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Thread: What to do with Plantain

  1. #1
    [email protected] Guest

    Default What to do with Plantain

    I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    how do I know when it's ripe?

    Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    (simple only, I'm no chef).


  2. #2
    George Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On 9/17/2010 6:44 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    > I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    > a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    > it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    > how do I know when it's ripe?
    >
    > Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    > (simple only, I'm no chef).
    >


    One of the easiest is to just peel it, slice it and saute in butter
    until soft.

  3. #3
    Steve Freides Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    [email protected] wrote:
    > I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    > a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    > it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    > how do I know when it's ripe?
    >
    > Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    > (simple only, I'm no chef).


    One could look this up - I didn't - but my memory is that frying is
    traditional in cultures where plantains are popular. I don't think
    they're just cut up and fried, though - some prep first, don't remember
    what.

    -S-



  4. #4
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain


  5. #5
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On 17/09/2010 7:34 AM, George wrote:
    > On 9/17/2010 6:44 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    >> I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    >> a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    >> it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    >> how do I know when it's ripe?
    >>
    >> Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    >> (simple only, I'm no chef).
    >>

    >
    > One of the easiest is to just peel it, slice it and saute in butter
    > until soft.


    I have seen a couple cooking shows where they sliced it, deep fried it,
    flattened the sliced pieces and then fried them again.

  6. #6
    l, not -l Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain


    On 17-Sep-2010, [email protected] wrote:

    > Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?


    Ingredients
    plantains
    vegetable oil
    Salt and freshly ground pepper
    Directions
    Peel and cut plantains 1-inch thick pieces
    Heat enough oil to cover plaintain pieces in a pan until hot, just below
    smoke point. Drop the plantain rounds into the hot oil a few at a time and
    cook until lightly browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Remove and drain.
    Set each fried plantain on a flat side and squash it as flat as you can with
    hand/pan/whatever. It should still be round, but thinner.
    Return the flattened plantain sections to the hot oil and cook until the
    entire surface is golden brown, about 2 minutes. Remove from oil, drain, and
    season to taste with salt and pepper. Serve hot.

    --
    Change Cujo to Juno in email address.

  7. #7
    Gorio Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain


    The traditional Latino way is similar to the two step cooking process
    for French fries.

    Cut plantain into 1/4-1/2 inch slices. Deep fry in corn oil at 300
    degrees for about 6-8 minutes. Remove. Mash each "coin" with something
    that will help flatten them out (I use a cleaver, like I'm mashing
    garlic cloves to get the skin off), boost the temp in the fryer to 350
    and throw them back in for 8-10 minutes. Hard to get used to fries after
    you've plantained.

    I noticed the Puerto Ricans in my old neighborhood liked to bake them. I
    like this, but have not tried to emulate the process.




    --
    Gorio

  8. #8
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On 9/17/2010 7:34 AM, George wrote:
    > On 9/17/2010 6:44 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    >> I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    >> a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    >> it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    >> how do I know when it's ripe?
    >>
    >> Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    >> (simple only, I'm no chef).
    >>

    >
    > One of the easiest is to just peel it, slice it and saute in butter
    > until soft.


    I would add to make sure the outside gets nice and brown and then
    I like to salt and pepper it lightly and splash a bit of hot sauce
    on the slices as I eat them. Yum!

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  9. #9
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On 9/17/2010 10:12 AM, Dave Smith wrote:
    > On 17/09/2010 7:34 AM, George wrote:
    >> On 9/17/2010 6:44 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    >>> I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    >>> a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    >>> it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    >>> how do I know when it's ripe?
    >>>
    >>> Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    >>> (simple only, I'm no chef).
    >>>

    >>
    >> One of the easiest is to just peel it, slice it and saute in butter
    >> until soft.

    >
    > I have seen a couple cooking shows where they sliced it, deep fried it,
    > flattened the sliced pieces and then fried them again.


    Yes, those are called "tostones" in Caribbean cuisine.
    They're wonderful. I think I've seen African recipes for
    something similar. Not surprising.
    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  10. #10
    aem Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On Sep 17, 3:44 am, j...@myplace.com wrote:
    > I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    > a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    > it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    > how do I know when it's ripe?
    >
    > Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    > (simple only, I'm no chef).


    Simplest is this. Slice it on the diagonal into 1" pieces. Melt some
    butter and olive oil (the combination can get hotter than butter alone
    without burning) in a pan over medium heat. Add the plaintain and fry
    about 4 minutes on each side, moving the slices around occasionally to
    prevent sticking. Drain on paper towels. Sprinkle with lemon juice
    and salt, eat as a side to your Cuban meal.

    If you like it, next time buy six of them on purpose. Really ripe
    ones, brownish-black. Fry them as above, then after you've removed
    them to drain, add 1/4 cup each of dark brown sugar and dark rum to
    the pan. Stir while the sugar dissolves and the mixture bubbles and
    thickens. When it's the thickness you want, after 5 - 8 minutes, add
    the plaintains back to warm, stir to coat, serve on a platter for
    dessert. -aem

  11. #11
    Stu Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On Fri, 17 Sep 2010 15:17:04 +0000, Gorio
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >The traditional Latino way is similar to the two step cooking process
    >for French fries.
    >
    >Cut plantain into 1/4-1/2 inch slices. Deep fry in corn oil at 300
    >degrees for about 6-8 minutes. Remove. Mash each "coin" with something
    >that will help flatten them out (I use a cleaver, like I'm mashing
    >garlic cloves to get the skin off), boost the temp in the fryer to 350
    >and throw them back in for 8-10 minutes. Hard to get used to fries after
    >you've plantained.
    >
    >I noticed the Puerto Ricans in my old neighborhood liked to bake them. I
    >like this, but have not tried to emulate the process.


    My son's girlfriend likes to bake them in a brown sugar/cloves/butter
    mixture, she's from Portugal.

  12. #12
    Nan Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On Sep 17, 6:44*am, j...@myplace.com wrote:
    > I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. *But there is
    > a sticker on it that says plantain. *I looked on the web and it said
    > it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. *But
    > how do I know when it's ripe? *
    >
    > Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    > (simple only, I'm no chef).


    Plantain is ripe when the skins get Black and soft and you're sure
    they are rotten. We always slice them 1/3" thick and then fry them in
    butter until they are browned and slightly black in spots. This is
    done in an iron skillet. No second cooking. Yummmmy. Our Mom was
    raised in Honduras, and there was always a bunch of plantain hanging
    right outside the kitchen door. They tell me I wanted it 3 times a day
    as a 4 yr old....and I still love it that much. Hard to find places to
    get it where it is not rock hard and will never ripen enough to eat
    it. I've found a Spanish Grocery that handles them at the right
    ripeness. Good Luck, Enjoy. Nan in DE.

  13. #13
    George Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On 9/17/2010 12:25 PM, Kate Connally wrote:
    > On 9/17/2010 7:34 AM, George wrote:
    >> On 9/17/2010 6:44 AM, [email protected] wrote:
    >>> I bought a plantain thinking it was just a huge banana. But there is
    >>> a sticker on it that says plantain. I looked on the web and it said
    >>> it should be cooked, but said it can be eaten raw when it's ripe. But
    >>> how do I know when it's ripe?
    >>>
    >>> Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    >>> (simple only, I'm no chef).
    >>>

    >>
    >> One of the easiest is to just peel it, slice it and saute in butter
    >> until soft.

    >
    > I would add to make sure the outside gets nice and brown and then
    > I like to salt and pepper it lightly and splash a bit of hot sauce
    > on the slices as I eat them. Yum!
    >
    > Kate
    >

    Yes, and I think that works best for green plantains. I think the yellow
    ones go better with butter/brown sugar/cinnamon/nutmeg

  14. #14
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    George wrote:

    > Yes, and I think that works best for green plantains. I think the yellow
    > ones go better with butter/brown sugar/cinnamon/nutmeg


    A friend of mine makes a dessert using yellow plantains with cashews fried
    in a spring-roll wrapper with a lime-caramel sauce. I'm not sure whether I
    have the recipe anywhere or not.

    Bob


  15. #15
    Roy Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On Sep 18, 7:50*pm, "Bob Terwilliger" <virtualgoth@die_spammer.biz>
    wrote:
    > George wrote:
    > > Yes, and I think that works best for green plantains. I think the yellow
    > > ones go better with butter/brown sugar/cinnamon/nutmeg

    >
    > A friend of mine makes a dessert using yellow plantains with cashews fried
    > in a spring-roll wrapper with a lime-caramel sauce. I'm not sure whether I
    > have the recipe anywhere or not.
    >
    > Bob


    ==
    People eat plantain? Would this be the same plantain that we have as a
    weed and can't get rid of? What grows in our garden is a miserable
    weed that I have battled for years.
    ==

  16. #16
    Bob Terwilliger Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    Roy wrote:

    > People eat plantain? Would this be the same plantain that we have as a
    > weed and can't get rid of? What grows in our garden is a miserable weed
    > that I have battled for years.


    It's a different plant altogether. The plantain under discussion here is a
    tropical fruit closely related to a banana.

    Bob


  17. #17
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just for the heck of it, what would be a simple method to cook it?
    >(simple only, I'm no chef).


    Pan fry plantain slices in olive oil, salt them, and top
    with your choice of sour cream, yogurt, soy yogurt or vanilla
    ice cream. For the first three of these choices, I mix
    in a little sugar.

    Steve


  18. #18
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: What to do with Plantain

    On Sat, 18 Sep 2010 22:08:58 -0700 (PDT), Roy <[email protected]>
    wrote:


    >> George wrote:
    >> > Yes, and I think that works best for green plantains. I think the yellow
    >> > ones go better with butter/brown sugar/cinnamon/nutmeg

    >
    >People eat plantain? Would this be the same plantain that we have as a
    >weed and can't get rid of? What grows in our garden is a miserable
    >weed that I have battled for years.


    Very different botanical... the plantain folks eat as a food is the
    name for the fruit, not the name of the plant... the plantain you
    refer to is a weed in a turf lawn and flower beds, in a meadow and
    other naturalized locations it is very desireable.
    http://www.examiner.com/gardening-in...-miracle-plant



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