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Thread: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    What do you use?

    I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    in baked goods?

    This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. Spell it out,
    cookbook writers. (I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    doomed in the kitchen?)

  2. #2
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > in baked goods?


    Where the oil is unspecified, never use a strongly flavored
    oil like olive or sesame.

  3. #3
    Mr. Bill Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 16:35:05 -0700 (PDT), [email protected]
    wrote:

    > (I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    >doomed in the kitchen?)


    It is a personal choice...but by goodness, there is nothing better
    than a lard pie crust. Grandma couldn't have been wrong for her 75
    years of making pie!


  4. #4
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    [email protected] wrote:
    > What do you use?
    >
    > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > in baked goods?
    >
    > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. Spell it out,
    > cookbook writers. (I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > doomed in the kitchen?)



    Given the choices you have on hand you should use canola oil.

  5. #5
    Kris Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 7:35*pm, tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    > What do you use?
    >
    > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > in baked goods?
    >
    > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    > cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > doomed in the kitchen?)


    Depends on what it is. For most savory cooking, I use olive oil. For
    baking, I used vegetable oil or veg shortening (unless it calls for
    butter of course).

    Crisco is not all bad. Some baking recipes call for it because it
    makes a softer cookie, etc, etc than just butter alone. Don't rule it
    out, just buy in small quantities.

    Kris

  6. #6
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    In article
    <e19d4454-c8c6-4e35-8671-5e679120[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > What do you use?


    Canola oil. Or olive oil, although I don't bake with olive oil. Olive
    oil is in my sprtizer and in my bottle with the e-z pour spout thingy in
    it.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - good news 4-6-2009
    "What you say about someone else says more
    about you than it does about the other person."

  7. #7
    Jean B. Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    Mr. Bill wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 16:35:05 -0700 (PDT), [email protected]
    > wrote:
    >
    >> (I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    >> doomed in the kitchen?)

    >
    > It is a personal choice...but by goodness, there is nothing better
    > than a lard pie crust. Grandma couldn't have been wrong for her 75
    > years of making pie!
    >

    Oh!!!! Since I fell off the LC wagon and can now find lard, I'd
    better do my experiments very soon!!!!

    In answer to the question, light olive oil, canola oil (although
    some of it tastes nasty), macadamia nut oil, whatever oil I think
    might be beneficial.

    --
    Jean B.

  8. #8
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 6:52*pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    > > What do you use?

    >
    > > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > > in baked goods?

    >
    > > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    > > cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > > doomed in the kitchen?)

    >
    > Given the choices you have on hand you should use canola oil.



    I pretty much stopped using anything except real butter or evoo. I
    don't deep fry. If I HAD to deep fry something (or pan fry chicken in
    1 inch of oil etc) I would buy peanut or canola. I do use sesame oil
    as seasoning and I have used walnut oil. I'd like to try pistascio
    (sp!) and avocado oil. I might buy truffle oil or another flavored
    oil (garlic or chili flavored oil).
    Lynn in Fargo
    Lynn in Fargo

  9. #9
    Dan S. Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    > What do you use?
    >
    > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > in baked goods?
    >
    > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. Spell it out,
    > cookbook writers. (I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > doomed in the kitchen?)


    Vegetable oil is neutrally flavored as a rule. In some dishes, I can
    taste canola and find it fishy. But, as a rule, I use canola - and if
    I'm worried that the flavor will come through, crisco vegetable oil or
    extra virgin olive oil.

    --
    Yours,
    Dan S.
    Befuddlin' teh hope since 2009



  10. #10
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    [email protected] wrote:
    >
    >I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use?
    > What about in baked goods?
    >
    > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that.


    In baked goods nomenclature any fat is defined as shortening. For most
    baked goods solid shortening produces a far better product than liquid
    shortening... it's not possible to produce a quality cake, pie crust. or
    decent cookies with liquid shortening, even yeast bread is far better made
    with solid shortenings. When preparing pizza dough use a lump of rendered
    pork fat, olive oil in any yeast dough is wuss city. You must be strictly a
    box cake maven.



  11. #11
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 7:22*pm, Dan S.
    <danUNDERscoreGOEShereSLAUGH...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
    > > What do you use?

    >
    > > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > > in baked goods?

    >
    > > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    > > cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > > doomed in the kitchen?)

    >
    > Vegetable oil is neutrally flavored as a rule. *In some dishes, I can
    > taste canola and find it fishy. *But, as a rule, I use canola - and if
    > I'm worried that the flavor will come through, crisco vegetable oil or
    > extra virgin olive oil.
    >
    > --
    > Yours,
    > Dan S.
    > Befuddlin' teh hope since 2009


    Years ago I helped settle a family of Russian emigrants from the
    Ukraine. We stocked their kitchen with basics before they came as we
    knew their food stamps would be pretty meager. We got them in nice
    big bottle of "vegetable oil" - the store brand. They couldn't use it
    (they tried, bless 'em) but they went to the store (speaking almost no
    English) and somehow communicated that they wanted sunflower oil - who
    knew? There's a HUGE sunflower oil refinery less than 100 miles from
    Fargo . . .
    Lynn in Fargo
    PS: in less than 8 months the dad had a good job at a company that
    makes medium sized tractors. He had been an engineer in Russia.
    They put him to work, he worked on his English and within the second
    year they were sending him to the Ukraine to consult with the folks
    marketing the tractors!

  12. #12
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 6:58*pm, Kris <shanno...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    > On Apr 14, 7:35*pm, tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    >
    > > What do you use?

    >
    > > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > > in baked goods?

    >
    > > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    > > cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > > doomed in the kitchen?)

    >
    > Depends on what it is. For most savory cooking, I use olive oil. For
    > baking, I used vegetable oil or veg shortening (unless it calls for
    > butter of course).


    "Vegetable oil" means soya oil. Cheap and crappy. It's for people
    who are very poor, or who have no sense of taste.
    >
    > Crisco is not all bad. Some baking recipes call for it because it
    > makes a softer cookie, etc, etc than just butter alone. *Don't rule it
    > out, just buy in small quantities.
    >

    CRISCO IS BAD. Are you a moron, or did you just arrive in 2009 in a
    time machine?

    > Kris


    --Bryan http://www.TheBonobos.com

  13. #13
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 6:52*pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    > tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    > > What do you use?

    >
    > > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > > in baked goods?

    >
    > > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    > > cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > > doomed in the kitchen?)

    >
    > Given the choices you have on hand you should use canola oil.


    Opinions differ. Some folks perceive canola as tasteless. Others
    don't, and I'm among them. I find peanut more neutral. I think that
    most people agree that pricey safflower oil is pretty tasteless.

    So canola or peanut, depending on your taste.

    --Bryan http://www.TheBonobos.com

  14. #14
    Dan S. Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    > On Apr 14, 6:58*pm, Kris <shanno...@hotmail.com> wrote:
    >> On Apr 14, 7:35*pm, tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    >>
    >>> What do you use?

    >>
    >>> I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    >>> - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    >>> in baked goods?

    >>
    >>> This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    >>> cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    >>> doomed in the kitchen?)

    >>
    >> Depends on what it is. For most savory cooking, I use olive oil. For
    >> baking, I used vegetable oil or veg shortening (unless it calls for
    >> butter of course).

    >
    > "Vegetable oil" means soya oil. Cheap and crappy. It's for people
    > who are very poor, or who have no sense of taste.
    >>


    The Army used to use "vegetable oil." It was generally bearable in
    everything from salads to chicken gravy. I might feel differently
    since my tastes have evolved. I mainly switched for cholesterol
    purposes. Soya is higher in trans-fats than canola.


    >> Crisco is not all bad. Some baking recipes call for it because it
    >> makes a softer cookie, etc, etc than just butter alone. *Don't rule it
    >> out, just buy in small quantities.
    >>

    > CRISCO IS BAD. Are you a moron, or did you just arrive in 2009 in a
    > time machine?
    >
    >> Kris

    >
    > --Bryan http://www.TheBonobos.com


    --
    Yours,
    Dan S.
    Befuddlin' teh hope since 2009



  15. #15
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 7:22*pm, Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig <lynng...@i29.net>
    wrote:
    > On Apr 14, 6:52*pm, Dave Smith <adavid.sm...@sympatico.ca> wrote:
    >
    > > tweeny90...@mypacks.net wrote:
    > > > What do you use?

    >
    > > > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > > > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > > > in baked goods?

    >
    > > > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    > > > cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- amI
    > > > doomed in the kitchen?)

    >
    > > Given the choices you have on hand you should use canola oil.

    >
    > I pretty much stopped using anything except real butter or evoo. *I
    > don't deep fry. *If I HAD to deep fry something (or pan fry chicken in
    > 1 inch of oil etc) I would buy peanut *or canola. *I do use sesame oil
    > as seasoning and I have used walnut oil. *I'd like to try pistascio
    > (sp!) and avocado oil. *I might *buy truffle oil or another flavored
    > oil (garlic or chili flavored oil).


    I'm exactly with you, except I do fry a lot, so I buy peanut oil by
    the gallon. Olive, peanut and canola are all very healthy fats.
    Butter, not so much, but what it lacks in healthfulness, it makes up
    in deliciousness. The only truly good sub for "shortening" is non-
    hydrogenated lard. Palm oil does not taste as good as lard. Butter
    has too much moisture for some applications.

    > Lynn in Fargo


    --Bryan http://www.TheBonobos.com

  16. #16
    Becca Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    Jean B. wrote:
    > Mr. Bill wrote:
    >> On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 16:35:05 -0700 (PDT), [email protected]
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> (I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    >>> doomed in the kitchen?)

    >>
    >> It is a personal choice...but by goodness, there is nothing better
    >> than a lard pie crust. Grandma couldn't have been wrong for her 75
    >> years of making pie!
    >>

    > Oh!!!! Since I fell off the LC wagon and can now find lard, I'd
    > better do my experiments very soon!!!!
    >
    > In answer to the question, light olive oil, canola oil (although some
    > of it tastes nasty), macadamia nut oil, whatever oil I think might be
    > beneficial.
    >


    Since I fell of the LC wagon, I've had so much fun. :-) It is
    Mr. Bill's fault, for posting that Louisiana Butter Pecan Coffee Cake
    recipe. I thought I was misbehaving when I made fruit salad. lol


    Becca

  17. #17
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 18:02:21 -0700 (PDT), Bobo Bonobo®
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    Butter
    >has too much moisture for some applications.


    Unless you get one of the European type butters, such as Plugra. It
    has less moisture.

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  18. #18
    Miche Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    In article
    <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] wrote:

    > What do you use?
    >
    > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > in baked goods?


    Depends on whether the flavour of the oil is going to make a big
    difference to the flavour of the final product.

    > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. Spell it out,
    > cookbook writers. (I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- am I
    > doomed in the kitchen?)


    You never see "shortening" in NZ recipes -- if a hard fat is called for,
    the type is specified.

    Miche

    --
    Electricians do it in three phases

  19. #19
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 7:34*pm, Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig <lynng...@i29.net>
    wrote:
    > On Apr 14, 7:22*pm, Dan S.
    >
    >
    >
    > <danUNDERscoreGOEShereSLAUGH...@sbcglobal.net> wrote:
    > > > What do you use?

    >
    > > > I have grapeseed, canola, olive, sesame on hand, but always hesitate
    > > > - do you have some kind of guideline as to what you'll use? What about
    > > > in baked goods?

    >
    > > > This is almost as bad as 'shortening' - I hate that. *Spell it out,
    > > > cookbook writers. *(I don't own Crisco or lard and never will -- amI
    > > > doomed in the kitchen?)

    >
    > > Vegetable oil is neutrally flavored as a rule. *In some dishes, I can
    > > taste canola and find it fishy. *But, as a rule, I use canola - and if
    > > I'm worried that the flavor will come through, crisco vegetable oil or
    > > extra virgin olive oil.

    >
    > > --
    > > Yours,
    > > Dan S.
    > > Befuddlin' teh hope since 2009

    >
    > Years ago I helped settle a family of Russian emigrants from the
    > Ukraine. *We stocked their kitchen with basics before they came as we
    > knew their food stamps would be pretty meager. *We got them in nice
    > big bottle of "vegetable oil" - the store brand.


    That was nice of you. A church group? Community group?

    > They couldn't use it
    > (they tried, bless 'em) but they went to the store (speaking almost no
    > English) and somehow communicated that they wanted sunflower oil - who
    > knew? *There's a HUGE sunflower oil refinery less than 100 miles from
    > Fargo . . .


    I'd say. Sunflowers are big business in ND. They grow rapeseed
    (canola) there too, right?
    I like sunflower seeds a lot, in fact I love them salted in the
    shell. The oil isn't my favorite, and it is too high in Omega 6 to be
    particularly healthy in quantity, and it's not great for frying.
    > Lynn in Fargo
    > PS: *in less than 8 months the dad had a good job at a company that
    > makes medium sized tractors. *He had been an engineer in Russia.
    > They *put him to work, he worked on his English and within the second
    > year they were sending him to the Ukraine to consult with the folks
    > marketing the tractors!


    A good immigration success story. I remember Taylor Momsen in those
    Shake 'n Bake commericials. The "... and I helped" ones. Well, you
    "helped" that Ukrainian family. Amazing that that funny looking kid
    who also starred in the Grinch movie is now one of the prettiest girls
    on TV (Gossip Girl).

    --Bryan http://www.TheBonobos.com

  20. #20
    =?ISO-8859-1?Q?Bobo_Bonobo=AE?= Guest

    Default Re: When the recipe calls for 'vegetable oil'

    On Apr 14, 8:03*pm, Christine Dabney <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote:
    > On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 18:02:21 -0700 (PDT), Bobo Bonobo®
    >
    > <CLASS...@BRICK.NET> wrote:
    >
    > *Butter
    >
    > >has too much moisture for some applications.

    >
    > Unless you get one of the European type butters, such as *Plugra. *It
    > has less moisture.


    Sure. But Norman butter is pricey, and it's still higher moisture
    than lard. Of course, nothing tastes better than cow's milk butter.
    >
    > Christine
    > --http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com


    --Bryan

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