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Thread: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

  1. #1
    Andy Guest

    Default What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?

    From a TV "How It's Made" segment.

    Andy

  2. #2
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    Andy wrote:

    > What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas
    >
    > How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?


    Spanish and italians, since it sounds very similar to italian. "Impanata":
    dipped in breadcrumbs (pane = bread), almost the same sintactical structure,
    just change "en" to "im", maybe some "d" to "t", and you're there.
    --
    ViLco
    Let the liquor do the thinking




  3. #3
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    "ViLco" <vi[email protected]> wrote:

    > Andy wrote:
    >
    >> What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas
    >>
    >> How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?

    >
    > Spanish and italians, since it sounds very similar to italian.
    > "Impanata": dipped in breadcrumbs (pane = bread), almost the same
    > sintactical structure, just change "en" to "im", maybe some "d" to
    > "t", and you're there.



    Vilco,

    Great.

    Thanks!

    Best,

    Andy

  4. #4
    pramod kumar Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    On Jul 7, 2:40*pm, "ViLco" <villi...@tin.it> wrote:
    > Andy wrote:
    > > What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    >
    > > How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?

    >
    > Spanish and italians, since it sounds very similar to italian. "Impanata":
    > dipped in breadcrumbs (pane = bread), almost the same sintactical structure,
    > just change "en" to "im", maybe some "d" to "t", and you're there.
    > --
    > ViLco
    > Let the liquor do the thinking



  5. #5
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas


    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas
    >
    > How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?
    >
    > From a TV "How It's Made" segment.
    >
    > Andy


    Of course,

    fry quickly in hot oil to soften & coat the tortilla,
    Coat with sauce (dip into a saucepan with sauce)
    Fill
    bake. (restaurant salamander)

    Dimitri


  6. #6
    Andy Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    > "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas
    >>
    >> How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?
    >>
    >> From a TV "How It's Made" segment.
    >>
    >> Andy

    >
    > Of course,
    >
    > fry quickly in hot oil to soften & coat the tortilla,
    > Coat with sauce (dip into a saucepan with sauce)
    > Fill
    > bake. (restaurant salamander)



    Dimitri,

    You're a skilled chef. I tend to lean on Trader Joe's, etc., a lot.

    The enchilada segment was another one of those assembly line exposÚs.

    Best,

    Andy

  7. #7
    projectile vomit chick Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    On Jul 7, 4:40*am, "ViLco" <villi...@tin.it> wrote:
    > Andy wrote:
    > > What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    >
    > > How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?

    >
    > Spanish and italians, since it sounds very similar to italian. "Impanata":
    > dipped in breadcrumbs (pane = bread), almost the same sintactical structure,
    > just change "en" to "im", maybe some "d" to "t", and you're there.


    Empanadas?

  8. #8
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    projectile vomit chick wrote:

    >>> How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in
    >>> chili?


    >> Spanish and italians, since it sounds very similar to italian.
    >> "Impanata": dipped in breadcrumbs (pane = bread), almost the same
    >> sintactical structure, just change "en" to "im", maybe some "d" to
    >> "t", and you're there.


    > Empanadas?


    That would be the perfect literal translation of the word "impanata" from
    italian to spanish. Then the actual meaning of the two words is different:
    impanata in italian is the past particplie of "impanare", which means "to
    cover with breadrumbs", while empanada in spanish indicates a particular
    recipe with the usual local variants. I see that argentinian empanadas are
    very similar to the southern italian street foods calzone and panzerotto,
    the main difference is in the "staple" ingredients in the filling: for
    empanadas it's meat, for calzone and panzerotto it's tomato + mozzarella,
    apart some local variants.
    Empanadas: http://tinyurl.com/3w6gjzj
    Panzerotto: http://tinyurl.com/3s9ksru
    --
    ViLco
    Let the liquor do the thinking




  9. #9
    Dimitri Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]..
    > "Dimitri" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> "Andy" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas
    >>>
    >>> How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?
    >>>
    >>> From a TV "How It's Made" segment.
    >>>
    >>> Andy

    >>
    >> Of course,
    >>
    >> fry quickly in hot oil to soften & coat the tortilla,
    >> Coat with sauce (dip into a saucepan with sauce)
    >> Fill
    >> bake. (restaurant salamander)

    >
    >
    > Dimitri,
    >
    > You're a skilled chef. I tend to lean on Trader Joe's, etc., a lot.



    Nope I just used to watch Lupe (our servant) in Mexico City when she used to
    make them. Our favorite at the time Enchiladas' Suisas.

    The Kitchen was where I learned to speak Spanish - No Spanish - No food.
    :-)

    Dimitri


  10. #10
    Jerry Avins Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    On Jul 7, 5:40*am, "ViLco" <villi...@tin.it> wrote:
    > Andy wrote:
    > > What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    >
    > > How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?

    >
    > Spanish and italians, since it sounds very similar to italian. "Impanata":
    > dipped in breadcrumbs (pane = bread), almost the same sintactical structure,
    > just change "en" to "im", maybe some "d" to "t", and you're there.


    Etymologically, "empanada" means "breaded"; "en croute". The usual
    translation from Spanish is "pie" (or "patty" or "turnover" or
    "fraud").

    Jerry
    --
    Engineering is the art of making what you want from things you can get.

  11. #11
    BubbaBob Guest

    Default Re: What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas

    Andy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > What I learned from TV this morning: Enchiladas
    >
    > How many knew it means (perhaps loosely translated), dipped in chili?
    >
    > From a TV "How It's Made" segment.
    >
    > Andy
    >


    I would think that it would be instantly obvious to anyone who saw the
    word.

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