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Thread: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

  1. #1
    Landon Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 10:54:34 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    >Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    >the scales from going everywhere. But now at the end of the
    >show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. Would
    >it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    >the skin and scales from the cooked fish?


    Sometimes some pretty nasty stuff is held under the scales even after
    cleaning well. Bacteria and other things that could flavor the end
    product after cooking.

    Its always wise to scale the fish and then wash it again before adding
    it to your pan or grill.

    Cooking with the skin on adds quite a bit of flavor to the cooked
    dish. Leaving the head on will also add a lot of flavor to the fish
    meat during cooking.

    The head fat is delicious by-the-way, and can be added to any broth or
    sauce that is made from the dish.

  2. #2
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Apr 2, 11:54*am, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    > I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > the scales from going everywhere. *But now at the end of the
    > show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. *Would
    > it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > the skin and scales from the cooked fish?


    Try it and you'll understand why.

  3. #3
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Apr 2, 11:09*am, Chemo the Clown <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Apr 2, 11:54*am, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net> wrote:
    >
    > > I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > > Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > > the scales from going everywhere. *But now at the end of the
    > > show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. *Would
    > > it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > > the skin and scales from the cooked fish?

    >
    > Try it and you'll understand why.


    LOL! yes indeed. blech.

  4. #4
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 10:54:34 -0800, Mark Thorson wrote:

    > I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > the scales from going everywhere. But now at the end of the
    > show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. Would
    > it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > the skin and scales from the cooked fish?


    The scales could flake off and get all over the cooked fish. Do you
    want to rinse the fish after cooking it?

    -sw

  5. #5
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    Landon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 10:54:34 -0800, Mark Thorson <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    >>Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    >>the scales from going everywhere. But now at the end of the
    >>show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. Would
    >>it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    >>the skin and scales from the cooked fish?

    >
    > Sometimes some pretty nasty stuff is held under the scales even after
    > cleaning well. Bacteria and other things that could flavor the end
    > product after cooking.
    >
    > Its always wise to scale the fish and then wash it again before adding
    > it to your pan or grill.
    >
    > Cooking with the skin on adds quite a bit of flavor to the cooked
    > dish. Leaving the head on will also add a lot of flavor to the fish
    > meat during cooking.
    >
    > The head fat is delicious by-the-way, and can be added to any broth or
    > sauce that is made from the dish.



    We'd scale the king salmon after fishing the Pacific ocean, heading in
    across the San Francisco bay to the Berkeley pier. The process drew a
    wealth of seagulls, almost blackening the sky. We cooked the filets pan
    fried in butter with the skin on, which slid off after cooking.

    First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled one
    on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He showed
    why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded your head
    off, given the chance!!!

    Tasty! ))

    Andy

  6. #6
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On 2011-04-02, Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote:

    > it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > the skin and scales from the cooked fish?


    Some fish, like carp, have very large/thick scales. Leaving them on
    is like trying to skin a dead crusade knight while he's still wearing
    his armour. Baking an unscaled fish may get you a curly scales.

    nb

  7. #7
    Landon Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 13:22:49 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled one
    >on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He showed
    >why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded your head
    >off, given the chance!!!
    >
    >Tasty! ))
    >
    >Andy


    Dang man! These ain't what I would call "Needle Teeth"....

    http://s1135.photobucket.com/albums/...King-Teeth.jpg

  8. #8
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    the scales from going everywhere. But now at the end of the
    show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. Would
    it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    the skin and scales from the cooked fish?



  9. #9
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    Landon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 13:22:49 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled
    >>one on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He
    >>showed why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded
    >>your head off, given the chance!!!
    >>
    >>Tasty! ))
    >>
    >>Andy

    >
    > Dang man! These ain't what I would call "Needle Teeth"....
    >
    > http://s1135.photobucket.com/albums/.../Photos%20for%

    20RFC/?
    > action=view&current=Salmon-King-Teeth.jpg



    Landon,

    I'd beg to differ.

    Could be old age in your photo!

    Some things you just never forget!

    Best,

    Andy



  10. #10
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On 4/2/2011 1:54 PM, Mark Thorson wrote:
    > I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > the scales from going everywhere. But now at the end of the
    > show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. Would
    > it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > the skin and scales from the cooked fish?
    >
    >

    Skin is usually left on to provide more flavor, scaling it keeps other
    flavors from permeating the meat. I was taught by my father to do the
    same thing about 65 years ago and, as far as I know, people who catch
    their own fish do the same thing.

    The only time I leave scales on a fish to be cooked with the skin on is
    when I grill them outside, the fire takes care of the off flavor and
    generally removes the scales as the fish cooks.

  11. #11
    Landon Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 14:12:09 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Landon <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 13:22:49 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled
    >>>one on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He
    >>>showed why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded
    >>>your head off, given the chance!!!
    >>>
    >>>Tasty! ))
    >>>
    >>>Andy

    >>
    >> Dang man! These ain't what I would call "Needle Teeth"....
    >>
    >> http://s1135.photobucket.com/albums/.../Photos%20for%

    >20RFC/?
    >> action=view&current=Salmon-King-Teeth.jpg

    >
    >
    >Landon,
    >
    >I'd beg to differ.
    >
    >Could be old age in your photo!
    >
    >Some things you just never forget!
    >
    >Best,
    >
    >Andy
    >


    My old age or the fishes? hahahaahaha

  12. #12
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    Landon <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 14:12:09 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Landon <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 13:22:49 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled
    >>>>one on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He
    >>>>showed why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded
    >>>>your head off, given the chance!!!
    >>>>
    >>>>Tasty! ))
    >>>>
    >>>>Andy
    >>>
    >>> Dang man! These ain't what I would call "Needle Teeth"....
    >>>
    >>> http://s1135.photobucket.com/albums/.../Photos%20for%

    >>20RFC/?
    >>> action=view&current=Salmon-King-Teeth.jpg

    >>
    >>
    >>Landon,
    >>
    >>I'd beg to differ.
    >>
    >>Could be old age in your photo!
    >>
    >>Some things you just never forget!
    >>
    >>Best,
    >>
    >>Andy
    >>

    >
    > My old age or the fishes? hahahaahaha



    <VBG>

    Best,

    Andy

  13. #13
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Apr 2, 11:22*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    > Landon <lan...@noreply.com> wrote:
    > > On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 10:54:34 -0800, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net>
    > > wrote:

    >
    > >>I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > >>Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > >>the scales from going everywhere. *But now at the end of the
    > >>show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. *Would
    > >>it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > >>the skin and scales from the cooked fish?

    >
    > > Sometimes some pretty nasty stuff is held under the scales even after
    > > cleaning well. Bacteria and other things that could flavor the end
    > > product after cooking.

    >
    > > Its always wise to scale the fish and then wash it again before adding
    > > it to your pan or grill.

    >
    > > Cooking with the skin on adds quite a bit of flavor to the cooked
    > > dish. Leaving the head on will also add a lot of flavor to the fish
    > > meat during cooking.

    >
    > > The head fat is delicious by-the-way, and can be added to any broth or
    > > sauce that is made from the dish.

    >
    > We'd scale the king salmon after fishing the Pacific ocean, heading in
    > across the San Francisco bay to the Berkeley pier. The process drew a
    > wealth of seagulls, almost blackening the sky. We cooked the filets pan
    > fried in butter with the skin on, which slid off after cooking.
    >
    > First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled one
    > on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He showed
    > why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded your head
    > off, given the chance!!!
    >
    > Tasty! ))
    >
    > Andy


    I fish for salmon and they don't have hundreds of needle fish. Again
    you don't have a clue.

  14. #14
    Chemo the Clown Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Apr 2, 2:25*pm, Chemo the Clown <bhansen1...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > On Apr 2, 11:22*am, Andy <a...@b.c> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > Landon <lan...@noreply.com> wrote:
    > > > On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 10:54:34 -0800, Mark Thorson <nos...@sonic.net>
    > > > wrote:

    >
    > > >>I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > > >>Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > > >>the scales from going everywhere. *But now at the end of the
    > > >>show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. *Would
    > > >>it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > > >>the skin and scales from the cooked fish?

    >
    > > > Sometimes some pretty nasty stuff is held under the scales even after
    > > > cleaning well. Bacteria and other things that could flavor the end
    > > > product after cooking.

    >
    > > > Its always wise to scale the fish and then wash it again before adding
    > > > it to your pan or grill.

    >
    > > > Cooking with the skin on adds quite a bit of flavor to the cooked
    > > > dish. Leaving the head on will also add a lot of flavor to the fish
    > > > meat during cooking.

    >
    > > > The head fat is delicious by-the-way, and can be added to any broth or
    > > > sauce that is made from the dish.

    >
    > > We'd scale the king salmon after fishing the Pacific ocean, heading in
    > > across the San Francisco bay to the Berkeley pier. The process drew a
    > > wealth of seagulls, almost blackening the sky. We cooked the filets pan
    > > fried in butter with the skin on, which slid off after cooking.

    >
    > > First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled one
    > > on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He showed
    > > why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded your head
    > > off, given the chance!!!

    >
    > > Tasty! ))

    >
    > > Andy

    >
    > I fish for salmon and they don't have hundreds of needle fish. Again
    > you don't have a clue.


    I meant needle teeth.

  15. #15
    Dan Abel Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Landon <[email protected]> wrote:


    > >Landon <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 13:22:49 -0500, Andy <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >>>First time out I was taken quite by surprise when the BUM!!! pulled
    > >>>one on board and slammed it on the head with a 2x4 plank of wood. He
    > >>>showed why. They have hundreds of needle teeth! Could have shredded
    > >>>your head off, given the chance!!!


    > >> Dang man! These ain't what I would call "Needle Teeth"....
    > >>
    > >> http://s1135.photobucket.com/albums/.../Photos%20for%

    > >20RFC/?
    > >> action=view&current=Salmon-King-Teeth.jpg


    > My old age or the fishes? hahahaahaha


    I was reading an account of a fishing trip in South America. The men
    operating the boat were bare footed, and one was missing a big toe.
    When asked, he said that he had caught a piranha some years back, and it
    was flopping around in the bottom of the boat. He got too close, and
    the piranha took his toe right off!

    --
    Dan Abel
    Petaluma, California USA
    [email protected]

  16. #16
    I'm back. Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    Mark Thorson <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]:

    > I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > the scales from going everywhere. But now at the end of the
    > show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. Would
    > it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > the skin and scales from the cooked fish?
    >
    >
    >





    If the fish is cooked with the scales on, and being prepared for the table by
    having the skin removed, there's always the finnicky bit of picking scales
    off the fless when they fall off and get stuck.

    Scaling first alleviates that problem.



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    Nothing ever truely dies
    the Universe wastes nothing
    everything is simply... transformed

  17. #17
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 23:52:27 GMT, "I'm back."
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Mark Thorson wrote:
    >
    >> I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    >> Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    >> the scales from going everywhere. But now at the end of the
    >> show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. Would
    >> it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    >> the skin and scales from the cooked fish?


    Naturally you'd cook a chicken without plucking.















  18. #18
    notbob Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On 2011-04-03, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    > Naturally you'd cook a chicken without plucking.


    Oh, shut the Hell up!!

    Yer not even here and you're causing an argument!

    (granted. a great one! To bad yer missing it)

    nb

  19. #19
    ItsJoanNotJoann Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    On Apr 2, 8:11*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    > On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 23:52:27 GMT, "I'm back."
    >
    > <Auss...@home.upstairs.in.brisbane> wrote:
    > >Mark Thorson wrote:

    >
    > >> I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    > >> Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    > >> the scales from going everywhere. *But now at the end of the
    > >> show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. *Would
    > >> it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    > >> the skin and scales from the cooked fish?

    >
    > Naturally you'd cook a chicken without plucking.


    >
    >

    S******.

  20. #20
    I'm back. Guest

    Default Re: Why scale a fish to be skinned?

    ItsJoanNotJoann <[email protected]> wrote in news:36c005e2-e8fd-
    [email protected]:

    > On Apr 2, 8:11*pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >> On Sat, 02 Apr 2011 23:52:27 GMT, "I'm back."
    >>
    >> <Auss...@home.upstairs.in.brisbane> wrote:
    >> >Mark Thorson wrote:

    >>
    >> >> I'm watching a show with Julia and Jacques, and at the beginning
    >> >> Jacques shows how to scale a fish in a big plastic bag to keep
    >> >> the scales from going everywhere. *But now at the end of the
    >> >> show, the skin of the cooked fish is being removed. *Would
    >> >> it not be simpler to cook the fish without scaling, then remove
    >> >> the skin and scales from the cooked fish?

    >>
    >> Naturally you'd cook a chicken without plucking.

    >
    >>
    >>

    > S******.
    >




    Eckchewly..... I have had a chicken that was cooked without
    plucking/gutting etc. Along with a lambs head, fur intact.

    They were both boiled for a bit, and chucked into a container with the
    veges, soup, and dessert... 3 course meal in one box :-)

    It was a phase of a course that I was doing at the time, called 'Lucky
    Dip'.



    --
    Peter Lucas
    Hobart
    Tasmania

    Nothing ever truely dies
    the Universe wastes nothing
    everything is simply... transformed

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