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Thread: yeast for bread machines

  1. #1
    notbob Guest

    Default yeast for bread machines

    I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's "active
    dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be working
    going in. Hard to get faster than that.

    My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    ye?

    nb

  2. #2
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines


    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    > recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's
    > "active
    > dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    > measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be
    > working
    > going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    >
    > My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    > if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    > ye?
    >
    >

    I *always* proof yeast.... like why wouldn't anyone not.



  3. #3
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    notbob wrote:
    > I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    > recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's "active
    > dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    > measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be working
    > going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    >
    > My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    > if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    > ye?
    >
    > nb

    If you can get it, get some vital wheat gluten. It will help.

    Tracy

  4. #4
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    On 2009-05-30, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > If you can get it, get some vital wheat gluten. It will help.


    That's what cshenk keeps telling me. So far, I've yet to find any.

    nb

  5. #5
    Mack A. Damia Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    On Sat, 30 May 2009 01:47:31 GMT, "brooklyn1"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>"notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    >
    >> My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    >> if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    >> ye?
    >>

    >I *always* proof yeast.... like why wouldn't anyone not.


    Why am I not surprised that you'd be the first to reply to a message
    that mentions, "dense loaf"?

    --
    mad

  6. #6
    Sky Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    notbob wrote:
    >
    > On 2009-05-30, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > If you can get it, get some vital wheat gluten. It will help.

    >
    > That's what cshenk keeps telling me. So far, I've yet to find any.
    >
    > nb


    If the grocery store has a 'natural foods' section, the vital wheat
    gluten (VWG) might be found there. The VWG I found was in one of those
    'clear dispenser' rows of containers where the customer uses a scoop to
    put the desired amount in a plastic bag. Then I write the PLU item
    number on a tie-wrap to secure the plastic bag's contents. I hope this
    makes sense

    Sky

    --
    Ultra Ultimate Kitchen Rule - Use the Timer!
    Ultimate Kitchen Rule -- Cook's Choice!!

  7. #7
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    On 2009-05-30, Sky <[email protected]> wrote:

    > 'clear dispenser' rows of containers where the customer uses a scoop to
    > put the desired amount in a plastic bag. Then I write the PLU item
    > number on a tie-wrap to secure the plastic bag's contents. I hope this
    > makes sense


    They're called bulk dispensers.

    We do have a pretty well stocked health/organic food store, here. They may
    have some. I was shocked to learn they didn't have soy bean sprout seeds,
    only mung bean.

    nb

  8. #8
    Tracy Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    notbob wrote:
    > On 2009-05-30, Sky <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> 'clear dispenser' rows of containers where the customer uses a scoop to
    >> put the desired amount in a plastic bag. Then I write the PLU item
    >> number on a tie-wrap to secure the plastic bag's contents. I hope this
    >> makes sense

    >
    > They're called bulk dispensers.
    >
    > We do have a pretty well stocked health/organic food store, here. They may
    > have some. I was shocked to learn they didn't have soy bean sprout seeds,
    > only mung bean.
    >
    > nb


    You might find it also prepackaged in the health foods section. Popular
    brands are Hodgson Mill and Bobs Red Mill. My local store has a
    selection of items from both companies. Both are also available online.

    Tracy

  9. #9
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    Tracy wrote:
    > notbob wrote:
    >> On 2009-05-30, Sky <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> 'clear dispenser' rows of containers where the customer uses a scoop to
    >>> put the desired amount in a plastic bag. Then I write the PLU item
    >>> number on a tie-wrap to secure the plastic bag's contents. I hope this
    >>> makes sense

    >>
    >> They're called bulk dispensers.
    >> We do have a pretty well stocked health/organic food store, here.
    >> They may
    >> have some. I was shocked to learn they didn't have soy bean sprout
    >> seeds,
    >> only mung bean.
    >> nb

    >
    > You might find it also prepackaged in the health foods section. Popular
    > brands are Hodgson Mill and Bobs Red Mill. My local store has a
    > selection of items from both companies. Both are also available online.
    >
    > Tracy

    I find both of those brands in the flour and grain section of the local
    Kroger store. For bread machine bread I just buy the "bread machine"
    yeast, whatever brand is available, right now I'm using the Kroger
    brand. The yeast is formulated for rapid rise in machine use. The vital
    gluten just helps in the rise for most breads.

  10. #10
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    On Sat, 30 May 2009 01:35:40 GMT, notbob <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    >recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's "active
    >dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    >measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be working
    >going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    >
    >My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    >if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    >ye?
    >
    >nb


    Here's and excerpt from Brother Juniper's Bread Book
    By Peter Reinhart, Brother Juniper's Bakery:
    <Quote>
    Most of our recipes are based on instant yeast. If you are using
    regular dry yeast, add 25 percent more yeast to the recipe and proof
    it before adding it to the dough.
    <End quote>
    If you intend to make much bread in your machine it'll be well worth
    your while to get a supply of "Instant" yeast. You simply add it to
    the machine after the other ingredients. No proofing required. Lots of
    different brands readily available these days. We've used SAF,
    Fermipan and Bakipan, all with excellent results. Buy the larger
    packages, much more cost effective than the little single envelopes.
    We pay CDN $5.99 for a 500 gram package of SAF, which will make about
    100 loaves of bread.
    To extend the shelf life, store it in an air tight container in the
    fridge or freezer.

    Ross.

  11. #11
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    On Sat, 30 May 2009 01:47:31 GMT, "brooklyn1"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]..
    >> I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    >> recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's
    >> "active
    >> dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    >> measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be
    >> working
    >> going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    >>
    >> My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    >> if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    >> ye?
    >>
    >>

    >I *always* proof yeast.... like why wouldn't anyone not.
    >


    When using properly stored instant yeast, proofing is totally
    unnecessary and a complete waste of time.

    Ross.

  12. #12
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines


    "notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    > recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's
    > "active
    > dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    > measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be
    > working
    > going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    >
    > My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    > if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    > ye?
    >
    > nb


    Your instruction book with have a ratio of regular to fast rising yeast.
    Look for the conversion and use a larger amount of the regular.

    Since the time in the machine for the mix,kneed, punch, rise does not change
    you'll need to make the conversion.

    Dimitri


  13. #13
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines


    On 30-May-2009, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > You might find it also prepackaged in the health foods section. Popular
    > brands are Hodgson Mill and Bobs Red Mill. My local store has a
    > selection of items from both companies. Both are also available online.
    >
    > Tracy


    My local grocer (STL suburb) stocks Bob's Red Mill gluten in two locations,
    "Nutrition" ("health" food, gluten free, sugar free, etc, basically, special
    needs) and the baking aisle.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  14. #14
    KenK Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    Tracy <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:gvq4a3$rk2$[email protected]:

    > notbob wrote:
    >> I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    >> recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's
    >> "active dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the
    >> yeast in the measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At
    >> least it would be working going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    >>
    >>
    >> My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly
    >> like if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise.
    >> What say ye?
    >>
    >> nb

    > If you can get it, get some vital wheat gluten. It will help.
    >
    > Tracy


    Wal-Mart has it, at least mine does. I always use it in the bread machine
    - tbs per cup of flour. Also, some bread recipes come out dense no matter
    what. I use jars of Fleischmann's Bread Machine yeast. I've also used
    bulk yeast from Smart & Final. I've never noticed much difference. I keep
    it in the freezer after opening it.

    --
    "When you choose the lesser of two evils, always
    remember that it is still an evil." - Max Lerner







  15. #15
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    In article <[email protected]>,
    KenK <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Tracy <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:gvq4a3$rk2$[email protected]:
    >
    > > notbob wrote:
    > >> I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    > >> recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's
    > >> "active dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the
    > >> yeast in the measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At
    > >> least it would be working going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly
    > >> like if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise.
    > >> What say ye?
    > >>
    > >> nb

    > > If you can get it, get some vital wheat gluten. It will help.

    >
    > Wal-Mart has it, at least mine does. I always use it in the bread machine
    > - tbs per cup of flour. Also, some bread recipes come out dense no matter
    > what. I use jars of Fleischmann's Bread Machine yeast. I've also used
    > bulk yeast from Smart & Final. I've never noticed much difference. I keep
    > it in the freezer after opening it.


    Yeah, that's what I do too. I make at least one loaf of bread a week,
    and think paying for the piddly little jars is just silly.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  16. #16
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    On 2009-05-30, [email protected] <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Most of our recipes are based on instant yeast. If you are using
    > regular dry yeast, add 25 percent more yeast to the recipe and proof
    > it before adding it to the dough.



    Thank you, Ross.

    nb

  17. #17
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines



    notbob wrote:
    >
    > I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    > recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's "active
    > dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    > measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be working
    > going in. Hard to get faster than that.



    Yes. That is what we used to do when we had a bread machine. Put the
    liquid in the container, switch it on to warm the liquid. Turn off the
    machine. Add the yeast and a spoon of flour and let it go while
    measuring out the rest of the ingredients. Works perfectly well.
    Just didn't see the point of having two sorts of yeast in the house for
    baking the same product.

    >
    > My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    > if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    > ye?
    >
    > nb


    Could be. At this altitude yeast not rising fast enough is rarely a
    problem though

  18. #18
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines



    notbob wrote:
    >
    > On 2009-05-30, Tracy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > If you can get it, get some vital wheat gluten. It will help.

    >
    > That's what cshenk keeps telling me. So far, I've yet to find any.
    >
    > nb


    Whole Foods and places like that sell it. It won't help with the rising
    though but does improve the texture of bread machine bread.

  19. #19
    Arri London Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines



    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > On Sat, 30 May 2009 01:47:31 GMT, "brooklyn1"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"notbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > >news:[email protected]..
    > >> I'm gonna try another loaf of wheat bread in my machine. The manual
    > >> recommends "fast rising yeast", only. I got none. I have Fleshy's
    > >> "active
    > >> dry yeast". My question is, would it be ok to activate the yeast in the
    > >> measured water I'm going to add per the recipe. At least it would be
    > >> working
    > >> going in. Hard to get faster than that.
    > >>
    > >> My first attempt tasted good, but it was a pretty dense loaf, exactly like
    > >> if the yeast didn't act fast enough and never had time to rise. What say
    > >> ye?
    > >>
    > >>

    > >I *always* proof yeast.... like why wouldn't anyone not.
    > >

    >
    > When using properly stored instant yeast, proofing is totally
    > unnecessary and a complete waste of time.
    >
    > Ross.


    Why is proofing yeast a waste of time? It does its thing while one is
    measuring out the rest of the ingredients.

  20. #20
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: yeast for bread machines

    On 2009-05-31, Arri London <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Whole Foods and places like that sell it. It won't help with the rising
    > though but does improve the texture of bread machine bread.


    I'm waaaay out in the boonies of the CO Rockies. Three stores in two towns.
    A small Kroger's, an absurd Safeway, and a Walmart supercenter. Pretty
    limited on choices, even at WM. I'll check our pretty good health/organic
    store.

    nb

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