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Thread: Yogurt Cheese Spread

  1. #1
    M. JL Esq. Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    Mark Thorson wrote:


    >
    > I'm trying to think of other possibilities.
    > Dried shrimp might work, but I usually don't
    > use those for anything. I'm dubious of any
    > Asian shrimp or prawns. Conpoy is another
    > thought, but I've never used it for anything
    > and it's really expensive. If anything vegan
    > could be substituted, I'm thinking capers
    > might work here. They have quite a bit of
    > flavor, which might be discernable above the
    > tartness of the yogurt.
    >
    > Any other suggestions?


    First, try using cheese cloth instead of coffee filters.

    Then, a favourite of mine (Tzatziki sauce) is peeled, seeded, mashed and
    squeezed dry cucumber, add fresh lemon juice, raw mashed garlic, s & p.
    and mix with the yoghurt cheese.

    For further additions & suggestions see:

    http://www.tzatzikisauce.net/
    --
    JL

  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Yogurt Cheese Spread

    I recalled my mom making yogurt cheese many years ago
    by hanging up some yogurt in a juice bag over the
    kitchen sink and letting the water run out. It made
    for a tart spread that was very nice. She added some
    red and green bits to it. I think the red bits were
    Bac-O's and the green bits were chopped chives.

    I recently tried doing the same thing, more or less.
    I started with Fage 2% Greek strained yogurt. I got
    very little liquid out of it straining it through
    coffee filters, so I guess this is already what I
    was trying to make, though it's not as stiff as what
    my mom made.

    My first experiment added chopped green onion and
    the drained contents of a can of water-packed
    baby clams. The flavor of the green onion kind of
    got lost in the yogurt, so my next two experiments
    used minced shallots which worked better.

    I wasn't very happy with the clams either. The
    first can was from Thailand, and had sort of an
    off-flavor and texture. The second can was from
    Indonesia, and slightly better. The third can
    was Geisha brand from Malaysia, and it was
    definitely the best, though not as good as I
    remember Geisha as being.

    In all cases, the clams didn't stand up to the
    yogurt very well. Yesterday, I tried bacon.
    I got a 12 oz. package of uncured bacon from
    Trader Joe's. Maybe 2/3 of that made it into
    the yogurt. It is a very smoky bacon, almost
    too smoky. But it worked quite well. The bacon
    was a very good complement to the yogurt. The
    strong flavor stood up very well to the tartness
    of the yogurt, and the tartness cut through the
    fattiness of the bacon.

    I ate it spread on Ak-Mak crackers.

    I'm trying to think of other possibilities.
    Dried shrimp might work, but I usually don't
    use those for anything. I'm dubious of any
    Asian shrimp or prawns. Conpoy is another
    thought, but I've never used it for anything
    and it's really expensive. If anything vegan
    could be substituted, I'm thinking capers
    might work here. They have quite a bit of
    flavor, which might be discernable above the
    tartness of the yogurt.

    Any other suggestions?

  3. #3
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    "M. JL Esq." wrote:
    >
    > First, try using cheese cloth instead of coffee filters.
    >
    > Then, a favourite of mine (Tzatziki sauce) is peeled, seeded, mashed and
    > squeezed dry cucumber, add fresh lemon juice, raw mashed garlic, s & p.
    > and mix with the yoghurt cheese.
    >
    > For further additions & suggestions see:
    >
    > http://www.tzatzikisauce.net/
    > --
    > JL


    Thanks. That sounds good, and more healthful
    than bacon.

  4. #4
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    In article <iopua7$s92$[email protected]>,
    "M. JL Esq." <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    >
    > >
    > > I'm trying to think of other possibilities.
    > > Dried shrimp might work, but I usually don't
    > > use those for anything. I'm dubious of any
    > > Asian shrimp or prawns. Conpoy is another
    > > thought, but I've never used it for anything
    > > and it's really expensive. If anything vegan
    > > could be substituted, I'm thinking capers
    > > might work here. They have quite a bit of
    > > flavor, which might be discernable above the
    > > tartness of the yogurt.
    > >
    > > Any other suggestions?

    >
    > First, try using cheese cloth instead of coffee filters.
    >
    > Then, a favourite of mine (Tzatziki sauce) is peeled, seeded, mashed and
    > squeezed dry cucumber, add fresh lemon juice, raw mashed garlic, s & p.
    > and mix with the yoghurt cheese.
    >
    > For further additions & suggestions see:
    >
    > http://www.tzatzikisauce.net/
    > --
    > JL


    I wonder if you drained it long enough and pressed it, if it'd come out
    similar to Paneer?
    --
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  5. #5
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    On Apr 22, 12:53*am, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > "M. JL Esq." wrote:
    >
    > > First, try using cheese cloth instead of coffee filters.

    >
    > > Then, a favourite of mine (Tzatziki sauce) is peeled, seeded, mashed and
    > > squeezed dry cucumber, add fresh lemon juice, raw mashed garlic, s & p.
    > > and mix with the yoghurt cheese.

    >
    > > For further additions & suggestions see:

    >
    > >http://www.tzatzikisauce.net/
    > > --
    > > JL

    >
    > Thanks. *That sounds good, and more healthful
    > than bacon.


    It's good on bacon too. And shish kebab. And as a dip for chips.
    And ....

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  6. #6
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    Omelet wrote:
    >
    > I wonder if you drained it long enough and pressed it, if it'd come out
    > similar to Paneer?


    I doubt it. The paneer I've had was rather bland.
    A firm yogurt cheese would be very tart.

  7. #7
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > >
    > > I wonder if you drained it long enough and pressed it, if it'd come out
    > > similar to Paneer?

    >
    > I doubt it. The paneer I've had was rather bland.
    > A firm yogurt cheese would be very tart.


    True. Paneer is not fermented. I'm wondering tho' about the texture?
    I have some unbleached Muslin put away for kitchen use and have
    considered draining yogurt many times, but have just not gotten a round
    tuit yet.
    --
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > Omelet wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > I wonder if you drained it long enough and pressed it, if it'd come out
    > > > > similar to Paneer?
    > > >
    > > > I doubt it. The paneer I've had was rather bland.
    > > > A firm yogurt cheese would be very tart.

    > >
    > > True. Paneer is not fermented. I'm wondering tho' about the texture?
    > > I have some unbleached Muslin put away for kitchen use and have
    > > considered draining yogurt many times, but have just not gotten a round
    > > tuit yet.

    >
    > As I recall, the paneer I've had had a subtle, coarse
    > grain to it, like tofu. Yogurt cheese is entirely
    > smooth.


    Paneer is coagulated milk with an acid (sort of like making quick curds
    or cottage cheese) then pressed to make a solid cake. Sounds pretty
    simple! I've just not tried it yet.

    Hm, I wonder about cheating and getting some large curd cottage cheese
    and pressing that into a solid? ;-)
    --
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  9. #9
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    Omelet wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Omelet wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I wonder if you drained it long enough and pressed it, if it'd come out
    > > > similar to Paneer?

    > >
    > > I doubt it. The paneer I've had was rather bland.
    > > A firm yogurt cheese would be very tart.

    >
    > True. Paneer is not fermented. I'm wondering tho' about the texture?
    > I have some unbleached Muslin put away for kitchen use and have
    > considered draining yogurt many times, but have just not gotten a round
    > tuit yet.


    As I recall, the paneer I've had had a subtle, coarse
    grain to it, like tofu. Yogurt cheese is entirely
    smooth.

  10. #10
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    Omelet wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > As I recall, the paneer I've had had a subtle, coarse
    > > grain to it, like tofu. Yogurt cheese is entirely
    > > smooth.

    >
    > Paneer is coagulated milk with an acid (sort of like making quick curds
    > or cottage cheese) then pressed to make a solid cake. Sounds pretty
    > simple! I've just not tried it yet.
    >
    > Hm, I wonder about cheating and getting some large curd cottage cheese
    > and pressing that into a solid? ;-)


    I think small curd would be closer. When I said
    coarse, I didn't mean as course as large curd.
    I'd suggest using as little pressure as necessary
    to get it to hold together. The paneer I've had
    practically fell apart in my mouth.

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    > >
    > > In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > > > As I recall, the paneer I've had had a subtle, coarse
    > > > grain to it, like tofu. Yogurt cheese is entirely
    > > > smooth.

    > >
    > > Paneer is coagulated milk with an acid (sort of like making quick curds
    > > or cottage cheese) then pressed to make a solid cake. Sounds pretty
    > > simple! I've just not tried it yet.
    > >
    > > Hm, I wonder about cheating and getting some large curd cottage cheese
    > > and pressing that into a solid? ;-)

    >
    > I think small curd would be closer. When I said
    > coarse, I didn't mean as course as large curd.
    > I'd suggest using as little pressure as necessary
    > to get it to hold together. The paneer I've had
    > practically fell apart in my mouth.


    Could be interesting!
    --
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  12. #12
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    On Apr 23, 1:15*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:

    ...

    > Paneer is coagulated milk with an acid (sort of like making quick curds
    > or cottage cheese) then pressed to make a solid cake. *Sounds pretty
    > simple! *I've just not tried it yet.
    >
    > Hm, I wonder about cheating and getting some large curd cottage cheese
    > and pressing that into a solid? *;-)


    That sounds a bit like cottage cheese to me.

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  13. #13
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    On Apr 23, 12:45*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:

    ...

    > I have some unbleached Muslin put away for kitchen use and have
    > considered draining yogurt many times, but have just not gotten a round
    > tuit yet.


    Line a strainer with a square of cheese cloth folded in quarters to
    make a filter for yogurt. My strainer rides the rim of a pot so no
    sink space is needed while it drains.

    Jerry
    --
    "The rights of the best of men are secured only as the
    rights of the vilest and most abhorrent are protected."
    - Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, 1927

  14. #14
    Landon Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    On Sat, 23 Apr 2011 00:15:54 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Omelet wrote:
    >> >
    >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    >> > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >
    >> > > Omelet wrote:
    >> > > >
    >> > > > I wonder if you drained it long enough and pressed it, if it'd come out
    >> > > > similar to Paneer?
    >> > >
    >> > > I doubt it. The paneer I've had was rather bland.
    >> > > A firm yogurt cheese would be very tart.
    >> >
    >> > True. Paneer is not fermented. I'm wondering tho' about the texture?
    >> > I have some unbleached Muslin put away for kitchen use and have
    >> > considered draining yogurt many times, but have just not gotten a round
    >> > tuit yet.

    >>
    >> As I recall, the paneer I've had had a subtle, coarse
    >> grain to it, like tofu. Yogurt cheese is entirely
    >> smooth.

    >
    >Paneer is coagulated milk with an acid (sort of like making quick curds
    >or cottage cheese) then pressed to make a solid cake. Sounds pretty
    >simple! I've just not tried it yet.


    From:
    http://tiny.cc/wr51w

    Paneer (Also known as "Farmers Cheese")
    Paneer is a recent discovery for me. It turned out to be one of my
    favorites for its creamy taste, texture and versatility as an addition
    to many, many recipes.

    It's so easy to make that you'll find it's easy to always have some on
    hand.

    Ingredients:

    1 gallon of whole milk
    The juice of one whole lemon or lime

    Utensils needed:

    Large metal pan
    Large spoon
    Cheese cloth
    Colander
    Glass Loaf Pan


    Method:

    Prepare by placing the colander in the sink with a double layer of
    cheese cloth pushed down into itís entire inside surface.

    Juice the lemon or lime and have it in a small glass without any pulp
    or seeds.

    Heat the milk while stirring. Donít allow it to scald or film on the
    bottom of the pan. It takes about 10 minutes for the milk to come to
    just under boiling. Donít boil it. At the first sign of a simmer, turn
    off the heat.

    While stirring slowly, add the lemon or lime juice. Stir only long
    enough to mix well.

    Youíll see the milk start forming curds. Let this continue for about
    10 minutes. No stirring is necessary during this part.

    After 10 minutes, carefully pour the water/curd mix through the cheese
    cloth in the sink. The curds will be collected in the cheesecloth
    draped colander. Let this drain until you can touch it without burning
    yourself.

    Then gather the four corners of the cheese cloth and pick up the
    entire ball of curd.

    Turn the ball of curd while holding the extra cloth at the top until
    the water is forced from it. Do this gently. Don't get crazy with
    this.

    Put the curd into a small glass loaf pan and press it with your
    fingers or fist until it's nice and flat and about 1/2" thick. Cover
    it and put it into the refrigerator over night.

    Use it by cutting Ĺ inch strips from it and making cubes from it. Add
    it to soups, stews, gravies, bean dishes, vegetable dishes and any
    recipe with a sauce.

    It adds a very rich, creamy taste to many recipes.

    A dish very popular in India is Paneer Jalfrezi. Its sautťed onions
    and green peppers with masala seasoning. Paneer added to this makes a
    really good vegetable dish.


  15. #15
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 23:45:51 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > but have just not gotten a round tuit yet.
    >--

    You are too funny.

    koko
    --
    Food is our common ground, a universal experience
    James Beard

    www.kokoscornerblog.com

    Natural Watkins Spices
    www.apinchofspices.com

  16. #16
    David Goldbeck Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    On Apr 21, 3:30*pm, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > I recalled my mom making yogurt cheese many years ago
    > by hanging up some yogurt in a juice bag over the
    > kitchen sink and letting the water run out. *It made
    > for a tart spread that was very nice. *She added some
    > red and green bits to it. *I think the red bits were
    > Bac-O's and the green bits were chopped chives.
    >
    > I recently tried doing the same thing, more or less.
    > I started with Fage 2% Greek strained yogurt. *I got
    > very little liquid out of it straining it through
    > coffee filters, so I guess this is already what I
    > was trying to make, though it's not as stiff as what
    > my mom made.
    >
    > My first experiment added chopped green onion and
    > the drained contents of a can of water-packed
    > baby clams. *The flavor of the green onion kind of
    > got lost in the yogurt, so my next two experiments
    > used minced shallots which worked better.
    >
    > I wasn't very happy with the clams either. *The
    > first can was from Thailand, and had sort of an
    > off-flavor and texture. *The second can was from
    > Indonesia, and slightly better. *The third can
    > was Geisha brand from Malaysia, and it was
    > definitely the best, though not as good as I
    > remember Geisha as being.
    >
    > In all cases, the clams didn't stand up to the
    > yogurt very well. *Yesterday, I tried bacon.
    > I got a 12 oz. package of uncured bacon from
    > Trader Joe's. *Maybe 2/3 of that made it into
    > the yogurt. *It is a very smoky bacon, almost
    > too smoky. *But it worked quite well. *The bacon
    > was a very good complement to the yogurt. *The
    > strong flavor stood up very well to the tartness
    > of the yogurt, and the tartness cut through the
    > fattiness of the bacon.
    >
    > I ate it spread on Ak-Mak crackers.
    >
    > I'm trying to think of other possibilities.
    > Dried shrimp might work, but I usually don't
    > use those for anything. *I'm dubious of any
    > Asian shrimp or prawns. *Conpoy is another
    > thought, but I've never used it for anything
    > and it's really expensive. *If anything vegan
    > could be substituted, I'm thinking capers
    > might work here. *They have quite a bit of
    > flavor, which might be discernable above the
    > tartness of the yogurt.
    >
    > Any other suggestions?


    The book "Eat Well the YoChee Way" has 100's of ideas. Slide show at
    YoChee.com

  17. #17
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    Jerry Avins <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Apr 23, 12:45*am, Omelet <ompome...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > ...
    >
    > > I have some unbleached Muslin put away for kitchen use and have
    > > considered draining yogurt many times, but have just not gotten a round
    > > tuit yet.

    >
    > Line a strainer with a square of cheese cloth folded in quarters to
    > make a filter for yogurt. My strainer rides the rim of a pot so no
    > sink space is needed while it drains.
    >
    > Jerry
    > --
    > "The rights of the best of men are secured only as the
    > rights of the vilest and most abhorrent are protected."
    > - Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, 1927


    Plus you can save the whey!
    --
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  18. #18
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Landon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 23 Apr 2011 00:15:54 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>,
    > > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Omelet wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> > In article <[email protected]>,
    > >> > Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> > > Omelet wrote:
    > >> > > >
    > >> > > > I wonder if you drained it long enough and pressed it, if it'd come
    > >> > > > out
    > >> > > > similar to Paneer?
    > >> > >
    > >> > > I doubt it. The paneer I've had was rather bland.
    > >> > > A firm yogurt cheese would be very tart.
    > >> >
    > >> > True. Paneer is not fermented. I'm wondering tho' about the texture?
    > >> > I have some unbleached Muslin put away for kitchen use and have
    > >> > considered draining yogurt many times, but have just not gotten a round
    > >> > tuit yet.
    > >>
    > >> As I recall, the paneer I've had had a subtle, coarse
    > >> grain to it, like tofu. Yogurt cheese is entirely
    > >> smooth.

    > >
    > >Paneer is coagulated milk with an acid (sort of like making quick curds
    > >or cottage cheese) then pressed to make a solid cake. Sounds pretty
    > >simple! I've just not tried it yet.

    >
    > From:
    > http://tiny.cc/wr51w
    >
    > Paneer (Also known as "Farmers Cheese")
    > Paneer is a recent discovery for me. It turned out to be one of my
    > favorites for its creamy taste, texture and versatility as an addition
    > to many, many recipes.
    >
    > It's so easy to make that you'll find it's easy to always have some on
    > hand.
    >
    > Ingredients:
    >
    > 1 gallon of whole milk
    > The juice of one whole lemon or lime
    >
    > Utensils needed:
    >
    > Large metal pan
    > Large spoon
    > Cheese cloth
    > Colander
    > Glass Loaf Pan
    >
    >
    > Method:
    >
    > Prepare by placing the colander in the sink with a double layer of
    > cheese cloth pushed down into itís entire inside surface.
    >
    > Juice the lemon or lime and have it in a small glass without any pulp
    > or seeds.
    >
    > Heat the milk while stirring. Donít allow it to scald or film on the
    > bottom of the pan. It takes about 10 minutes for the milk to come to
    > just under boiling. Donít boil it. At the first sign of a simmer, turn
    > off the heat.
    >
    > While stirring slowly, add the lemon or lime juice. Stir only long
    > enough to mix well.
    >
    > Youíll see the milk start forming curds. Let this continue for about
    > 10 minutes. No stirring is necessary during this part.
    >
    > After 10 minutes, carefully pour the water/curd mix through the cheese
    > cloth in the sink. The curds will be collected in the cheesecloth
    > draped colander. Let this drain until you can touch it without burning
    > yourself.
    >
    > Then gather the four corners of the cheese cloth and pick up the
    > entire ball of curd.
    >
    > Turn the ball of curd while holding the extra cloth at the top until
    > the water is forced from it. Do this gently. Don't get crazy with
    > this.
    >
    > Put the curd into a small glass loaf pan and press it with your
    > fingers or fist until it's nice and flat and about 1/2" thick. Cover
    > it and put it into the refrigerator over night.
    >
    > Use it by cutting Ĺ inch strips from it and making cubes from it. Add
    > it to soups, stews, gravies, bean dishes, vegetable dishes and any
    > recipe with a sauce.
    >
    > It adds a very rich, creamy taste to many recipes.
    >
    > A dish very popular in India is Paneer Jalfrezi. Its sautťed onions
    > and green peppers with masala seasoning. Paneer added to this makes a
    > really good vegetable dish.


    Thanks for the description! I follow the weekly videos on foodforu.ca
    and have seen several paneer recipes. I really do want to try it one of
    these days!
    --
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  19. #19
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > On Fri, 22 Apr 2011 23:45:51 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > but have just not gotten a round tuit yet.
    > >--

    > You are too funny.
    >
    > koko


    ;-)
    --
    --
    Peace, Om
    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Politics is supposed to be the second oldest profession. I have
    come to realize that it bears a very close resemblance to the first."
    -- Mark Twain

  20. #20
    Landon Guest

    Default Re: Yogurt Cheese Spread

    On Sat, 23 Apr 2011 23:46:31 -0500, Omelet <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Thanks for the description! I follow the weekly videos on foodforu.ca
    >and have seen several paneer recipes. I really do want to try it one of
    >these days!
    >--


    You're very welcome, Omelet. Thank you for the link to the site.
    Indian dishes are some of my favorite meals.

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