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Thread: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

  1. #1
    emmy007 Guest

    Default Are you fond of vanilla flavor?


    Many people love vanilla ice creams and cakes in childhood. In fact, the
    vanilla flavor we are used to is not natural, but man-made food
    addictive, called vanillin which looks quite similar with word formation
    vanilla. Except names, they share similar flavor and taste. It's the
    first artificial synthesis for food essence. It is in the form of white
    or light yellow crystalline with vanilla and rich milk fragrance, the
    main ingredients of vanilla essence for candies, cakes, biscuits and on
    on.

    Why not make use of natural vanilla? In that case, we may not be able to
    afford vanilla food. As natural vanilla is a rare plant in tropic
    regions, food makers have to make a big budget on taking raw materials.
    Since artificial vanilla, 'vanillin(121-33-5)'
    (http://www.weiku.com/chemicals/121-33-5.html), taste the same as
    natural one and it can be made anywhere in the world, it could be a good
    choice to cut down costs.




    --
    emmy007

  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

    On 8/31/2011 5:46 AM, emmy007 wrote:
    > Many people love vanilla ice creams and cakes in childhood. In fact, the
    > vanilla flavor we are used to is not natural, but man-made food
    > addictive, called vanillin which looks quite similar with word formation
    > vanilla. Except names, they share similar flavor and taste. It's the
    > first artificial synthesis for food essence. It is in the form of white
    > or light yellow crystalline with vanilla and rich milk fragrance, the
    > main ingredients of vanilla essence for candies, cakes, biscuits and on
    > on.
    >
    > Why not make use of natural vanilla? In that case, we may not be able to
    > afford vanilla food. As natural vanilla is a rare plant in tropic
    > regions, food makers have to make a big budget on taking raw materials.
    > Since artificial vanilla, 'vanillin(121-33-5)'
    > (http://www.weiku.com/chemicals/121-33-5.html), taste the same as
    > natural one and it can be made anywhere in the world, it could be a good
    > choice to cut down costs.
    >


    Yes, real natural vanilla is a great flavor and beats synthetics.
    However, "vanillin" is not just similar in sound but is a major
    component of "vanilla" from Vanilla Beans.


    --


    James Silverton, Potomac

    I'm *not* [email protected]

  3. #3
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

    On Aug 31, 5:46*am, emmy007 <emmy007.8a40229.659...@foodbanter.com>
    wrote:
    > Many people love vanilla ice creams and cakes in childhood. In fact, the
    > vanilla flavor we are used to is not natural, but man-made food
    > addictive, called vanillin which looks quite similar with word formation
    > vanilla. Except names, they share similar flavor and taste. It's the
    > first artificial synthesis for food essence. It is in the form of white
    > or light yellow crystalline with vanilla and rich milk fragrance, the
    > main ingredients of vanilla essence for candies, cakes, biscuits and on
    > on.
    >
    > Why not make use of natural vanilla? In that case, we may not be able to
    > afford vanilla food. As natural vanilla is a rare plant in tropic
    > regions, food makers have to make a big budget on taking raw materials.
    > Since artificial vanilla, 'vanillin(121-33-5)'
    > (http://www.weiku.com/chemicals/121-33-5.html), taste the same as
    > natural one and it can be made anywhere in the world, it could be a good
    > choice to cut down costs.
    >
    > --
    > emmy007


    Ice cream - no. Body butter - no. Candles - never.
    Almond milk - yes.

  4. #4
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    emmy007 <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Many people love vanilla ice creams and cakes in childhood. In fact, the
    > vanilla flavor we are used to is not natural, but man-made food
    > addictive, called vanillin which looks quite similar with word formation
    > vanilla. Except names, they share similar flavor and taste. It's the
    > first artificial synthesis for food essence. It is in the form of white
    > or light yellow crystalline with vanilla and rich milk fragrance, the
    > main ingredients of vanilla essence for candies, cakes, biscuits and on
    > on.
    >
    > Why not make use of natural vanilla? In that case, we may not be able to
    > afford vanilla food. As natural vanilla is a rare plant in tropic
    > regions, food makers have to make a big budget on taking raw materials.
    > Since artificial vanilla, 'vanillin(121-33-5)'
    > (http://www.weiku.com/chemicals/121-33-5.html), taste the same as
    > natural one and it can be made anywhere in the world, it could be a good
    > choice to cut down costs.


    Taste them out of the bottle, just a drop. Then tell me they still
    taste the same.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  5. #5
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?


    "emmy007" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > Many people love vanilla ice creams and cakes in childhood. In fact, the
    > vanilla flavor we are used to is not natural, but man-made food
    > addictive, called vanillin which looks quite similar with word formation
    > vanilla. Except names, they share similar flavor and taste. It's the
    > first artificial synthesis for food essence. It is in the form of white
    > or light yellow crystalline with vanilla and rich milk fragrance, the
    > main ingredients of vanilla essence for candies, cakes, biscuits and on
    > on.
    >
    > Why not make use of natural vanilla? In that case, we may not be able to
    > afford vanilla food. As natural vanilla is a rare plant in tropic
    > regions, food makers have to make a big budget on taking raw materials.
    > Since artificial vanilla, 'vanillin(121-33-5)'
    > (http://www.weiku.com/chemicals/121-33-5.html), taste the same as
    > natural one and it can be made anywhere in the world, it could be a good
    > choice to cut down costs.


    Nope. Not fond of it at all. It needs to be in some things like chocolate
    cakes and various cookies. Without it they taste flat. But as a standalone
    flavor? Nope. Not at all. It is my daughter's favorite flavor.

    I can't stand the scent either. I just found some archaic vanilla yogurt in
    the fridge. I almost gagged having to flush it down the sink.



  6. #6
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote
    > Nope. Not fond of it at all. It needs to be in some things like
    > chocolate cakes and various cookies. Without it they taste flat. But as
    > a standalone flavor? Nope. Not at all. It is my daughter's favorite
    > flavor.
    >
    > I can't stand the scent either. I just found some archaic vanilla yogurt
    > in the fridge. I almost gagged having to flush it down the sink.
    >


    Vanilla is the favorite of us that are pure of heart and soul.


  7. #7
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

    "Ed Pawlowski" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> Nope. Not fond of it at all. It needs to be in some things like
    >> chocolate cakes and various cookies. Without it they taste flat.
    >> But as a standalone flavor? Nope. Not at all. It is my daughter's
    >> favorite flavor.
    >>
    >> I can't stand the scent either. I just found some archaic vanilla
    >> yogurt in the fridge. I almost gagged having to flush it down the
    >> sink.
    >>

    >
    > Vanilla is the favorite of us that are pure of heart and soul.



    I'm a big fan of vanilla ice cream but I don't use vanilla in cooking.

    I should rephrase that... I'm a big fan of ice cream.

    Andy

  8. #8
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

    Baskin-Robbins, the 31 flavors of ice cream, opened a store in the
    Philipenes.

    When I was there I walked in and said "I'll have two scoops, make it
    Manilla!"

    Andy

  9. #9
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

    Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote
    >> Nope. Not fond of it at all. It needs to be in some things like
    >> chocolate cakes and various cookies. Without it they taste flat. But
    >> as a standalone flavor? Nope. Not at all. It is my daughter's
    >> favorite flavor.
    >>
    >> I can't stand the scent either. I just found some archaic vanilla
    >> yogurt in the fridge. I almost gagged having to flush it down the
    >> sink.

    >
    > Vanilla is the favorite of us that are pure of heart and soul.


    +1!



    -S-



  10. #10
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: Are you fond of vanilla flavor?

    Miche wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > emmy007 <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Many people love vanilla ice creams and cakes in childhood. In fact, the
    >> vanilla flavor we are used to is not natural, but man-made food
    >> addictive, called vanillin which looks quite similar with word formation
    >> vanilla. Except names, they share similar flavor and taste. It's the
    >> first artificial synthesis for food essence. It is in the form of white
    >> or light yellow crystalline with vanilla and rich milk fragrance, the
    >> main ingredients of vanilla essence for candies, cakes, biscuits and on
    >> on.
    >>
    >> Why not make use of natural vanilla? In that case, we may not be able to
    >> afford vanilla food. As natural vanilla is a rare plant in tropic
    >> regions, food makers have to make a big budget on taking raw materials.
    >> Since artificial vanilla, 'vanillin(121-33-5)'
    >> (http://www.weiku.com/chemicals/121-33-5.html), taste the same as
    >> natural one and it can be made anywhere in the world, it could be a good
    >> choice to cut down costs.

    >
    > Taste them out of the bottle, just a drop. Then tell me they still
    > taste the same.
    >
    > Miche
    >

    I was thinking about this just the other day--how some people say
    they taste the same and others (like me) think they taste very
    different. I wonder whether this a a genetic thing, like the
    varied perceptions of cilantro are?

    I will add that a couple of years ago I became quite fond of an
    Italian Christmas cake (the name is eluding me at this moment).
    The next year I bought several brands of them, so I could rank
    them. One was flavored with vanillin, and I was just vile. That
    flavor just ruined the whole thing for me.

    --
    Jean B.

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