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Thread: white folk's soul food

  1. #1
    bulka Guest

    Default white folk's soul food

    Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. "Splendid Table" I think.

    In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    your kitchen. White and no money, you were down eating with your
    black neighbors. It's all good. Bring on the beans.

    B

  2. #2
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mar 22, 2:46*pm, bulka <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. *"Splendid Table" I think.
    >
    > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    > your kitchen. *White and no money, you were down eating with your
    > black neighbors. *It's all good. *Bring on the beans.
    >
    > B


    true......or you were down in the kitchen learning from your black
    cook or in the neighbors kitchen askin questions...

  3. #3
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food


    On 22-Mar-2010, bulka <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. "Splendid Table" I think.
    >
    > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    > your kitchen. White and no money, you were down eating with your
    > black neighbors. It's all good. Bring on the beans.
    >
    > B


    It was on Splendid Table; the guy was Frederick Opie, touting his book Hog
    and Hominy.

    I don't know about where and when he was from, but, in the western Kentucky
    of my 1950s youth poor whites were not neighbors of poor blacks. Things
    were about as segregated as you could get. The food he talks about has
    always been the food of poor folks, regardless of race; it was the cast-offs
    and found food. My grandparents on both sides were poor; paternal side were
    share-croppers, maternal were field-hands and cooks for field-hands. When
    hog butchering time came, my family got the snout, jowls, feet, offal, etc
    while the rest went to folks who could afford better. Poor folks ate what
    they could grow, forage, catch or shoot; squirrel, rabbit, 'possum, field
    greens, wild berries, etc.

    I still enjoy the food of my youth and often buy greens (collard mostly),
    smoked hog jowl, shanks, hocks, etc. Almost without fail, when an
    African-American checker sees my groceries, they'll comment about why I have
    "soul food". I tell them that you don't have to be black to have been poor
    and "soul food" is just what African-Americans call the food of the poor.
    It the same stuff my grandmother used to call "poor do" - when you're poor,
    you do the best you can with what you get. "What's for lunch, Grandma?"
    "Jus' poor-do, but it'll fill yer belly." And, it was always mighty tasty;
    even the vinegar pie.

    My "poor do" this week will be a pot of pinto beans, with smoked shanks,
    buttermilk cornbread and awesome collard greens.

    "Poor do" it's "soul food" for the pale.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  4. #4
    bulka Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food


    > "Poor do" it's "soul food" for the pale.


    A great line.


  5. #5
    Food SnobŪ Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mar 22, 5:53*pm, "l, not -l" <lal...@cujo.com> wrote:
    > On 22-Mar-2010, bulka <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. *"Splendid Table" I think.

    >
    > > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    > > your kitchen. *White and no money, you were down eating with your
    > > black neighbors. *It's all good. *Bring on the beans.

    >
    > > B

    >
    > It was on Splendid Table; the guy was Frederick Opie, touting his book Hog
    > and Hominy.


    LRK seems like she'd eat almost anything. She compliments the most
    horrid concoctions.
    >
    > I don't know about where and when he was from, but, in the western Kentucky
    > of my 1950s youth poor whites were not neighbors of poor blacks. *Things
    > were about as segregated as you could get. *The food he talks about has
    > always been the food of poor folks, regardless of race; it was the cast-offs
    > and found food. *My grandparents on both sides were poor; paternal sidewere
    > share-croppers, maternal were field-hands and cooks for field-hands. *When
    > hog butchering time came, my family got the snout, jowls, feet, offal, etc
    > while the rest went to folks who could afford better. *Poor folks ate what
    > they could grow, forage, catch or shoot; squirrel, rabbit, 'possum, field
    > greens, wild berries, etc.
    >
    > I still enjoy the food of my youth and often buy greens (collard mostly),
    > smoked hog jowl, shanks, hocks, etc. *Almost without fail, when an
    > African-American checker sees my groceries, they'll comment about why I have
    > "soul food". *I tell them that you don't have to be black to have been poor
    > and "soul food" is just what African-Americans call the food of the poor.
    > It the same stuff *my grandmother used to call "poor do" - when you're poor,
    > you do the best you can with what you get. *"What's for lunch, Grandma?"
    > "Jus' poor-do, but it'll fill yer belly." *And, it was always mighty tasty;
    > even the On Mar 22, 1:12*pm, notbob <not...@nothome.com> wrote:
    > On 2010-03-22, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > Total expenses for the work was $8700. I will be getting back $3100 from
    > > the government and $525 from my electricity company... $3625, dropping
    > > my cost to $5075.

    >
    > ....but, subsidized healtcare is an abomination, right!?


    America is a better place than it was yesterday at this time. I
    especially approve of the unearned income Medicare tax, and would like
    to see all "payroll" taxes applied to unearned as well as earned
    income. I still haven't come to a decision on what provocative sign I
    should make for my car.
    >
    > nb


    --Bryan.
    >
    > My "poor do" this week will be a pot of pinto beans, with smoked shanks,
    > buttermilk cornbread and awesome collard greens.
    >
    > "Poor do" it's "soul food" for the pale.
    > --
    > Change Cujo to Juno in email address.



  6. #6
    aem Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mar 22, 1:46 pm, bulka <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. "Splendid Table" I think.
    >
    > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    > your kitchen. White and no money, you were down eating with your
    > black neighbors. It's all good. Bring on the beans.
    >

    Pretty simplistic. Haves and have nots are not racial categories, and
    the food of the poor was (is) not limited to the so-called 'soul food'
    of the south. Poor Chinese Americans ate stir fries that were mostly
    vegetables, while rich ones got the meats and seafood. Poor Irish
    Americans got the cabbage and potatoes, not collard greens. Et
    cetera, etc. -aem

  7. #7
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mar 22, 3:53*pm, "l, not -l" <lal...@cujo.com> wrote
    >


    > My "poor do" this week will be a pot of pinto beans, with smoked shanks,
    > buttermilk cornbread and awesome collard greens.
    >
    > "Poor do" it's "soul food" for the pale.
    > --


    I grew up po' as well. I STILL love pinto beans cooked with onions
    and ham hocks, ladled over hot cornbread and topped with chopped onion
    and pepper relish or chow chow.

    Some people may poo poo it, but then they've never tasted it. ;-)

    dang....now I want some............

  8. #8
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. "Splendid Table" I think.
    >
    > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    > your kitchen.


    It was expected the "leftovers" went home in the tote bag.


    --
    Dimitri

    Soon

    http://kitchenguide.wordpress.com.



  9. #9
    George Shirley Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On 3/22/2010 6:42 PM, ImStillMags wrote:
    > On Mar 22, 3:53 pm, "l, not -l"<lal...@cujo.com> wrote
    >>

    >
    >> My "poor do" this week will be a pot of pinto beans, with smoked shanks,
    >> buttermilk cornbread and awesome collard greens.
    >>
    >> "Poor do" it's "soul food" for the pale.
    >> --

    >
    > I grew up po' as well. I STILL love pinto beans cooked with onions
    > and ham hocks, ladled over hot cornbread and topped with chopped onion
    > and pepper relish or chow chow.
    >
    > Some people may poo poo it, but then they've never tasted it. ;-)
    >
    > dang....now I want some............


    I've got the menu for tomorrow night ready to print. Arkansas cornbread
    (has no sugar, cornbread with sugar is cake), sweet milk, chopped
    onions, freshly ground pepper. Leftover cornbread is had for breakfast
    the next day with either 'lasses or Stine's cane syrup over it.

  10. #10
    ImStillMags Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mar 22, 5:22*pm, George Shirley <gsh...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    > On 3/22/2010 6:42 PM, ImStillMags wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Mar 22, 3:53 pm, "l, not -l"<lal...@cujo.com> *wrote

    >
    > >> My "poor do" this week will be a pot of pinto beans, with smoked shanks,
    > >> buttermilk cornbread and awesome collard greens.

    >
    > >> "Poor do" it's "soul food" for the pale.
    > >> --

    >
    > > I grew up po' as well. * *I STILL love pinto beans cooked with onions
    > > and ham hocks, ladled over hot cornbread and topped with chopped onion
    > > and pepper relish or chow chow.

    >
    > > Some people may poo poo it, but then they've never tasted it. *;-)

    >
    > > dang....now I want some............

    >
    > I've got the menu for tomorrow night ready to print. Arkansas cornbread
    > (has no sugar, cornbread with sugar is cake), sweet milk, chopped
    > onions, freshly ground pepper. Leftover cornbread is had for breakfast
    > the next day with either 'lasses or Stine's cane syrup over it.


    my mother crumbled up her leftover cornbread into a glass of
    buttermilk and ate it with a spoon like ice cream....
    Now, that's Southern for ya.

  11. #11
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    ImStillMags <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mar 22, 3:53*pm, "l, not -l" <lal...@cujo.com> wrote
    > >

    >
    > > My "poor do" this week will be a pot of pinto beans, with smoked shanks,
    > > buttermilk cornbread and awesome collard greens.
    > >
    > > "Poor do" it's "soul food" for the pale.
    > > --

    >
    > I grew up po' as well. I STILL love pinto beans cooked with onions
    > and ham hocks, ladled over hot cornbread and topped with chopped onion
    > and pepper relish or chow chow.
    >
    > Some people may poo poo it, but then they've never tasted it. ;-)
    >
    > dang....now I want some............


    My gods that sounds fantastic actually! ;-d
    --
    Peace! Om

    Web Albums: <http://picasaweb.google.com/OMPOmelet>

    "Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck." --Dalai Lama

  12. #12
    sf Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 22:53:38 GMT, "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > my family got the snout, jowls, feet, offal, etc
    > while the rest went to folks who could afford better.


    Just curious. Did your family really use the term "offal" or is that
    a term that you picked up here in rfc?

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  13. #13
    sf Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 16:42:38 -0700 (PDT), ImStillMags
    <[email protected]> wrote:
    > > --

    >
    > I grew up po' as well. I STILL love pinto beans cooked with onions
    > and ham hocks, ladled over hot cornbread and topped with chopped onion
    > and pepper relish or chow chow.
    >
    > Some people may poo poo it, but then they've never tasted it. ;-)
    >
    > dang....now I want some............


    Pinto beans with meat is over kill to me, because they taste so meaty
    to begin with.... but ladled over cornbread sounds delicious. I want
    some now!

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  14. #14
    sf Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 16:46:21 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    > > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. "Splendid Table" I think.
    > >
    > > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    > > your kitchen.

    >
    > It was expected the "leftovers" went home in the tote bag.


    I think most people here have never experienced that except through
    watching movies... and how true were those movies to the times? Not
    very true.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  15. #15
    itsjoannotjoann Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mar 22, 5:53*pm, "l, not -l" <lal...@cujo.com> wrote:
    > On 22-Mar-2010, bulka <working.artists.work...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. *"Splendid Table" I think.

    >
    > > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    > > your kitchen. *White and no money, you were down eating with your
    > > black neighbors. *It's all good. *Bring on the beans.

    >
    > > B

    >
    > It was on Splendid Table; the guy was Frederick Opie, touting his book Hog
    > and Hominy.
    >
    > I don't know about where and when he was from, but, in the western Kentucky
    > of my 1950s youth poor whites were not neighbors of poor blacks. *Things
    > were about as segregated as you could get. *The food he talks about has
    > always been the food of poor folks, regardless of race.>
    >
    >

    Nor were poor whites the neighbors of poor blacks when I was a child
    of the late 50's and 1960's. I lived in a segregate neighorhood until
    the 70's. We were poor and there were pinto or white beans on the
    table 7 days a week along with cornbread and onions. It was this way
    in every household in my neighborhood, we were ALL poor, we didn't go
    hungry, but there certainly were not any fancy vittles on the table.
    There was always plenty to eat, but it was simple fare.


  16. #16
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food


    On 22-Mar-2010, sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 22:53:38 GMT, "l, not -l" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > my family got the snout, jowls, feet, offal, etc
    > > while the rest went to folks who could afford better.

    >
    > Just curious. Did your family really use the term "offal" or is that
    > a term that you picked up here in rfc?


    It is quite unlikely family members used that term; but, I'm not sure where
    I first learned it. I suspect I knew it long before coming to usenet in the
    90s; I have been reading about cooking and watching cooking shows for 40+
    years and most likely picked it that way, long ago.
    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  17. #17
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mon 22 Mar 2010 08:27:16p, sf told us...

    > On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 16:46:21 -0700, "Dimitri" <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >> "bulka" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected].
    >> .
    >> > Heard a guy on the radio yesterday. "Splendid Table" I think.
    >> >
    >> > In the day, if you were white and had money, you had black folks in
    >> > your kitchen.

    >>
    >> It was expected the "leftovers" went home in the tote bag.

    >
    > I think most people here have never experienced that except through
    > watching movies... and how true were those movies to the times? Not
    > very true.
    >


    Most of my family members in Mississippi had "colored help" who also often
    did the cooking. Leftovers most often went home with them. I remember
    this from the 1950s and early 1960s. I know that in at least two of
    aunts' households, extra food was deliberately cooked so that there would
    be enough food to be taken.

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  18. #18
    sf Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 04:04:41 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Most of my family members in Mississippi had "colored help" who also often
    > did the cooking. Leftovers most often went home with them. I remember
    > this from the 1950s and early 1960s. I know that in at least two of
    > aunts' households, extra food was deliberately cooked so that there would
    > be enough food to be taken.


    Wayne, I think you were a rich kid compared to the rest of us who were
    merely middle class (not poor by any means)... but you were also in
    the south, so maybe that's the biggest difference.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

  19. #19
    Wayne Boatwright Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Mon 22 Mar 2010 09:18:07p, sf told us...

    > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 04:04:41 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Most of my family members in Mississippi had "colored help" who also
    >> often did the cooking. Leftovers most often went home with them. I
    >> remember this from the 1950s and early 1960s. I know that in at least
    >> two of aunts' households, extra food was deliberately cooked so that
    >> there would be enough food to be taken.

    >
    > Wayne, I think you were a rich kid compared to the rest of us who were
    > merely middle class (not poor by any means)... but you were also in
    > the south, so maybe that's the biggest difference.
    >


    sf, see my email...

    --

    ~~ If there's a nit to pick, some nitwit will pick it. ~~

    ~~ A mind is a terrible thing to lose. ~~

    ************************************************** ********

    Wayne Boatwright


  20. #20
    sf Guest

    Default Re: white folk's soul food

    On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 04:56:38 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Mon 22 Mar 2010 09:18:07p, sf told us...
    >
    > > On Tue, 23 Mar 2010 04:04:41 GMT, Wayne Boatwright
    > > <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Most of my family members in Mississippi had "colored help" who also
    > >> often did the cooking. Leftovers most often went home with them. I
    > >> remember this from the 1950s and early 1960s. I know that in at least
    > >> two of aunts' households, extra food was deliberately cooked so that
    > >> there would be enough food to be taken.

    > >
    > > Wayne, I think you were a rich kid compared to the rest of us who were
    > > merely middle class (not poor by any means)... but you were also in
    > > the south, so maybe that's the biggest difference.
    > >

    >
    > sf, see my email...


    Got it, thanks.

    --
    Forget the health food. I need all the preservatives I can get.

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