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Thread: What is/are Dumplings?

  1. #1
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default What is/are Dumplings?

    On 12 May 2011 17:01:40 GMT, KenK wrote:

    > When I do it it's a more than 6 or 8. I must make smaller dumplings, And
    > while I'm at it, Since dumplings reheat fine, I make enough for all the
    > four meals the stew supplies, 40 to 50..


    I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has never made a "dumpling". I
    didn't even graduate Redneck Cornbread School.

    What IS a dumpling, really? The ones I knew were little itty bitty
    things that come in the circa 1988 Dinty Moore Chicken Stew in a 26
    ounce can. Or in a bag that are nothing more than thick egg noodles.
    It's simple pie crust thrown into stock, right? Nyeh.

    -sw

  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:1ofol7wvfya2a$.[email protected]..
    > On 12 May 2011 17:01:40 GMT, KenK wrote:
    >
    >> When I do it it's a more than 6 or 8. I must make smaller dumplings, And
    >> while I'm at it, Since dumplings reheat fine, I make enough for all the
    >> four meals the stew supplies, 40 to 50..

    >
    > I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has never made a "dumpling". I
    > didn't even graduate Redneck Cornbread School.
    >
    > What IS a dumpling, really? The ones I knew were little itty bitty
    > things that come in the circa 1988 Dinty Moore Chicken Stew in a 26
    > ounce can. Or in a bag that are nothing more than thick egg noodles.
    > It's simple pie crust thrown into stock, right? Nyeh.


    Of course there are variations but the ones I used to make were very similar
    to drop biscuits that you plop on top of your stew. They did have a bit
    more milk in them perhaps so the dough wasn't quite as firm as a biscuit.

    However there are other versions. I read a story once in the Good Old Days
    magazine about a young man who went traveling for work. This was during the
    depression. He would usually stay in the people's barn and take meals with
    the family. He said he couldn't understand why the chicken and dumplings
    were so different than the ones his mom and grandma made. Those people were
    making dumplings like mine. Like biscuits. His mom and grandma were using
    leftover pie dough cut in squares and served as dumplings.

    My MIL once made dumplings while I was there and hers were like thick
    noodles! She is Italian. So I don't know if that is what an Italian
    dumpling is or if she just thought it was. She could have some really weird
    ideas when it came to a lot of things. FIL didn't think they were actual
    dumplings. He thought they were noodles.

    However... Some years ago I used to buy some noodles that were called
    dumplings! They were sold dried with the noodles and I can't remember the
    exact name but it had "dumpling" in it. They were like thick, wide noodles.
    I used them for a casserole that I invented. It had all the leftover
    veggies I had in the fridge, whatever cheese ends I could get from the deli
    counter, a can of tomatoes, Italian seasoning and was dampened with whatever
    red wine I had open. This was something I made when I was broke and managed
    to find cheese ends. They weren't always available. Sometimes I would just
    use whatever cheese I had in the fridge. I served it to guests and
    everybody loved it.

    Then there is the Chinese dumpling. They might be steamed, baked or fried
    and usually have a filling in them. I believe Hum Bow falls under the
    category of dumpling.

    But I think if you're talking "dumpling" in this country, most people will
    think of the biscuit type like I made. Have made some similar gluten free
    ones that use rice flour and mashed potatoes. But the end result is the
    same.

    Remember the Campbell's Chicken and Dumpling soup? If was my brother's
    favorite. Thankfully we didn't have it often because it was more expensive
    than Chicken and Rice or Noodle. Those dumplings were tiny. Smaller than a
    walnut in the shell. Just bite sized. And freaking chewy! They would zing
    through your mouth, bouncing from tooth to tooth as you tried to chew them.
    When I had to serve our lunch, I would give him all of the dumplings and
    just take the broth.



  3. #3
    ViLco Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    Julie Bove wrote:

    > My MIL once made dumplings while I was there and hers were like thick
    > noodles! She is Italian. So I don't know if that is what an Italian
    > dumpling is or if she just thought it was. She could have some
    > really weird ideas when it came to a lot of things. FIL didn't think
    > they were actual dumplings. He thought they were noodles.


    If they were made of flour instead of potatoes they could have been
    "pizzicotti" ("pinches" in the sense of pinching someone's skin between two
    fingers): a ball of simple bread dough from which one just pinches out
    little pieces of dough and drops them in boiling water. This are more common
    in central Italy and are usually served with tomato sauces.
    Generally, in Italy dumplings ("gnocchi") are usually made with a potato
    based dough containing some flour, and sometimes egg: this dough gets rolled
    into 1/2" strings and then cut into 0.8" to 1" pieces and then boiled and
    drained. They are served in many ways depending on where you are: tomato
    sauce with shredded mozzarella and basil ("gnocchi alla Sorrentina") near
    Naples, with ragu' all over Italy where every area has a different ragu',
    including Naples, or with cheese sauces and, recently, even with fish.
    Basically there are endless ways to serve gnocchi.
    Another item called gnocchi is "gnocchi sardi" or "gnocchetti sardi"
    (malloreddus) and they're just another format of durum wheat pasta so I
    don't know why they got this name.
    Also canederli (knoedeln) in Süd-Tirol are part of the dumplings' family, be
    them bread based or potato based, often served as a side along with meat
    second courses.
    But then the word gnocchi (singular: gnocco) has been used for so many
    things... the local focaccia style here where I live, made of flour and pork
    shortening, is "gnocco al forno" (oven baked dumpling) and it gets out of
    the oven as a 0.5 x 1 meters piece, ready to be cut in single servings or as
    the custonmers request:
    http://www.lacuocapasticciona.com/20...nocco-chi.html
    But beware of the plural, since "gnocchi al forno" means oven baked
    dumplings:
    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_1Kbz8tu3rW...-h/gnocchi.jpg
    --
    ViLco
    Let the liquor do the thinking




  4. #4
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    On May 12, 10:25*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    > On 12 May 2011 17:01:40 GMT, KenK wrote:
    >
    > > When I do it it's a more than 6 or 8. I must make smaller dumplings, And
    > > while I'm at it, Since dumplings reheat fine, I make enough for all the
    > > four meals the stew supplies, 40 to 50..

    >
    > I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has never made a "dumpling". *I
    > didn't even graduate Redneck Cornbread School. *
    >
    > What IS a dumpling, really? *The ones I knew were little itty bitty
    > things that come in the circa 1988 Dinty Moore Chicken Stew in a 26
    > ounce can. *Or in a bag that are nothing more than thick egg noodles.
    > It's simple pie crust thrown into stock, right? *Nyeh.
    >


    These are the dumplings Grandma made (Griessnockerl):

    1/2 bunch of parsley, chopped fine
    100g Cream of Wheat (AKA semolina or farina)
    30g butter, melted
    1 egg
    salt
    pepper

    In a bowl combine all the ingredients, season with salt and pepper.
    Make the dumplings by taking a teaspoon of the mixture and rolling it
    into a ball. Toss (i.e. dump) into the boiling soup and boil for 5
    minutes.


  5. #5
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "ViLco" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:iqimij$53i$[email protected]..
    > Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> My MIL once made dumplings while I was there and hers were like thick
    >> noodles! She is Italian. So I don't know if that is what an Italian
    >> dumpling is or if she just thought it was. She could have some
    >> really weird ideas when it came to a lot of things. FIL didn't think
    >> they were actual dumplings. He thought they were noodles.

    >
    > If they were made of flour instead of potatoes they could have been
    > "pizzicotti" ("pinches" in the sense of pinching someone's skin between
    > two fingers): a ball of simple bread dough from which one just pinches out
    > little pieces of dough and drops them in boiling water. This are more
    > common in central Italy and are usually served with tomato sauces.


    They were made of flour, eggs and water, just like pasta. And she rolled
    out the dough then cut it in rectangles.

    > Generally, in Italy dumplings ("gnocchi") are usually made with a potato
    > based dough containing some flour, and sometimes egg: this dough gets
    > rolled into 1/2" strings and then cut into 0.8" to 1" pieces and then
    > boiled and drained. They are served in many ways depending on where you
    > are: tomato sauce with shredded mozzarella and basil ("gnocchi alla
    > Sorrentina") near Naples, with ragu' all over Italy where every area has a
    > different ragu', including Naples, or with cheese sauces and, recently,
    > even with fish. Basically there are endless ways to serve gnocchi.


    Yes, those had slipped my mind. Of course those are dumplings as well.

    > Another item called gnocchi is "gnocchi sardi" or "gnocchetti sardi"
    > (malloreddus) and they're just another format of durum wheat pasta so I
    > don't know why they got this name.
    > Also canederli (knoedeln) in Süd-Tirol are part of the dumplings' family,
    > be them bread based or potato based, often served as a side along with
    > meat second courses.
    > But then the word gnocchi (singular: gnocco) has been used for so many
    > things... the local focaccia style here where I live, made of flour and
    > pork shortening, is "gnocco al forno" (oven baked dumpling) and it gets
    > out of the oven as a 0.5 x 1 meters piece, ready to be cut in single
    > servings or as the custonmers request:
    > http://www.lacuocapasticciona.com/20...nocco-chi.html
    > But beware of the plural, since "gnocchi al forno" means oven baked
    > dumplings:
    > http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_1Kbz8tu3rW...-h/gnocchi.jpg


    Thanks!



  6. #6
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:01:36 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >They were made of flour, eggs and water, just like pasta. And she rolled
    >out the dough then cut it in rectangles.


    Those are made in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Known as pot pies..

    Christine
    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  7. #7
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "Christine Dabney" ha scritto nel messaggio
    "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>They were made of flour, eggs and water, just like pasta. And she rolled
    >>out the dough then cut it in rectangles.

    >
    > Those are made in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Known as pot pies..


    True and confusing. I accepted with delight an invitation to a fundraising
    supper of ham potpie. It would be new to me. It was thick ham gravy and
    the carb bomb of a lifetime. Mind you, I liked them!



  8. #8
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:01:36 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>They were made of flour, eggs and water, just like pasta. And she rolled
    >>out the dough then cut it in rectangles.

    >
    > Those are made in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Known as pot pies..


    Well she is in PA but not exactly the Dutch part. And she called them
    dumplings. I thought pot pie had at least an upper crust if not an upper
    and lower?



  9. #9
    Christine Dabney Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:41:57 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]. .
    >> On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:01:36 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:


    >Well she is in PA but not exactly the Dutch part. And she called them
    >dumplings. I thought pot pie had at least an upper crust if not an upper
    >and lower?
    >


    You don't have to be in PA Dutch country to cook their food.

    That is one version of pot pie.

    But the Amish (who are PA Dutch) call the pasta squares pot pies. I
    think it derives from either the Dutch or German language, from what I
    have read.

    Christine

    --
    http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com

  10. #10
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:41:57 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>"Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>news:[email protected] ..
    >>> On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:01:36 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >>Well she is in PA but not exactly the Dutch part. And she called them
    >>dumplings. I thought pot pie had at least an upper crust if not an upper
    >>and lower?
    >>

    >
    >You don't have to be in PA Dutch country to cook their food.
    >


    Thank god! I passed through there 40 years ago and picked up a
    couple cookbooks that I still go to for some real 'plain cookin' .
    Hearty food with a capital 'H'.

    >That is one version of pot pie.
    >
    > But the Amish (who are PA Dutch) call the pasta squares pot pies. I
    >think it derives from either the Dutch or German language, from what I
    >have read.
    >


    The PA Dutch-- are really PA Deutsch- so I would imagine German.

    Jim

  11. #11
    Jim Elbrecht Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 12 May 2011 17:01:40 GMT, KenK wrote:
    >
    >> When I do it it's a more than 6 or 8. I must make smaller dumplings, And
    >> while I'm at it, Since dumplings reheat fine, I make enough for all the
    >> four meals the stew supplies, 40 to 50..

    >
    >I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has never made a "dumpling". I
    >didn't even graduate Redneck Cornbread School.
    >
    >What IS a dumpling, really? The ones I knew were little itty bitty
    >things that come in the circa 1988 Dinty Moore Chicken Stew in a 26
    >ounce can. Or in a bag that are nothing more than thick egg noodles.
    >It's simple pie crust thrown into stock, right? Nyeh.


    To me it is more biscuit dough 'thrown into' any liquid. [and I
    note that pierogi and their lot are called dumplings, too]

    Jim

  12. #12
    Polly Esther Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "Jim Elbrecht" >
    > To me it is more biscuit dough 'thrown into' any liquid. [and I
    > note that pierogi and their lot are called dumplings, too]
    >
    > Jim

    My granny was a real Redneck, a descendant of Sitting Bull. Her
    notion of dumplings was a far cry from soggy raw puffs of dough. Her method
    was one of those 'first you kill the chickens'. She simmered the chickens
    and saved the fat to use in her dumplings. Rolled them paper thin.
    Probably killed off more than a few folks with that sort of cholesterol -
    but oh my they were wonderful. Polly


  13. #13
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:01:36 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>They were made of flour, eggs and water, just like pasta. And she rolled
    >>out the dough then cut it in rectangles.

    >
    > Those are made in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Known as pot pies..
    >
    > Christine
    > --
    > http://nightstirrings.blogspot.com



    Huh? Rolled dumplings aren't known as pot pies. And they're as common in
    the southern U.S. as they are in Pennsylvania.

    Jill


  14. #14
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Christine Dabney <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:41:57 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>>"Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>>news:[email protected] ...
    >>>> On Fri, 13 May 2011 01:01:36 -0700, "Julie Bove"
    >>>> <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>
    >>>Well she is in PA but not exactly the Dutch part. And she called them
    >>>dumplings. I thought pot pie had at least an upper crust if not an upper
    >>>and lower?
    >>>

    >>
    >>You don't have to be in PA Dutch country to cook their food.
    >>

    >
    > Thank god! I passed through there 40 years ago and picked up a
    > couple cookbooks that I still go to for some real 'plain cookin' .
    > Hearty food with a capital 'H'.
    >
    >>That is one version of pot pie.
    >>
    >> But the Amish (who are PA Dutch) call the pasta squares pot pies. I
    >>think it derives from either the Dutch or German language, from what I
    >>have read.
    >>

    >
    > The PA Dutch-- are really PA Deutsch- so I would imagine German.
    >
    > Jim



    Shall I ask my aunt (who grew up in Pennsylvania Dutch country - and her
    mother, my grandmother was German) what constitutes a dumpling? I don't
    think she calls it a pot pie. If she makes a pot of chicken & dumplings she
    might roll the dough (I prefer drop dumplings myself) she doesn't call it a
    pot pie. A pie has a crust. Rolled dumplings aren't crust; they're thicker
    and much more doughy than a pie crust.

    Jill


  15. #15
    jmcquown Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "Jim Elbrecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On 12 May 2011 17:01:40 GMT, KenK wrote:
    >>
    >>> When I do it it's a more than 6 or 8. I must make smaller dumplings, And
    >>> while I'm at it, Since dumplings reheat fine, I make enough for all the
    >>> four meals the stew supplies, 40 to 50..

    >>
    >>I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has never made a "dumpling". I
    >>didn't even graduate Redneck Cornbread School.
    >>
    >>What IS a dumpling, really? The ones I knew were little itty bitty
    >>things that come in the circa 1988 Dinty Moore Chicken Stew in a 26
    >>ounce can. Or in a bag that are nothing more than thick egg noodles.
    >>It's simple pie crust thrown into stock, right? Nyeh.

    >
    > To me it is more biscuit dough 'thrown into' any liquid. [and I
    > note that pierogi and their lot are called dumplings, too]
    >
    > Jim



    Exactly, it's biscuit dough. Sometimes rolled out and cut, sometimes
    dropped by teaspoonfuls, into hot bubbling liquid.

    Jill


  16. #16
    Lucille Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    On May 13, 3:34*am, spamtrap1888 <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > On May 12, 10:25*pm, Sqwertz <swe...@cluemail.compost> wrote:
    >
    > > On 12 May 2011 17:01:40 GMT, KenK wrote:

    >
    > > > When I do it it's a more than 6 or 8. I must make smaller dumplings, And
    > > > while I'm at it, Since dumplings reheat fine, I make enough for all the
    > > > four meals the stew supplies, 40 to 50..

    >
    > > I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has never made a "dumpling". *I
    > > didn't even graduate Redneck Cornbread School. *

    >
    > > What IS a dumpling, really? *The ones I knew were little itty bitty
    > > things that come in the circa 1988 Dinty Moore Chicken Stew in a 26
    > > ounce can. *Or in a bag that are nothing more than thick egg noodles.
    > > It's simple pie crust thrown into stock, right? *Nyeh.

    >
    > These are the dumplings Grandma made (Griessnockerl):
    >
    > 1/2 bunch of parsley, chopped fine
    > 100g Cream of Wheat (AKA semolina or farina)
    > 30g butter, melted
    > 1 egg
    > salt
    > pepper
    >
    > In a bowl combine all the ingredients, season with salt and pepper.
    > Make the dumplings by taking a teaspoon of the mixture and rolling it
    > into a ball. Toss (i.e. dump) into the boiling soup and boil for 5
    > minutes.



    I've never make dumplikng but ...............
    The dumplings I remember my mother making were more doughy then
    biscuit.
    They were about the size of a duck's egg. They sat on top of the
    stew that had lots of liquid/gravy.
    The top of the dumpling looked like steamed dough.

    Lucille




  17. #17
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?


    "jmcquown" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > "Christine Dabney" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    Those are made in Pennsylvania Dutch country. Known as pot pies..
    >>
    >> Christine


    > Huh? Rolled dumplings aren't known as pot pies. And they're as common in
    > the southern U.S. as they are in Pennsylvania.
    >
    > Jill


    Among the Amish they are.
    >




  18. #18
    Nunya Bidnits Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    Re: 1ofol7wvfya2a$.[email protected]
    Sqwertz <[email protected]> wrote:
    > On 12 May 2011 17:01:40 GMT, KenK wrote:
    >
    >> When I do it it's a more than 6 or 8. I must make smaller dumplings,
    >> And while I'm at it, Since dumplings reheat fine, I make enough for
    >> all the four meals the stew supplies, 40 to 50..

    >
    > I'm sure I'm not the only one here who has never made a "dumpling". I
    > didn't even graduate Redneck Cornbread School.
    >
    > What IS a dumpling, really? The ones I knew were little itty bitty
    > things that come in the circa 1988 Dinty Moore Chicken Stew in a 26
    > ounce can. Or in a bag that are nothing more than thick egg noodles.
    > It's simple pie crust thrown into stock, right? Nyeh.
    >
    > -sw


    Dumplings are big fluffy soft globes that cook in the chicken soup! I don't
    get the alleged :"dumplings" which resemble noodes. Not dumplings at all
    IMO.



  19. #19
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    On May 13, 5:50*am, "Giusi" <decob...@gmail.com> wrote:
    > "jmcquown" <j_mcqu...@comcast.net> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    > > "Christine Dabney" <artis...@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message

    >
    > Those are made in Pennsylvania Dutch country. *Known as pot pies..
    >
    >
    >
    > >> Christine

    > > Huh? *Rolled dumplings aren't known as pot pies. *And they're as common in
    > > the southern U.S. as they are in Pennsylvania.

    >
    > > Jill

    >
    > Among the Amish they are.
    >
    >


    There's a believable explanation here:

    http://chezpim.com/cook/pennsylvania-du

    Stew = Potpourri --> Bot Boi --> Pot Pie

    (B is voiced while P is unvoiced, and German speakers often confuse
    them. Then it would be Americanized over here.)

    Potpourri (a mixture, a blend) is still used in Austria for what
    Germans now call Eintopf, or One-pot, i.e. a one pot meal or stew.

    http://direktbersetzungeintopf.ostar...ngEintopf.html

  20. #20
    Dora Guest

    Default Re: What is/are Dumplings?

    Nunya Bidnits wrote:
    >
    > Dumplings are big fluffy soft globes that cook in the chicken soup!
    > I
    > don't get the alleged :"dumplings" which resemble noodes. Not
    > dumplings at all IMO.


    I agree on both counts. Spare me from those slimy, doughy, little
    globs. Big and fluffy on the top of a stew are what dumplings are all
    about.



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