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Thread: What a good book on sauces?

  1. #1
    Prof Wonmug Guest

    Default What a good book on sauces?

    I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    good book?

    I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    time.

    Here are a couple I found on Amazon, arranged in the order that seems
    to fit my needs:


    1. The Complete Book Of Sauces, Sallie Williams

    http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-...5777915&sr=1-4


    2. The Sauce Book: 300 World Sauces Made Simple, Paul Gayler

    http://www.amazon.com/Sauce-Book-Wor...5777915&sr=1-3

    This has only 4 reviews, but they seem to indicate that this one has
    much simpler recipes.


    3. Get Saucy: Make Dinner a New Way Every Day with Simple Sauces,
    Marinades, Glazes, Dressings, Pestos, Pasta Sauces, Salsas, and More,
    Grace Parisi

    http://www.amazon.com/Get-Saucy-Dinn...5777915&sr=1-6



    4. Sauces: Classical and Contemporary Sauce Making, James Peterson

    http://www.amazon.com/Sauces-Classic...5777915&sr=1-1

    This looks like it is too advanced for me.



    Any comments or other suggestions?



    I'd also be interested in recommendations for good web sites.

  2. #2
    Mort Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    Prof Wonmug wrote:

    >
    > 4. Sauces: Classical and Contemporary Sauce Making, James Peterson
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Sauces-Classic...5777915&sr=1-1
    >
    > This looks like it is too advanced for me.
    >


    You really only need this one.

    I'm sure you'll do well with it. It's not really all that technical, it's just
    that it covers the material in more depth. That's much better than "easy and
    superficial". The Peterson book will be a durable reference for you where
    the others won't.

    Have fun!

    --
    Mort

  3. #3
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?



    Prof Wonmug wrote:
    > I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    > good book?
    >
    > I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    > give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    > time.
    >
    > Here are a couple I found on Amazon, arranged in the order that seems
    > to fit my needs:
    >
    >


    If you want an all in one source of instructions for the simplest to the
    most complex of sauces Escoffier's "Guide Culinaire" is available
    relatively inexpensively.

    http://www.amazon.com/Escoffier-Culi...ref=pd_sim_b_5

    Not only will this text provide you with instructions for all the
    classic sauces but also for the stocks & roux's that make up a lot of
    them along with instructions for various reduction sauces, but also
    mayonnaise, tartars,
    various horseradish sauces, and lots of other info on more esoteric or
    little know but delicious sauces.

    Plus you get all the rest of the information about all aspects of basic
    cooking, food handling and preperation.

    Much of the information is duplicated in the Larusse Gastronomique which
    Escoffier was an original contributor to and editor of.

    The only draw back is that it does not mention any of the Asian sauces,
    a favorite of mine being just equal parts soy sauce, sesame oil and sake.
    Use as is or add garlic, ginger, peppers, lemon juice, green onions,
    shallots, lemon grass, Chinese 5 spices etc.

    As fond as i am of the Escoffier text, even i will admit the 'curry'
    recipes in Escoffier's text are best ignored in favor of more authentic
    and robust versions.

    But for the classics, hollandaise, espagnole, demi glace, jus lie,
    bechamel and various fruit and dessert sauces you cant do better, there
    is a very extensive section on compound butter as well that make very
    nice simple reduction sauces.
    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  4. #4
    Mort Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:

    >
    >
    > Prof Wonmug wrote:
    >
    >> I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    >> good book?
    >>
    >> I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    >> give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    >> time.
    >>
    >> Here are a couple I found on Amazon, arranged in the order that seems
    >> to fit my needs:
    >>
    >>

    >
    > If you want an all in one source of instructions for the simplest to the
    > most complex of sauces Escoffier's "Guide Culinaire" is available
    > relatively inexpensively.
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Escoffier-Culi...ref=pd_sim_b_5
    >
    >
    > Not only will this text provide you with instructions for all the
    > classic sauces but also for the stocks & roux's that make up a lot of
    > them along with instructions for various reduction sauces, but also
    > mayonnaise, tartars,
    > various horseradish sauces, and lots of other info on more esoteric or
    > little know but delicious sauces.


    Get real.

    For a beginner, that book would be a total disaster. I don't know
    a single person that used Escoffier as a beginning text that's
    under about 80 years old.

    Cooking has come a long way since the early 20th century and
    so has publishing.

    Yes, it's a classic, and it's definitely a must have for hardcore
    foodies, but that has nothing to do with what the OP is looking for.

    --
    Mort

  5. #5
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?


    "Prof Wonmug" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    > good book?
    >
    >

    You don't need or even want a book about sauces. All you need to know is:

    1. How to make stocks[beef, veal, chicken, veg, fish, etc]. This is most
    important.
    2..How to make roux to thicken and how to use cornstarch.
    3. How to season, when you're doing something on your own.

    The rest is following the recipe for what you're preparing. That would
    include hollandaise and béarnaise sauce, though I doubt that most home chefs
    use that very often. I don't. I don't think the sauce should be separate
    from the underlying recipe the author is writing about.

    Get one of Julia Child's books on the fundamentals, like "The Way to Cook",
    published in 1989, though still in print. She covers clearly what you are
    probably looking for.

    Best of luck,

    Kent




  6. #6
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?


    "Mort" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:hkth8f$p6q$[email protected]..
    > Prof Wonmug wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> 4. Sauces: Classical and Contemporary Sauce Making, James Peterson
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Sauces-Classic...5777915&sr=1-1
    >>
    >> This looks like it is too advanced for me.
    >>

    >
    > You really only need this one.
    >
    > I'm sure you'll do well with it. It's not really all that technical, it's
    > just
    > that it covers the material in more depth. That's much better than "easy
    > and
    > superficial". The Peterson book will be a durable reference for you where
    > the others won't.
    >
    > Have fun!
    >
    > --
    > Mort
    >
    >

    Having said what I said below, the Peterson book does look good. I have it
    on reserve at the local library. Depending on where one is with cooking,
    however, I'd still vote for a book like "The Way to Cook" by Julia Child, or
    something comparable.
    http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss...he+Way+to+Cook I
    can't think of what book would be comparable. That's Julia's legacy.

    Kent








  7. #7
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 21:27:28 -0800, Prof Wonmug wrote:

    > I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    > good book?


    THE Book.

    http://www.amazon.com/Sauces-Classic.../dp/0471292753

    -sw

  8. #8
    Kalmia Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?




    See if you can locate a show or info on Emeril's "Mother Sauces". I
    saw it one night, and wish I"d taken notes. I think he made three or
    four sauce bases.

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Prof Wonmug <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    > good book?
    >
    > I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    > give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    > time.
    >
    > Here are a couple I found on Amazon, arranged in the order that seems
    > to fit my needs:
    >
    >
    > 1. The Complete Book Of Sauces, Sallie Williams
    >
    > http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-...28603605/ref=s
    > r_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265777915&sr=1-4


    Good enough!

    Check your local library. If they don't have it, before you lay out
    $12, go to B&N or the other big one and have a look-see. SEE for
    yourself if the recipes look realistic for your needs and your skills.

    You don't say what you want to know or make, but I'll bet a big basic
    cookbook (I'm thinking of Betty Crocker, Better Homes & Gardens,
    Pillsbury--assuming they all still publish basic cookery books) will
    provide what you need. Go to the sauces section and look at the
    recipes. LOOK at at least four or five recipes and see what they all
    have in common. A whisk? Do you have a whisk? Go to Target and get
    one. A wood spoon? Lather, rinse, and repeat. :-)

    If you get the book for the library, MAKE 30-60 minutes to sit quietly
    and read the introduction and several recipes that interest you. If you
    find one that makes your mouth water, give it a go. It doesn't have to
    be perfect. When I teach jamming, I recommend going through all the
    physical motions before beginning -- are the ingredients prepared or at
    the ready? Do I have all the necessary equipment at hand?

    You can do this.

    Best luck -- and let us know what came of it.

    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    Buffalo Chicken Quesadillas - pictures 2-7-2010

  10. #10
    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?



    Mort wrote:
    > Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>
    >> Prof Wonmug wrote:
    >>
    >>> I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    >>> good book?
    >>>
    >>> I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    >>> give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    >>> time.
    >>>
    >>> Here are a couple I found on Amazon, arranged in the order that seems
    >>> to fit my needs:
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> If you want an all in one source of instructions for the simplest to
    >> the most complex of sauces Escoffier's "Guide Culinaire" is available
    >> relatively inexpensively.
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Escoffier-Culi...ref=pd_sim_b_5
    >>
    >>
    >> Not only will this text provide you with instructions for all the
    >> classic sauces but also for the stocks & roux's that make up a lot of
    >> them along with instructions for various reduction sauces, but also
    >> mayonnaise, tartars,
    >> various horseradish sauces, and lots of other info on more esoteric or
    >> little know but delicious sauces.

    >
    >
    > Get real.
    >
    > For a beginner, that book would be a total disaster.


    Have you read it? the instructions are clear, precise and simple. Or are
    you just a snob? demonstrate your superior knowledge by bashing the
    classics?

    The text has Excellent instructions on stocks & the various roux's and
    while i admit some of the recipes are complex the basic instructions in
    the various sections for the various types of food prep are very
    informative.

    > I don't know
    > a single person that used Escoffier as a beginning text that's
    > under about 80 years old.


    THe OP was asking about sauces, not a beginning text.

    What would you prefer "Joy of Cooking"? Fanny Farmer? If the Cesarini &
    Kenton "English Cookery" were more widely available i would certainly
    recommend it.

    But for a comprehensive manual of cooking, especially sauces the Guide
    Culinaire is a classic, and unless the "beginner" cook is a functional
    illiterate they wont have any difficulty with the text.

    >
    > Cooking has come a long way since the early 20th century and
    > so has publishing.


    Food production and distribution has come a long way but unless you are
    talking about presentation and style food has not changed all that much,
    the classics are still the classics.


    >
    > Yes, it's a classic, and it's definitely a must have for hardcore
    > foodies, but that has nothing to do with what the OP is looking for.
    >


    In your opinion, in mine it the mother lode of info on the OP's question.

    The only reasonable complaint i would make about it is the cost, the OP
    may not wish to spend $40.00 on a book but even then, shopping around
    can very likely produce a less expensive, previously owned copy.

    --

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3
    Owner|Moderator
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/JoeTarot
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/SomeThingsTarot


  11. #11
    blake murphy Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    On Tue, 09 Feb 2010 21:27:28 -0800, Prof Wonmug wrote:

    > I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    > good book?
    >
    > I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    > give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    > time.
    >


    not explicitly for sauces, but How to Cook Without a Book: Recipes and
    Techniques Every Cook Should Know by Heart

    <http://www.amazon.com/How-Cook-Without-Book-Techniques/dp/0767902793/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265821849&sr=1-1>

    ....does have a few pan sauces. but for simplicity of technique, and short
    prep time, it might be of interest to you. (i don't own it myself; checked
    it out at the library.)

    your pal,
    blake

  12. #12
    Mort Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:


    > In your opinion, in mine it the mother lode of info on the OP's question.
    >


    No, not just my opinion. Name one cooking school, teacher, expert,
    etc, who uses Escoffier as a beginning text.

    You're the only one in the entire known universe.

    You don't use Escoffier as a beginning text for cooking the
    same way you don't use Isaac Newton's "Principia Mathmatica" as
    a beginning text for math and physics. Not in the 21st century.

    Of course they're great books (beyond great), but they're a
    terrible way to try and learn basics.

    --
    Mort

  13. #13
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    Mort wrote:
    > Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:
    >
    >
    >> In your opinion, in mine it the mother lode of info on the OP's
    >> question.
    >>

    >
    > No, not just my opinion. Name one cooking school, teacher, expert,
    > etc, who uses Escoffier as a beginning text.
    >
    > You're the only one in the entire known universe.
    >
    > You don't use Escoffier as a beginning text for cooking the
    > same way you don't use Isaac Newton's "Principia Mathmatica" as
    > a beginning text for math and physics. Not in the 21st century.
    >
    > Of course they're great books (beyond great), but they're a
    > terrible way to try and learn basics.


    "Joy of Cooking", by Irma Rombauer, is a great start.

    Dora


  14. #14
    Serene Vannoy Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    Top-posting rather than snipping, just so I can say this is the best,
    most perfect response to a newb question I've ever seen on Usenet.

    Serene

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:

    > Good enough!
    >
    > Check your local library. If they don't have it, before you lay out
    > $12, go to B&N or the other big one and have a look-see. SEE for
    > yourself if the recipes look realistic for your needs and your skills.
    >
    > You don't say what you want to know or make, but I'll bet a big basic
    > cookbook (I'm thinking of Betty Crocker, Better Homes & Gardens,
    > Pillsbury--assuming they all still publish basic cookery books) will
    > provide what you need. Go to the sauces section and look at the
    > recipes. LOOK at at least four or five recipes and see what they all
    > have in common. A whisk? Do you have a whisk? Go to Target and get
    > one. A wood spoon? Lather, rinse, and repeat. :-)
    >
    > If you get the book for the library, MAKE 30-60 minutes to sit quietly
    > and read the introduction and several recipes that interest you. If you
    > find one that makes your mouth water, give it a go. It doesn't have to
    > be perfect. When I teach jamming, I recommend going through all the
    > physical motions before beginning -- are the ingredients prepared or at
    > the ready? Do I have all the necessary equipment at hand?
    >
    > You can do this.
    >
    > Best luck -- and let us know what came of it.
    >



    --
    "I tend to come down on the side of autonomy. Once people are grown up,
    I believe they have the right to go to hell in the handbasket of their
    choosing." -- Pat Kight, on alt.polyamory

  15. #15
    Janet Bostwick Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Prof Wonmug <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    >> good book?

    snip
    >> 1. The Complete Book Of Sauces, Sallie Williams
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-...28603605/ref=s
    >> r_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265777915&sr=1-4

    >
    > snip
    > You don't say what you want to know or make, but I'll bet a big basic
    > cookbook (I'm thinking of Betty Crocker, Better Homes & Gardens,
    > Pillsbury--assuming they all still publish basic cookery books) will
    > provide what you need. Go to the sauces section and look at the
    > recipes. LOOK at at least four or five recipes and see what they all
    > have in common. A whisk? Do you have a whisk? Go to Target and get
    > one. A wood spoon? Lather, rinse, and repeat. :-)

    snip
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    > Buffalo Chicken Quesadillas - pictures 2-7-2010


    This is the best answer. A cookbook such as Barb suggests will also tell
    you what sauce goes with which dish. A book about sauces isn't going to
    prepare you for making the accompanying dish.
    Janet



  16. #16
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?


    "Melba's Jammin'" <barbschaller@ea[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Prof Wonmug <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    >> good book?
    >>
    >> I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    >> give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    >> time.
    >>
    >> Here are a couple I found on Amazon, arranged in the order that seems
    >> to fit my needs:
    >>
    >>
    >> 1. The Complete Book Of Sauces, Sallie Williams
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-...28603605/ref=s
    >> r_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265777915&sr=1-4

    >
    > Good enough!
    >
    >>snip>

    >
    > You don't say what you want to know or make, but I'll bet a big basic
    > cookbook (I'm thinking of Betty Crocker, Better Homes & Gardens,
    > Pillsbury--assuming they all still publish basic cookery books) will
    > provide what you need. Go to the sauces section and look at the


    > >snip>

    > --
    > -Barb,
    >
    >

    The Better Homes and Garadens cookbook doesn't say anything about making
    roux or stock. That's the most basic part of sauce making; that's where you
    must start. The Joy of Cooking covers stocks and has a few words about roux,
    but doesn't cover the fundamentals of combining and making a white or brown
    sauce either. You have to begin with that.

    Kent








  17. #17
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?


    "Mort" schrieb :
    > Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:
    >
    >
    >> In your opinion, in mine it the mother lode of info on the OP's
    >> question.
    >>

    >
    > No, not just my opinion. Name one cooking school, teacher, expert,
    > etc, who uses Escoffier as a beginning text.
    >
    > You're the only one in the entire known universe.
    >

    Oh, the USA are the entire known universe to you.
    My condolences.

    > You don't use Escoffier as a beginning text for cooking the
    > same way you don't use Isaac Newton's "Principia Mathmatica" as
    > a beginning text for math and physics. Not in the 21st century.
    >

    Not in the USA, of course. Otherwise Joseph is right.

    > Of course they're great books (beyond great), but they're a
    > terrible way to try and learn basics.
    >

    Only for USAns, it seems.
    Hint : Basics don't include food processors and microwaves.

    'nuff said.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner


  18. #18
    Kent Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Prof Wonmug <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'd like to learn to make a few basic sauces. Can anyone recommend a
    >> good book?
    >>
    >> I'm no gourmet and I don't have a lot of spare time. I'd be willing to
    >> give up something in perfection for simplicity and shorter preparation
    >> time.
    >>
    >> Here are a couple I found on Amazon, arranged in the order that seems
    >> to fit my needs:
    >>
    >>
    >> 1. The Complete Book Of Sauces, Sallie Williams
    >>
    >> http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Book-...28603605/ref=s
    >> r_1_4?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1265777915&sr=1-4

    >
    > Good enough!
    >
    > Check your local library. If they don't have it, before you lay out
    > $12, go to B&N or the other big one and have a look-see. SEE for
    > yourself if the recipes look realistic for your needs and your skills.
    >
    > You don't say what you want to know or make, but I'll bet a big basic
    > cookbook (I'm thinking of Betty Crocker, Better Homes & Gardens,
    > Pillsbury--assuming they all still publish basic cookery books) will
    > provide what you need. Go to the sauces section and look at the
    > recipes. LOOK at at least four or five recipes and see what they all
    > have in common. A whisk? Do you have a whisk? Go to Target and get
    > one. A wood spoon? Lather, rinse, and repeat. :-)
    >
    > If you get the book for the library, MAKE 30-60 minutes to sit quietly
    > and read the introduction and several recipes that interest you. If you
    > find one that makes your mouth water, give it a go. It doesn't have to
    > be perfect. When I teach jamming, I recommend going through all the
    > physical motions before beginning -- are the ingredients prepared or at
    > the ready? Do I have all the necessary equipment at hand?
    >
    > You can do this.
    >
    > Best luck -- and let us know what came of it.
    >
    > --
    > -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    > http://web.me.com/barbschaller
    > Buffalo Chicken Quesadillas - pictures 2-7-2010
    >
    >

    Prof Wonmug was simply asking "whadya think" to the group. I assume he's
    done the above. I'm sure as well he knows how to read. It's allright to ask,
    "whadya think". That's what this NG is all about.

    Kent






  19. #19
    Mort Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?

    Michael Kuettner wrote:

    >
    > "Mort" schrieb :
    >
    >> Mr. Joseph Littleshoes Esq. wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> In your opinion, in mine it the mother lode of info on the OP's
    >>> question.
    >>>

    >>
    >> No, not just my opinion. Name one cooking school, teacher, expert,
    >> etc, who uses Escoffier as a beginning text.
    >>
    >> You're the only one in the entire known universe.
    >>

    > Oh, the USA are the entire known universe to you.
    > My condolences.
    >
    >> You don't use Escoffier as a beginning text for cooking the
    >> same way you don't use Isaac Newton's "Principia Mathmatica" as
    >> a beginning text for math and physics. Not in the 21st century.
    >>

    > Not in the USA, of course. Otherwise Joseph is right.
    >
    >> Of course they're great books (beyond great), but they're a
    >> terrible way to try and learn basics.
    >>

    > Only for USAns, it seems.
    > Hint : Basics don't include food processors and microwaves.


    Applause! What an outstanding display of ignorance in
    such a small space.

    You make a slew of assertions without providing even a hint
    of evidence or example. Then wrap it all in an array of
    anti-US contrivances, real or imagined.

    Hit and run, with emphasis on run.

    --
    Mort

  20. #20
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: What a good book on sauces?


    "Mort" schrieb :
    <snip>
    > Applause! What an outstanding display of ignorance in
    > such a small space.
    >

    No, I was trying to avoid the expression "you're an ignorant
    idiot."
    Could have saved myself the trouble.

    > You make a slew of assertions without providing even a hint
    > of evidence or example. Then wrap it all in an array of
    > anti-US contrivances, real or imagined.
    >

    Assertions ?
    Since Escoffier _does_ teach what Joseph said and
    you claimed that it was too difficult and unknown "in
    the entire known universe", it's obvious that you're
    a Merkin or of AngloSaxon stock, at least.
    The civilized world has no problems with his guide.

    > Hit and run, with emphasis on run.
    >

    Run ? My dear ignorant boy, I can slap you all day
    without any effort.

    Now go mix some ketchup and bought mayo and claim
    you know all about sauces.

    Michael Kuettner


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