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Thread: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

  1. #1
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,
    attorney respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.
    His cooking forays have been recounted here: his omelet sofa cushion,
    the eggs over canned hash, eating pork'n'beans out of a can over the
    kitchen sink, etc. I carefully avert my eyes. I mean, he *likes* this
    stuff, so as long as he doesn't expect me to eat it, whatever floats
    his boat, right?

    But he does like good food. He just doesn't know how to make it. Or
    often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* He'll get close,
    but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer. We've
    been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.

    So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    to buy color photographs.

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  2. #2
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    "Terry Pulliam Burd" <> My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband,
    doting father,
    > attorney respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.
    > His cooking forays have been recounted here: his omelet sofa cushion,
    > the eggs over canned hash, eating pork'n'beans out of a can over the
    > kitchen sink, etc. I carefully avert my eyes. I mean, he *likes* this
    > stuff, so as long as he doesn't expect me to eat it, whatever floats
    > his boat, right?
    >
    > But he does like good food. He just doesn't know how to make it. Or
    > often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* He'll get close,
    > but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    > I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    > steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    > recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    > right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer. We've
    > been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    > strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    > words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    > with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    > crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    > dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    > resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >
    > So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    > strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    > to buy color photographs.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >

    LOL. Thank you, Terry. Mr. Esther's next wife is going to have a real
    challenge to cook his favorites. He sometimes asks for 'red beans and
    stuff'. Another favorite is 'biscuits and stuff'. The stuff for this one
    includes crumbled browned sausage, grated cheese and a hefty sprinkle of
    smoky paprika. Polly


  3. #3
    Pete C. Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >


    > In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy.


    Yep, that's what I call "Salisbury steak" as well.

    > He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak.


    I call that "Swiss steak" and most everyone I know calls it the same.

  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 19:22:52 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > the latest semantic had to do with
    > strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    > words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    > with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    > crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    > dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    > resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >
    > So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    > strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    > to buy color photographs.


    There's this new fangled thing called a computer and Google images
    come in color, but I wonder if his mother's version of a cobbler was
    made with a phyllo crust?

    You're a patient woman, Mrs. Burd.

    --

    Today's mighty oak is just yesterday's nut that held its ground.

  5. #5
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:

    > My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,
    > attorney respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.
    > His cooking forays have been recounted here: his omelet sofa cushion,
    > the eggs over canned hash, eating pork'n'beans out of a can over the
    > kitchen sink, etc. I carefully avert my eyes. I mean, he *likes* this
    > stuff, so as long as he doesn't expect me to eat it, whatever floats
    > his boat, right?
    >
    > But he does like good food. He just doesn't know how to make it. Or
    > often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* He'll get close,
    > but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    > I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    > steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    > recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    > right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer. We've
    > been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    > strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    > words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    > with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    > crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    > dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    > resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >
    > So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    > strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    > to buy color photographs.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd
    >
    > --
    >
    > To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"


    Rotfl! Smacking him being j/nghlm. Check in mail to Mr. Bill for
    confusing skinny a** in time for annual St. Froghop Thrkpt Racing. Hah!

    --
    Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    Holy Order of the Sacred Sisters of St. Pectina of Jella
    "Always in a jam, never in a stew; sometimes in a pickle."
    Pepparkakor particulars posted 11-29-2010;
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller

  6. #6
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,> attorney
    > respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.


    He sounds charming in an irritating sort of way. As long as he doesn't go
    buts or twery when he gets what he thinks is the wrong thing. He may have
    Kitchen Tourette's.



  7. #7
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    Giusi wrote:

    >> My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,> attorney
    >> respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.

    >
    > He sounds charming in an irritating sort of way. As long as he doesn't go
    > buts or twery when he gets what he thinks is the wrong thing. He may have
    > Kitchen Tourette's.


    I'm guessing that "buts" was supposed to be "nuts", but "twery" has me
    stumped.

    Bob



  8. #8
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Giusi wrote:
    >
    >>> My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,>
    >>> attorney
    >>> respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.

    >>
    >> He sounds charming in an irritating sort of way. As long as he doesn't
    >> go
    >> buts or twery when he gets what he thinks is the wrong thing. He may
    >> have
    >> Kitchen Tourette's.

    >
    > I'm guessing that "buts" was supposed to be "nuts", but "twery" has me
    > stumped.


    Nuts or teary. A typist I am not nor ever have been.



  9. #9
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:

    >He asked me once if
    > I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    > steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    > recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    > right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer.


    When I was a kid I used to get Swiss Steak and Salisbury Steak confused
    too. My mom made both. I think they're dishes you don't see much anymore?

  10. #10
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpulli[email protected]> wrote:

    -snip-
    >But he does like good food. He just doesn't know how to make it. Or
    >often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* He'll get close,
    >but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    >I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    >steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    >beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    >in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    >His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    >and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    >recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    >right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer.


    Since Dr. Salisbury is a home boy and the history of the 'steak' is
    interesting- send him here;
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_Salisbury

    [and in spite of all that-- I always feel cheated when I get a
    Salisbury steak because I think it ought to be . . well, steak.<g>]


    >We've
    >been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    >strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    >words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    >with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    >crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    >dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    >resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >
    >So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    >strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    >to buy color photographs.
    >


    Hehe. Gotta know your audience. When I'm gone I wonder what my
    wife will get when she asks for 'Smushed chicken'. [she gets something
    resembling chicken parm, now.]

    Jim

  11. #11
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >
    > So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    > strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    > to buy color photographs.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    But you posted a great strudel recipe - many thanks for that! (Tell
    Bill I live in a Baltimore 'burb
    and used to live on the way to Salisbury!)


  12. #12
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    On 16-Apr-2011, Terry Pulliam Burd <[email protected]> wrote:

    > He asked me once if
    > I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    > steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    > recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    > right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer


    Wikipedia tells us "Salisbury steak was invented by an American physician,
    Dr. J. H. Salisbury 1823–1905), and the term "Salisbury steak" was in use in
    the USA from 1897." So Salisbury MD has no better chance of getting it
    right than Media PA does.
    However, find a Swiss Steak recipe that appeals to you (example below) and
    make it for him, call it Salisbury Steak and make him happy.

    * Exported from MasterCook *

    Swiss Steak

    Recipe By :
    Serving Size : 10 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Main Dish

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    10 6-ounce each beef bottom round steaks -- (180 g each)
    flour for dredging -- as needed
    salt and pepper -- to taste
    2 ounces oil
    1 pound onion -- small dice
    3 garlic cloves -- crushed
    8 ounces celery
    4 ounces flour
    5 pints brown stock
    6 ounces tomato puree

    SACHET:
    2 bay leaves
    1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
    1/2 teaspoon peppercorns -- crushed
    8 parsley stems

    1. Dredge the steaks in flour seasoned with salt and pepper.

    2. Heat the oil in a roasting pan and brown the steaks well on both sides.
    Remove the steaks.

    3. Add the onions, garlic and celery; sauté until tender.

    4. Add the flour and cook to a brown roux.

    5. Gradually, add the brown stock, whisking until the sauce is thickened and
    smooth. Add the tomato purée and sachet.

    6. Return the steaks to the braising pan, cover and cook in a 300ºF (150ºC)
    oven until tender, approximately 2 hours.

    7. Remove the steaks from the sauce. Discard the sachet. Strain the sauce
    and adjust the seasonings. Serve the steaks with the sauce.

    Copyright:
    "© 2003 by Prentice-Hall, Inc."
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

    Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 480 Calories; 29g Fat (55.0% calories
    from fat); 37g Protein; 16g Carbohydrate; 2g Dietary Fiber; 109mg
    Cholesterol; 1339mg Sodium. Exchanges: 1/2 Grain(Starch); 4 1/2 Lean Meat;
    1 Vegetable; 2 1/2 Fat.

    NOTES : Because MasterCook's Ingredient List may not include all of the
    ingredients listed in this recipe, we have displayed the recipe's
    nutritional analysis as it appears in the ON COOKING book.

    Approximate values per serving: Calories 601, Total fat 26 g, Saturated fat
    7 g, Cholesterol 170 mg, Sodium 390 mg, Total carbohydrates 30 g, Protein 61
    g, Vitamin A 49%, Vitamin C 12%, Iron 52%

    Nutr. Assoc. : 2175 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5432 0 0 0 0 0 0 0



    --

    If you have dietary issues that make nutrition information very important
    to you, please calculate your own; the nutrition information supplied with
    this recipe is approximate and should NOT be used by those for whom the
    information is critical.

    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  13. #13
    Terry Pulliam Burd Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    On Sun, 17 Apr 2011 07:51:31 +0200, "Giusi" <decoba[email protected]>
    arranged random neurons and said:

    >
    >"Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    >> My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,> attorney
    >> respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.

    >
    >He sounds charming in an irritating sort of way. As long as he doesn't go
    >buts or twery when he gets what he thinks is the wrong thing. He may have
    >Kitchen Tourette's.
    >

    "Kitchen Tourette's" - I *love* it! Perfect! Bwahahaaa!

    Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    --

    To reply, remove "spambot" and replace it with "cox"

  14. #14
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    On Apr 16, 7:22*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.net> wrote:

    ....
    > Or
    > often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* *He'll get close,
    > but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    > I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    > steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    > recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    > right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer. We've
    > been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    > strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    > words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    > with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    > crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    > dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    > resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >
    > So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    > strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    > to buy color photographs.
    >


    Lawyers make their living from parsing documents and pondering the
    meanings of words, so ask him to research strudel:

    [German, from Middle High German strodel eddy, whirlpool, so called
    from the way the pastry is rolled]

    Strudels are rolled -- simple as that.

  15. #15
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    On Apr 16, 8:50*pm, "Pete C." <aux3.DO...@snet.net> wrote:
    > Terry Pulliam Burd wrote:
    >
    > > In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > > in cooked patties in gravy.

    >
    > Yep, that's what I call "Salisbury steak" as well.
    >
    > > He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > > and called it Salisbury steak.

    >
    > I call that "Swiss steak" and most everyone I know calls it the same.


    How about the otherwise productive citizens who confuse "Swiss" with
    "Swedish," not to mention Austrian (strudel and schnitzel) with
    Australian (Vegemite and Vegemite)?

  16. #16
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    On Apr 16, 10:22*pm, Terry Pulliam Burd <ntpull...@spambot.net> wrote:
    > My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,
    > attorney respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.
    > His cooking forays have been recounted here: his omelet sofa cushion,
    > the eggs over canned hash, eating pork'n'beans out of a can over the
    > kitchen sink, etc. I carefully avert my eyes. *I mean, he *likes* this
    > stuff, so as long as he doesn't expect me to eat it, whatever floats
    > his boat, right?
    >
    > But he does like good food. He just doesn't know how to make it. Or
    > often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* *He'll get close,
    > but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    > I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    > steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    > recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    > right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer. We've
    > been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    > strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    > words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    > with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    > crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    > dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    > resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >
    > So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    > strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    > to buy color photographs.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    Does anyone know a cookbook with good pictures? Words for foods can
    vary widely. There's a connection between blintzes and blini, but
    despite being used as synonyms by some, they're not the same. Kugel
    means "ball" or "bullet" in German and "pudding" in Yiddish. You can
    have fun with that if you want to.

    Jerry
    --
    "The rights of the best of men are secured only as the
    rights of the vilest and most abhorrent are protected."
    - Chief Justice Charles Evans Hughes, 1927
    __________________________________________________ ___________________

  17. #17
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,
    > attorney respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.
    > His cooking forays have been recounted here: his omelet sofa cushion,
    > the eggs over canned hash, eating pork'n'beans out of a can over the
    > kitchen sink, etc. I carefully avert my eyes. I mean, he *likes* this
    > stuff, so as long as he doesn't expect me to eat it, whatever floats
    > his boat, right?
    >
    > But he does like good food. He just doesn't know how to make it. Or
    > often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* He'll get close,
    > but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    > I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    > steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    > beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    > in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    > His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    > and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    > recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    > right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer. We've
    > been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    > strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    > words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    > with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    > crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    > dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    > resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >
    > So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    > strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    > to buy color photographs.
    >
    > Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd


    The steak with tomatoes sounds like the Swiss steak that my mom used to
    make. Luckily she didn't make it very often because I didn't like it at
    all. I don't know what kind of meat she used but it was very tough.

    My brother made Salisbury steak. There were bread crumbs and probably egg
    in the ground beef and it was served with gravy. No onions or peppers but I
    have had it this way in one restaurant. They put no filler in the beef
    though.

    I do remember a story in the Good Old Days magazine about a young man who
    couldn't figure out why when he got chicken and dumplings at various houses
    where he was working as a farm hand, the dumplings didn't taste like what
    his mom and grandma made. When he told his mom of this, she laughed and
    told him that what he had been eating at those houses really was chicken and
    dumplings. What she and her mom did was took leftover pie crust, cut it in
    squares and threw it on top of chicken stew and called it dumplings.

    The odd thing is, my MIL once made chicken and dumplings and her dumplings
    were made with what I would call pie crust. She rolled it out thin and cut
    it in little bite sized squares. Although it was good it in no way
    resembles the big fluffy dumplings that I make. My mom never made dumplings
    AFAIK.



  18. #18
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 19:22:52 -0700, Terry Pulliam Burd
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> the latest semantic had to do with
    >> strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    >> words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    >> with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    >> crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    >> dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    >> resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >>
    >> So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    >> strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    >> to buy color photographs.

    >
    > There's this new fangled thing called a computer and Google images
    > come in color, but I wonder if his mother's version of a cobbler was
    > made with a phyllo crust?
    >
    > You're a patient woman, Mrs. Burd.


    Alton brown made a cobbler with pie crust. I have never seen a recipe for
    such a thing but I did look. I do remember buying some kind of frozen
    cobbler that had a pie crust top on it.



  19. #19
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 17 Apr 2011 22:38:04 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Alton brown made a cobbler with pie crust. I have never seen a recipe for
    >>such a thing but I did look. I do remember buying some kind of frozen
    >>cobbler that had a pie crust top on it.

    >
    > Southern style cobblers are often made in such a fashion.


    Hmmm... I did try to find such a recipe but could not. However part of my
    problem is that I need a gluten free pie crust and the recipes I find for it
    always seem to have egg. I can't have egg.



  20. #20
    Storrmmee Guest

    Default Re: What You Want May Not Be What You Want

    your dumpling recipe please?

    lee
    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:iogi7t$6rq$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Terry Pulliam Burd" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> My dear Bill is a wonderful man, loving husband, doting father,
    >> attorney respected by bench and bar. BUT he is a kitchen troglodyte.
    >> His cooking forays have been recounted here: his omelet sofa cushion,
    >> the eggs over canned hash, eating pork'n'beans out of a can over the
    >> kitchen sink, etc. I carefully avert my eyes. I mean, he *likes* this
    >> stuff, so as long as he doesn't expect me to eat it, whatever floats
    >> his boat, right?
    >>
    >> But he does like good food. He just doesn't know how to make it. Or
    >> often doesn't actually know what a dish is *called* He'll get close,
    >> but that only works with horseshoes and dynamite. He asked me once if
    >> I knew how to make Salisbury steak, 'cause he really likes Salisbury
    >> steak. Well, yeah. In my lexicography, "Salisbury steak" is ground
    >> beef patties sauteed with onions, mushrooms, spices, stock and results
    >> in cooked patties in gravy. He looked at the dish and was dumbfounded.
    >> His mother made a dish with round steak cooked to death with tomatoes
    >> and called it Salisbury steak. Bill claims this must be the right
    >> recipe, because his mother was from Baltimore MD and Salisbury MD is
    >> right up the road, ipso facto... go try to argue with a lawyer. We've
    >> been to this rodeo before, but the latest semantic had to do with
    >> strudel/streusel/cobbler. Now, I'll admit that there is a world of
    >> words out there that cover a dish that is pretty much just a cobbler
    >> with more or less topping, done upside down or right side up. Cobbler,
    >> crisp, Betty, pandowdy, slump, grunt, it's all a fruit dish with
    >> dough. But a *strudel* is a whole 'nother critter that doesn't bear a
    >> resemblance to cobbler other than that the fillings are similar.
    >>
    >> So, imagine his surprise when he asked for a strudel and *got* a
    >> strudel but *expected* a cobbler. <sigh> This rodeo is going to have
    >> to buy color photographs.
    >>
    >> Terry "Squeaks" Pulliam Burd

    >
    > The steak with tomatoes sounds like the Swiss steak that my mom used to
    > make. Luckily she didn't make it very often because I didn't like it at
    > all. I don't know what kind of meat she used but it was very tough.
    >
    > My brother made Salisbury steak. There were bread crumbs and probably egg
    > in the ground beef and it was served with gravy. No onions or peppers but
    > I have had it this way in one restaurant. They put no filler in the beef
    > though.
    >
    > I do remember a story in the Good Old Days magazine about a young man who
    > couldn't figure out why when he got chicken and dumplings at various
    > houses where he was working as a farm hand, the dumplings didn't taste
    > like what his mom and grandma made. When he told his mom of this, she
    > laughed and told him that what he had been eating at those houses really
    > was chicken and dumplings. What she and her mom did was took leftover pie
    > crust, cut it in squares and threw it on top of chicken stew and called it
    > dumplings.
    >
    > The odd thing is, my MIL once made chicken and dumplings and her dumplings
    > were made with what I would call pie crust. She rolled it out thin and
    > cut it in little bite sized squares. Although it was good it in no way
    > resembles the big fluffy dumplings that I make. My mom never made
    > dumplings AFAIK.
    >




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