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Thread: Why does meat with bones taste better?

  1. #1
    Malcom \Mal\ Reynolds Guest

    Default Why does meat with bones taste better?

    Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding
    meet.

    So if it's the marrow that makes the ribs taste better, would adding bone marrow
    to lower fat content ground beef make it taste better (cooked) than a ground
    beef with a higher fat content?

    And where would you acquire bone marrow by the pound?

  2. #2
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding
    > meet.
    >
    > So if it's the marrow that makes the ribs taste better, would adding bone marrow
    > to lower fat content ground beef make it taste better (cooked) than a ground
    > beef with a higher fat content?
    >
    > And where would you acquire bone marrow by the pound?


    You could experiment by buying beef soup bones. You can dig out the marrow.

    Greg

  3. #3
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Saturday, September 15, 2012 10:19:37 PM UTC-5, gregz wrote:
    > "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding

    >
    > > meet.

    >
    > >

    >
    > > So if it's the marrow that makes the ribs taste better, would adding bone marrow

    >
    > > to lower fat content ground beef make it taste better (cooked) than a ground

    >
    > > beef with a higher fat content?

    >
    > >

    >
    > > And where would you acquire bone marrow by the pound?

    >
    >
    >
    > You could experiment by buying beef soup bones. You can dig out the marrow.
    >

    I like bone-in steaks because I like chewing the meat off the bones. I don't much like the flavor of marrow.
    >
    > Greg


    --Bryan

  4. #4
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:
    >
    >Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding
    >meet.


    Where did you find that, show and tell.

    Of course that's total BS, beef steak bones don't contain enough
    marrow to make any difference, nor does the marrow pass through the
    bone. Bones add *some* flavor from the connective tissue/collogen
    between the bone and flesh breaking down but not really enough to make
    any noticeable difference or folks wouldn't love ribeye steaks.
    Bone-in meat typically stays more moist, so long as not over cooked.
    The bone-in center cut pork loin roast I cooked last night turned out
    fantastic... I wouldn't bother with the same cut with the bones
    removed... and be sure to have the butcher saw through each rib or
    you'll have a hell of a time serving. Left overs from the fridge:
    http://i49.tinypic.com/35jkvh4.jpg

  5. #5
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    Bwrrrryan wrote:
    >
    >I like chewing the meat off the bones.


    We knew that. LOL

  6. #6
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 10:18:33 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

    >"Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:
    >>
    >>Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding
    >>meet.

    >
    >Where did you find that, show and tell.
    >
    >Of course that's total BS, beef steak bones don't contain enough
    >marrow to make any difference, nor does the marrow pass through the
    >bone. Bones add *some* flavor from the connective tissue/collogen
    >between the bone and flesh breaking down but not really enough to make
    >any noticeable difference or folks wouldn't love ribeye steaks.

    ....

    How much to you know about bones, there, Dr Osteopath? ;-) Or collagen
    and connective tissue? Ever take A&P I and II? I did! Got A's in both
    too! ;-)

    John Kuthe...

  7. #7
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 15:26:07 -0500, John Kuthe <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 10:18:33 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >
    > >"Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:
    > >>
    > >>Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding
    > >>meet.

    > >
    > >Where did you find that, show and tell.
    > >
    > >Of course that's total BS, beef steak bones don't contain enough
    > >marrow to make any difference, nor does the marrow pass through the
    > >bone. Bones add *some* flavor from the connective tissue/collogen
    > >between the bone and flesh breaking down but not really enough to make
    > >any noticeable difference or folks wouldn't love ribeye steaks.

    > ...
    >
    > How much to you know about bones, there, Dr Osteopath? ;-) Or collagen
    > and connective tissue? Ever take A&P I and II? I did! Got A's in both
    > too! ;-)
    >

    I think he's right. Those who prefer their meat with bones in it are
    just making up why. It's okay for them to say they prefer it that way
    or (egad & gasp) just admit it costs less per pound, but stop with the
    stupid justification games.

    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  8. #8
    Malcom \Mal\ Reynolds Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    In article
    <[email protected].org>,
    gregz <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the
    > > surrounding
    > > meet.
    > >
    > > So if it's the marrow that makes the ribs taste better, would adding bone
    > > marrow
    > > to lower fat content ground beef make it taste better (cooked) than a
    > > ground
    > > beef with a higher fat content?
    > >
    > > And where would you acquire bone marrow by the pound?

    >
    > You could experiment by buying beef soup bones. You can dig out the marrow.
    >
    > Greg


    yeh, that was the first thought. I live near a strangely huge Korean Market that
    carry's all sorts of strange products and cuts of meat/poultry...thought I might
    give them a try

  9. #9
    Malcom \Mal\ Reynolds Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1>
    wrote:

    > "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:
    > >
    > >Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the
    > >surrounding
    > >meet.

    >
    > Where did you find that, show and tell.


    http://www.americastestkitchen.com/e...hp?docid=35186

    around the 4.5 minute mark



    >
    > Of course that's total BS, beef steak bones don't contain enough
    > marrow to make any difference, nor does the marrow pass through the
    > bone. Bones add *some* flavor from the connective tissue/collogen
    > between the bone and flesh breaking down but not really enough to make
    > any noticeable difference or folks wouldn't love ribeye steaks.
    > Bone-in meat typically stays more moist, so long as not over cooked.
    > The bone-in center cut pork loin roast I cooked last night turned out
    > fantastic... I wouldn't bother with the same cut with the bones
    > removed... and be sure to have the butcher saw through each rib or
    > you'll have a hell of a time serving. Left overs from the fridge:
    > http://i49.tinypic.com/35jkvh4.jpg


  10. #10
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On 16/09/2012 6:54 PM, sf wrote:

    > I think he's right. Those who prefer their meat with bones in it are
    > just making up why. It's okay for them to say they prefer it that way
    > or (egad & gasp) just admit it costs less per pound, but stop with the
    > stupid justification games.
    >



    I won't pretend to know why meat on the bone tastes better, but I sure
    to agree that it does.

    FWIW, we just had an incredible beef rib roast dinner. I picked up a 5
    lb roast on sale a few days ago and we had it tonight. It was the best
    roast beef I have had in years, and I had nothing to do with it other
    than buying it. I prefer my beef rare and this one ended up medium
    well, but it was the most tender, juicy tasty beef that I have had in years.

  11. #11
    gregz Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 15:26:07 -0500, John Kuthe <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 10:18:33 -0400, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:
    >>
    >>> "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>> Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding
    >>>> meet.
    >>>
    >>> Where did you find that, show and tell.
    >>>
    >>> Of course that's total BS, beef steak bones don't contain enough
    >>> marrow to make any difference, nor does the marrow pass through the
    >>> bone. Bones add *some* flavor from the connective tissue/collogen
    >>> between the bone and flesh breaking down but not really enough to make
    >>> any noticeable difference or folks wouldn't love ribeye steaks.

    >> ...
    >>
    >> How much to you know about bones, there, Dr Osteopath? ;-) Or collagen
    >> and connective tissue? Ever take A&P I and II? I did! Got A's in both
    >> too! ;-)
    >>

    > I think he's right. Those who prefer their meat with bones in it are
    > just making up why. It's okay for them to say they prefer it that way
    > or (egad & gasp) just admit it costs less per pound, but stop with the
    > stupid justification games.



    Perhaps we all know, when you get done cutting it up, you know when you
    pick up the bone, it's the best part.

    Greg

  12. #12
    Tommy Joe Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Sep 15, 11:12*pm, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" <atlas-
    bug...@invalid.invalid> wrote:


    > Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the surrounding
    > meet.
    >
    > So if it's the marrow that makes the ribs taste better, would adding bonemarrow
    > to lower fat content ground beef make it taste better (cooked) than a ground
    > beef with a higher fat content?
    >
    > And where would you acquire bone marrow by the pound?



    It's interesting how cooking and chemistry are so closely related,
    especially as you approach it. Interesting. I am not disputing the
    marrow influence on taste, but I wonder if liking meat off the bone
    does not produce a caveman satisfaction similar to the one gets from
    ripping clams out of the shell and eating them, or from tearing apart
    crab legs or crushing lobsters shells. I used to put away 30 or 40
    steamed clams at a sitting, which is not much if you take the shells
    out of the picture. I don't think many people would enjoy eating 3
    dozen raw or steamed clams piled onto a plate with not shells on
    them. I guess in some ways attacking a hunk of meat with a bone on it
    is a big man's subtle admittance to the wanton desire to suck a
    penis. Just kidding. I do think there is a caveman satisfaction to
    eating meat from the bone though - about as close as we can get to
    chasing down a living creature and eating it alive as it struggles to
    get free.

    It's a caveman thing,
    TJ

  13. #13
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 16:14:14 -0700, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the
    >> >surrounding
    >> >meet.

    >>
    >> Where did you find that, show and tell.

    >
    >http://www.americastestkitchen.com/e...hp?docid=35186
    >
    >around the 4.5 minute mark


    Acording to their own words the potatoes would become inedible before
    any flavor permated the bone... and anyway pork rib bones contain an
    infintesimal quantity of marrow. That's the same pork roast I made
    yesterday, and they agreed with me, that roast with the bones left on
    add fat, colagen, and make for a moister roast but not a more
    flavorful roast... if you want more flavorful use herbs/spices...
    those pinheads added only salt, not a good way to season that cut of
    pork... with the correct herbs/spices salt is totally unnecesary... in
    fact it's best not to salt a center cut pork loin because it's a
    relatively dry cut and salt draws out moisture, it's best to salt
    after it's served, as each person desires. When you prove to me that
    you cooked that cut then maybe I'll give you some credit but as of now
    everything you say has the value of used TP.

    >> Of course that's total BS, beef steak bones don't contain enough
    >> marrow to make any difference, nor does the marrow pass through the
    >> bone. Bones add *some* flavor from the connective tissue/collogen
    >> between the bone and flesh breaking down but not really enough to make
    >> any noticeable difference or folks wouldn't love ribeye steaks.
    >> Bone-in meat typically stays more moist, so long as not over cooked.
    >> The bone-in center cut pork loin roast I cooked last night turned out
    >> fantastic... I wouldn't bother with the same cut with the bones
    >> removed... and be sure to have the butcher saw through each rib or
    >> you'll have a hell of a time serving. Left overs from the fridge:
    >> http://i49.tinypic.com/35jkvh4.jpg


  14. #14
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 19:17:34 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 16/09/2012 6:54 PM, sf wrote:
    >
    >> I think he's right. Those who prefer their meat with bones in it are
    >> just making up why. It's okay for them to say they prefer it that way
    >> or (egad & gasp) just admit it costs less per pound, but stop with the
    >> stupid justification games.
    >>

    >
    >
    >I won't pretend to know why meat on the bone tastes better, but I sure
    >to agree that it does.
    >
    >FWIW, we just had an incredible beef rib roast dinner. I picked up a 5
    >lb roast on sale a few days ago and we had it tonight. It was the best
    >roast beef I have had in years, and I had nothing to do with it other
    >than buying it. I prefer my beef rare and this one ended up medium
    >well, but it was the most tender, juicy tasty beef that I have had in years.


    On usenet anyone can very conveniently claim they just did something
    (you do that a lot), but unless you prove it your words have the value
    of used TP. Actually I don't believe you have a kitchen, you live in
    a carton under a bridge.

  15. #15
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    gregz wrote:
    >
    >you know when you pick up the bone it's the best part.


    That's what she said.

  16. #16
    Malcom \Mal\ Reynolds Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1>
    wrote:

    > On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 16:14:14 -0700, "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1
    > ><Gravesend1>
    > >wrote:
    > >
    > >> "Malcom \"Mal\" Reynolds" wrote:
    > >> >
    > >> >Found out today that it's the bone marrow that slowly seeps into the
    > >> >surrounding
    > >> >meet.
    > >>
    > >> Where did you find that, show and tell.

    > >
    > >http://www.americastestkitchen.com/e...hp?docid=35186
    > >
    > >around the 4.5 minute mark

    >
    > Acording to their own words the potatoes would become inedible before
    > any flavor permated the bone


    they don't mention a cooking time, at least for the potatos



    .... and anyway pork rib bones contain an
    > infintesimal quantity of marrow. That's the same pork roast I made
    > yesterday, and they agreed with me, that roast with the bones left on
    > add fat, colagen, and make for a moister roast but not a more
    > flavorful roast


    the above test removed all of the fat and collagen from the bones, so if a blind
    test overwhelmingly chose the potatos cooked with bones in it, the bones must
    add something.

    Anything is possible, but if you want to quibble with them about their
    methodology, keep us informed



    .... if you want more flavorful use herbs/spices...
    > those pinheads added only salt, not a good way to season that cut of
    > pork... with the correct herbs/spices salt is totally unnecesary... in
    > fact it's best not to salt a center cut pork loin because it's a
    > relatively dry cut and salt draws out moisture, it's best to salt
    > after it's served, as each person desires. When you prove to me that
    > you cooked that cut then maybe I'll give you some credit but as of now
    > everything you say has the value of used TP.
    >
    > >> Of course that's total BS, beef steak bones don't contain enough
    > >> marrow to make any difference, nor does the marrow pass through the
    > >> bone. Bones add *some* flavor from the connective tissue/collogen
    > >> between the bone and flesh breaking down but not really enough to make
    > >> any noticeable difference or folks wouldn't love ribeye steaks.
    > >> Bone-in meat typically stays more moist, so long as not over cooked.
    > >> The bone-in center cut pork loin roast I cooked last night turned out
    > >> fantastic... I wouldn't bother with the same cut with the bones
    > >> removed... and be sure to have the butcher saw through each rib or
    > >> you'll have a hell of a time serving. Left overs from the fridge:
    > >> http://i49.tinypic.com/35jkvh4.jpg



    --

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  17. #17
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Mon, 17 Sep 2012 00:46:23 +0000 (UTC), gregz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>

    > > I think he's right. Those who prefer their meat with bones in it are
    > > just making up why. It's okay for them to say they prefer it that way
    > > or (egad & gasp) just admit it costs less per pound, but stop with the
    > > stupid justification games.

    >
    >
    > Perhaps we all know, when you get done cutting it up, you know when you
    > pick up the bone, it's the best part.
    >

    I wish people would just *say* they like chewing on the bone instead
    of trying to convince everyone that bony meat tastes different when it
    doesn't.


    --
    Food is an important part of a balanced diet.

  18. #18
    Ed Pawlowski Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 22:43:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:



    >>
    >>
    >> Perhaps we all know, when you get done cutting it up, you know when you
    >> pick up the bone, it's the best part.
    >>

    >I wish people would just *say* they like chewing on the bone instead
    >of trying to convince everyone that bony meat tastes different when it
    >doesn't.


    It certainly cooks up different. The meat near the bone has a better
    texture than the rest because of the heat transfer differences near
    the bone.

    I'll take a bone in center cut chop any day over the boneless loin.

  19. #19
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 22:43:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:
    ....
    >I wish people would just *say* they like chewing on the bone instead
    >of trying to convince everyone that bony meat tastes different when it
    >doesn't.


    Bryan DID say that: "...I like chewing the meat off the bones."

    John Kuthe...

  20. #20
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Why does meat with bones taste better?

    On 9/17/2012 5:59 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:
    > On Sun, 16 Sep 2012 22:43:06 -0700, sf <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> I wish people would just *say* they like chewing on the bone instead
    >> of trying to convince everyone that bony meat tastes different when it
    >> doesn't.

    >
    > It certainly cooks up different. The meat near the bone has a better
    > texture than the rest because of the heat transfer differences near
    > the bone.


    On some level, I guess I noticed that when I was a kid. I'd
    always cut off the part of the chop that wasn't near the bone
    and eat that first, saving the meat near the bone for last.
    I remember asking here if the meat tasted better on the bone
    because I put 2 and 2 together at dinner. A moment of observation.

    As an adult, when I ordered prime rib out, I couldn't eat the whole
    thing so I'd cut off the roundish part not touching the bone and
    save to to take home for steak sandwiches and eat my favorite part,
    the part around the bone.

    I most certainly did NOT pick up the huge beef bone and gnaw on
    it in the restaurant! That has nothing to do with it. If I could
    get that flavor without the hassle of cutting around the bone, I'd
    be happy. That's not how it works.

    > I'll take a bone in center cut chop any day over the boneless loin.


    Ditto, I don't like boneless pork chops unless they have a sauce or
    something for flavor. To my dismay, it's been hard to find bone-in
    pork roasts for a while now.

    You know the old saying, the closer to the bone, the sweeter the meat.
    (cue bad jokes) Heh.

    nancy


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