >> regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up
    >> as
    >> we both love english muffins, Lee
    >> "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:j6098v$ouv$[email protected]..
    >>> On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
    >>>> Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    >>>> loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's
    >>>> Own
    >>>> Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
    >>>> That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm
    >>>> buying
    >>>> bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
    >>>> house on the main drag in our town.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
    >>> Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
    >>> muffins.
    >>>
    >>> Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
    >>> Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
    >>> the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
    >>> space.
    >>>
    >>> gloria p

    >
    > Hmmm...
    >
    > A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    > Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?
    >
    > Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
    > in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
    > for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
    > cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.
    >
    > --
    > Nad




  9. #9
    gloria.p Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    On 9/29/2011 5:38 AM, Nad wrote:

    > A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    > Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?
    >


    I do make a couple of kinds of bread on occasion but haven't gotten into
    making sandwich bread regularly. Convenience is the word.

    > Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
    > in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
    > for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
    > cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.
    >


    Why not just plow up your back yard and grown your own wheat? As Lee
    said, there's a continuum and we all find our own place on the curve.

    gloria p

  10. #10
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    "gloria.p" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Why not just plow up your back yard and grown your own wheat? As Lee
    > said, there's a continuum and we all find our own place on the curve.
    >
    > gloria p


    Wheat does not grow very well in my state or my soil is not good enough for
    wheat. Especially the varieties that make great bread. I have tried, but
    the varieties of wheat that does grow well here is ok for animal feed. The
    local grain store does sell human food grade wheat from different areas of
    the country. The wheat berries are sold in fifty pound containers. It cost
    less to grind your own flour and for convenience I use an Automatic Bread
    Machine. I make few trips to the market and I save on gas.

    I have a small personal hobby farm of twenty acres. Fresh eggs from the hen
    house, milk from my own dairy cow and huge vegetable garden. This is why I
    have an interest in food preserving. This is my place on the curve.

    --
    Nad

  11. #11
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    On 9/29/2011 6:38 AM, Nad wrote:
    > "Storrmmee"<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> our thomasas go on sale for a dollar a package evry so often at meijer,
    >> regular are about three dollars, when we had freezer space we stocked up as
    >> we both love english muffins, Lee
    >> "gloria.p"<[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:j6098v$ouv$[email protected]..
    >>> On 9/28/2011 2:15 PM, George Shirley wrote:
    >>>> Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39 a
    >>>> loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's Own
    >>>> Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a bonus.
    >>>> That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where I'm buying
    >>>> bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks from the
    >>>> house on the main drag in our town.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> I just Googled and we have an Orowheat outlet about 6 miles away.
    >>> Good thought. Their bread is not bad at all and I love their English
    >>> muffins.
    >>>
    >>> Funny, when they first started making them they cost much less than
    >>> Thomas's. Now the latter is on sale most of the time for 2/$5 and
    >>> the Orowheat are $3.49 a pkg. Probably worth the trip if I have freezer
    >>> space.
    >>>
    >>> gloria p

    >
    > Hmmm...
    >
    > A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    > Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?
    >
    > Why not just buy a fifty pound container of wheat berries? Wheat berries
    > in containers will last for YEARS. Get a grinder and over time it will pay
    > for itself and Really have some of the best tasting bread ever at a lower
    > cost than those stale past due date bread discount stores.
    >

    And I do make my own bread on occasion. There are more important things
    to do around here than to continuously make bread. Grind my own wheat,
    nope, see previous sentence. I preserve what I want to eat that we like
    and the descendants like. Bread is to cheap to spend time making for the
    little bit that we eat. To each his own.

    Oh yeah, freezing things you buy is also food preserving. Like meat,
    veggies, bread, desserts etc.

  12. #12
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    On 9/29/2011 2:39 PM, Nad wrote:
    > "gloria.p"<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Why not just plow up your back yard and grown your own wheat? As Lee
    >> said, there's a continuum and we all find our own place on the curve.
    >>
    >> gloria p

    >
    > Wheat does not grow very well in my state or my soil is not good enough for
    > wheat. Especially the varieties that make great bread. I have tried, but
    > the varieties of wheat that does grow well here is ok for animal feed. The
    > local grain store does sell human food grade wheat from different areas of
    > the country. The wheat berries are sold in fifty pound containers. It cost
    > less to grind your own flour and for convenience I use an Automatic Bread
    > Machine. I make few trips to the market and I save on gas.
    >
    > I have a small personal hobby farm of twenty acres. Fresh eggs from the hen
    > house, milk from my own dairy cow and huge vegetable garden. This is why I
    > have an interest in food preserving. This is my place on the curve.
    >

    Our hobby farm is 75 feet wide and 150 feet long, I think many of the
    folks on this newsgroup have even smaller places. We once lived for
    years on ten acres and had another ten acres to grow things on. At age
    72 that ain't gonna happen again. Each of us should enjoy their own
    place on the curve as others have said.

  13. #13
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    On 9/28/2011 6:42 PM, zxcvbob wrote:
    > George Shirley wrote:
    >> Went to the used bread store this morning, same bread that was #$3.39
    >> a loaf at Kroger was $1.39 a loaf there. Bought two loaves of Nature's
    >> Own Honey Seven Grain and then they gave me two more loaves as a
    >> bonus. That's cut the price down to 69.5 cents per loaf. Guess where
    >> I'm buying bread from now on and the place is only about three blocks
    >> from the house on the main drag in our town.

    >
    >
    > The Hostess thrift store here charges almost full price for used bread.
    > They used to have good deals before Interstate Bakeries went bankrupt in
    > 2004. When they came back they jacked the prices way up at the outlet
    > stores. I can get better fresh bread cheaper at Cub Foods and Aldi.
    > (both are cheaper than Walmart except for the really awful squishy white
    > bread.)
    >
    > I can bake a 2 pound loaf of sourdough bread for just a few cents. At
    > least last time I bought a 25# bag of flour at Sam's it didn't cost
    > hardly anything -- but that was over a year ago.
    >
    > -Bob

    See what the price is now Bob. Seems fuel prices and inflation have
    driven most food stuffs up about 20 to 30 percent. Even rice, which is
    grown here, has nearly doubled in price in the last year. Beef is
    selling at record prices, mostly due to the drought in
    Texas. So many cattle were sold to avoid drought deaths that the price
    went down for a bit but is really up now. Other parts of the US are
    either suffering drought or excessive rainfall, all of that affects the
    price of the food we buy. The food banks here are seeing more people
    showing up looking for food. Welfare rolls are expanding. We are seeing
    a rise in employment rates though. We have a new, very large casino
    coming on line for construction and one of the local petrochem plants is
    getting ready to build a multi-billion dollar expansion. That will help
    our local economy and the state's too.

  14. #14
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    George Shirley <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Our hobby farm is 75 feet wide and 150 feet long, I think many of the
    > folks on this newsgroup have even smaller places. We once lived for years
    > on ten acres and had another ten acres to grow things on. At age 72 that
    > ain't gonna happen again. Each of us should enjoy their own place on the
    > curve as others have said.


    I often wonder... I was born and raised in the city and did not like the
    big city and always wanted to live in the country. When I did some teaching
    in the local schools I found that many kids born and raised in the country
    wanted to move and live in the big city.

    Sounds like we swapped lives. I enjoy the country life... I hope you enjoy
    yours

    --
    Nad

  15. #15
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    On 09/29/2011 08:22 AM, gloria.p wrote:
    > On 9/29/2011 5:38 AM, Nad wrote:
    >
    >> A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    >> Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?
    >>

    >
    > I do make a couple of kinds of bread on occasion but haven't gotten into
    > making sandwich bread regularly. Convenience is the word.


    We make most of our own bread, and I'm honestly not criticizing anyone
    who doesn't, but I wanted to say that once you get into the routine of
    doing it, it's not every inconvenient, especially if you use tools to
    help with the one labor-intensive part, the kneading.

    Serene
    --
    http://www.momfoodproject.com

  16. #16
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 09/29/2011 08:22 AM, gloria.p wrote:
    >> On 9/29/2011 5:38 AM, Nad wrote:
    >>
    >>> A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    >>> Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?
    >>>

    >>
    >> I do make a couple of kinds of bread on occasion but haven't gotten into
    >> making sandwich bread regularly. Convenience is the word.

    >
    > We make most of our own bread, and I'm honestly not criticizing anyone
    > who doesn't, but I wanted to say that once you get into the routine of
    > doing it, it's not every inconvenient, especially if you use tools to
    > help with the one labor-intensive part, the kneading.
    >
    > Serene


    I take it you also have one of those "tools" called the Automatic Bread
    Machine that does most if not all of the work?

    --
    Nad

  17. #17
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    On 10/01/2011 08:46 AM, Nad wrote:
    > Serene Vannoy<[email protected]> wrote:
    >> On 09/29/2011 08:22 AM, gloria.p wrote:
    >>> On 9/29/2011 5:38 AM, Nad wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    >>>> Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> I do make a couple of kinds of bread on occasion but haven't gotten into
    >>> making sandwich bread regularly. Convenience is the word.

    >>
    >> We make most of our own bread, and I'm honestly not criticizing anyone
    >> who doesn't, but I wanted to say that once you get into the routine of
    >> doing it, it's not every inconvenient, especially if you use tools to
    >> help with the one labor-intensive part, the kneading.
    >>
    >> Serene

    >
    > I take it you also have one of those "tools" called the Automatic Bread
    > Machine that does most if not all of the work?


    Most (since we don't bake it in the machine; we prefer the texture of
    oven-baked bread), yes. We also have a good stand mixer and some
    excellent no-knead bread recipes.

    Don't be too quick to criticize people who aren't as "pure" as you are;
    it make you look like an ass, and it doesn't encourage people to emulate
    you, but to avoid you.

    Serene

    --
    http://www.momfoodproject.com

  18. #18
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    Serene Vannoy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > Don't be too quick to criticize people who aren't as "pure" as you are;
    > it make you look like an ass, and it doesn't encourage people to emulate
    > you, but to avoid you.
    >
    > Serene


    People that cannot take criticism or defend their position with reasoning
    are weak minded people. Weak minded people often use profanity instead of
    reasoning to express their views... Example: "You are <- enter body part ->
    if you think like this.

    Are you that weak minded? Those that use profanity are to be emulated like
    yourself are the "Good" people? I will let you have the last word

    --
    Nad

  19. #19
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    this is something i am considering atm, made good use of the abm, always
    just used a hand mixer but am reading about the benifits of the nicer food
    processors. now since i rarely make cakes or things that need a big mixer,
    but like the idea of using the bigger mixer or a food processor for the
    bread kneading chores i am curious to hear other's opinions, when we get
    back into the house i would like to make several kinds of rolls to get ready
    to bake and then freeze them. doing this will allow us to cook just what we
    want for that meal, which once we decide the meal will allow the bread to
    cook whilst the rest is being prepared.

    what say all of you who have experience with all three items, if you could
    only buy one of the three, which one and why? which would help most to you
    for bulk cooking and preserving? Lee
    "Serene Vannoy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On 10/01/2011 08:46 AM, Nad wrote:
    >> Serene Vannoy<[email protected]> wrote:
    >>> On 09/29/2011 08:22 AM, gloria.p wrote:
    >>>> On 9/29/2011 5:38 AM, Nad wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> A food preserving forum talking about "buying" and freezing bread?
    >>>>> Do we not make our own bread? But make our own Jams and Juices?
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> I do make a couple of kinds of bread on occasion but haven't gotten
    >>>> into
    >>>> making sandwich bread regularly. Convenience is the word.
    >>>
    >>> We make most of our own bread, and I'm honestly not criticizing anyone
    >>> who doesn't, but I wanted to say that once you get into the routine of
    >>> doing it, it's not every inconvenient, especially if you use tools to
    >>> help with the one labor-intensive part, the kneading.
    >>>
    >>> Serene

    >>
    >> I take it you also have one of those "tools" called the Automatic Bread
    >> Machine that does most if not all of the work?

    >
    > Most (since we don't bake it in the machine; we prefer the texture of
    > oven-baked bread), yes. We also have a good stand mixer and some excellent
    > no-knead bread recipes.
    >
    > Don't be too quick to criticize people who aren't as "pure" as you are; it
    > make you look like an ass, and it doesn't encourage people to emulate you,
    > but to avoid you.
    >
    > Serene
    >
    > --
    > http://www.momfoodproject.com




  20. #20
    Nad Guest

    Default Re: Bread prices redux

    "Storrmmee" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > this is something i am considering atm, made good use of the abm, always
    > just used a hand mixer but am reading about the benifits of the nicer food
    > processors. now since i rarely make cakes or things that need a big mixer,
    > but like the idea of using the bigger mixer or a food processor for the
    > bread kneading chores i am curious to hear other's opinions, when we get
    > back into the house i would like to make several kinds of rolls to get ready
    > to bake and then freeze them. doing this will allow us to cook just what we
    > want for that meal, which once we decide the meal will allow the bread to
    > cook whilst the rest is being prepared.
    >
    > what say all of you who have experience with all three items, if you could
    > only buy one of the three, which one and why? which would help most to you
    > for bulk cooking and preserving? Lee


    My problem with bread making at home is that the long cold winters makes it
    difficult for the dough too rise. I also prefer the house temperature to be
    no more than 70F and dough rises poorly at that temp. A bread machine has
    heating elements in for making dough for roll ands pizzas. I will make
    sourdough breads during the summer in which house temperature is ideal for
    sourdoughs. I also freeze the doughs for pizzas and for rolls.

    I cannot justify owning a large stand mixer, because I will still have to
    let the dough rise somewhere it is warm. I do own a nice food processor
    with a dough blade and it does a good job for the smaller amounts of dough
    during the summer and for candy making. I also use the dough blade to make
    corn tortillas. For general mixing, making cookies and other things, I find
    the hand mixer works just fine.

    My food processor only has a 12 cup capacity which is fine for me. If you
    plan on making large amounts of breads a stand mixer may be a very useful.

    Excluding the cost of the ABM, mine cost around $150. It cost less than
    fifty cents to make a loaf of basic sandwich bread. I also use the bread
    machine more often than the food processor or hand mixer. The cleanup with
    the bread machine as almost none existent. The food processor has several
    parts to clean

    But this discussion was well covered the the Cooking newsgroup last week.

    --
    Nad

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