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Thread: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

  1. #1
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    I bought something the other day at TJ's. The ingredients list included
    chocolate, and in the parenthesis listing the chocolate's ingredients,
    it showed "hydrolyzed palm oil."

    I know that "hydrogenated" is something to be avoided - what's
    "hydrolyzed?" I did some Googling and reading but I confess the
    explanations are all over my head technically. It seems to involve
    adding some sort of acids to oils, provoking a chemical reaction that
    separates the oils into component molecules/parts - but that's as much
    sense as I can make out of it.

    Thanks in advance.

    -S-



  2. #2
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    On Jan 21, 10:38*am, "Steve Freides" <st...@kbnj.com> wrote:
    > I bought something the other day at TJ's. *The ingredients list included
    > chocolate, and in the parenthesis listing the chocolate's ingredients,
    > it showed "hydrolyzed palm oil."


    It means split up. I've never heard of hydrolyzed oil that has not
    been also fractionated.
    >
    > I know that "hydrogenated" is something to be avoided - what's
    > "hydrolyzed?" *I did some Googling and reading but I confess the
    > explanations are all over my head technically. *It seems to involve
    > adding some sort of acids to oils, provoking a chemical reaction that
    > separates the oils into component molecules/parts - but that's as much
    > sense as I can make out of it.


    An oil can be hydrolyzed to yield 3 fatty acids and one glycerol. One
    or more fatty acids can be isolated, then recombined with glycerol to
    form mono, di or tri-glcerides. Monolaurin is produced by hydrolyzing
    and fractionating coconut or palm kernel oil, then combining lauric
    acid and glycerol in a 1:1 ratio. I have no idea what they did to the
    palm oil in that chocolate product. I can say that unaltered virgin
    palm oil is far less healthful that palm *kernel* oil.

    *Real* chocolate has no fats in it other than cocoa butter.
    >
    > Thanks in advance.
    >
    > -S-


    --Bryan

  3. #3
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    On Jan 21, 10:57*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    ....
    >
    > *Real* chocolate has no fats in it other than cocoa butter.
    >
    > --Bryan


    Even if it's cocoa mixed with pecan oil, which is FAKE chocolate!! And
    thus unconsumable!

    Or was that particular FAKE chocolate "pretty good"?

    ;-)

    John Kuthe...

  4. #4
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    On Jan 21, 11:03*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 21, 10:57*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > ...
    >
    >
    >
    > > *Real* chocolate has no fats in it other than cocoa butter.

    >
    > > --Bryan

    >
    > Even if it's cocoa mixed with pecan oil, which is FAKE chocolate!! And
    > thus unconsumable!
    >
    > Or was that particular FAKE chocolate "pretty good"?
    >

    That wasn't chocolate. Did I call it chocolate?
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    --Bryan

  5. #5
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    On Jan 21, 12:11*pm, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 21, 11:03*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:> On Jan 21, 10:57*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > ...

    >
    > > > *Real* chocolate has no fats in it other than cocoa butter.

    >
    > > > --Bryan

    >
    > > Even if it's cocoa mixed with pecan oil, which is FAKE chocolate!! And
    > > thus unconsumable!

    >
    > > Or was that particular FAKE chocolate "pretty good"?

    >
    > That wasn't chocolate. *Did I call it chocolate?
    >


    Did it taste good?

    AHA!! ;-)

    John Kuthe...

  6. #6
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    On Jan 21, 12:26*pm, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 21, 12:11*pm, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > On Jan 21, 11:03*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:> On Jan 21, 10:57*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > > ...

    >
    > > > > *Real* chocolate has no fats in it other than cocoa butter.

    >
    > > > > --Bryan

    >
    > > > Even if it's cocoa mixed with pecan oil, which is FAKE chocolate!! And
    > > > thus unconsumable!

    >
    > > > Or was that particular FAKE chocolate "pretty good"?

    >
    > > That wasn't chocolate. *Did I call it chocolate?

    >
    > Did it taste good?


    Yes, but it was nothing like chocolate. It was chocolate flavored
    whatever. Are you sticking up for that crisco stuff or something?
    >
    > AHA!! ;-)
    >
    > John Kuthe...


    --Bryan

  7. #7
    John Kuthe Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    On Jan 21, 12:44*pm, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On Jan 21, 12:26*pm, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:
    >
    >
    >
    > > On Jan 21, 12:11*pm, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:

    >
    > > > On Jan 21, 11:03*am, John Kuthe <johnkuth...@gmail.com> wrote:> On Jan 21, 10:57*am, Bryan <bryangsimm...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > > > > ...

    >
    > > > > > *Real* chocolate has no fats in it other than cocoa butter.

    >
    > > > > > --Bryan

    >
    > > > > Even if it's cocoa mixed with pecan oil, which is FAKE chocolate!! And
    > > > > thus unconsumable!

    >
    > > > > Or was that particular FAKE chocolate "pretty good"?

    >
    > > > That wasn't chocolate. *Did I call it chocolate?

    >
    > > Did it taste good?

    >
    > Yes, but it was nothing like chocolate. *It was chocolate flavored
    > whatever. *Are you sticking up for that crisco stuff or something?

    ....

    Always. As I said it's the best *tasting* compound coating I found.

    And I never claim it's real chocolate. I call it 'chocolate' for the
    uninitiates who don't know the difference and/or don't care, which is
    most people. And I always stress that I cover my Chocolate Covered
    Cherries in *real* dark chocolate, of which I'm very proud. Don't
    think I'm gonna use the 65% next year though, cause while *I* thought
    it was slightly better tasting, I didn't get any screaming positive
    feedback from anyone (you most specifically) and even some negative
    feedback (different less desirable mouthfeel which I agree with) and I
    think for 2x the price I can go back to my old standard, the 57% dark
    from Chocolate Chocolate Chocolate.

    John Kuthe...

    John Kuthe...

  8. #8
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    John Kuthe wrote:

    > Always. As I said it's the best *tasting* compound coating I found.


    This is also a coating compound - it was TJ's chocolate covered potatoe
    chips. How is the fact that it's a coating thing related, I wonder.

    -S-



  9. #9
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    Steve Freides wrote:
    >
    > I bought something the other day at TJ's. The ingredients list included
    > chocolate, and in the parenthesis listing the chocolate's ingredients,
    > it showed "hydrolyzed palm oil."


    That sounds like a misspelling.

    > I know that "hydrogenated" is something to be avoided - what's
    > "hydrolyzed?" I did some Googling and reading but I confess the
    > explanations are all over my head technically. It seems to involve
    > adding some sort of acids to oils, provoking a chemical reaction that
    > separates the oils into component molecules/parts - but that's as much
    > sense as I can make out of it.


    Technically, splitting a triglyceride into its
    component fatty acids and glycerol is hydrolysis,
    but it's usually called saponification. It's
    usually done with alkali, but it can be done with
    acid. "Saponification" means soapmaking, which
    uses this reaction.

  10. #10
    Doug Freyburger Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    Steve Freides wrote:
    >
    > I bought something the other day at TJ's. The ingredients list included
    > chocolate, and in the parenthesis listing the chocolate's ingredients,
    > it showed "hydrolyzed palm oil."
    >
    > I know that "hydrogenated" is something to be avoided - what's
    > "hydrolyzed?" I did some Googling and reading but I confess the
    > explanations are all over my head technically. It seems to involve
    > adding some sort of acids to oils, provoking a chemical reaction that
    > separates the oils into component molecules/parts - but that's as much
    > sense as I can make out of it.


    Hydrolized is an organic chemical process used in living cells to build
    up and break down complex organic molecules.

    In the case of oils it's a commercial process where heat and/or acid is
    used to create transfats in the oil. Transfats greatly increase the
    shelf live of the products they are in, sort of a preservative.

    For health proposes less hyrodolized oil is better, none is best. For
    industrial purposes more hydrolized oil is better because there is less
    spoilage. So it's an economic tradeoff.

  11. #11
    Bryan Guest

    Default Re: What Is Hydrolized Oil?

    On Jan 23, 3:01*pm, Doug Freyburger <dfrey...@yahoo.com> wrote:
    > Steve Freides wrote:
    >
    > > I bought something the other day at TJ's. *The ingredients list included
    > > chocolate, and in the parenthesis listing the chocolate's ingredients,
    > > it showed "hydrolyzed palm oil."

    >
    > > I know that "hydrogenated" is something to be avoided - what's
    > > "hydrolyzed?" *I did some Googling and reading but I confess the
    > > explanations are all over my head technically. *It seems to involve
    > > adding some sort of acids to oils, provoking a chemical reaction that
    > > separates the oils into component molecules/parts - but that's as much
    > > sense as I can make out of it.

    >
    > Hydrolized is an organic chemical process used in living cells to build
    > up and break down complex organic molecules.
    >
    > In the case of oils it's a commercial process where heat and/or acid is
    > used to create transfats in the oil. *Transfats greatly increase the
    > shelf live of the products they are in, sort of a preservative.


    No. That's hydroGENATION. Read my reply to the original post above.
    >

    --Bryan

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