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Thread: Weird food laws

  1. #1
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Weird food laws

    Okay so... The German guy posting about the shops being closed has got me
    to thinking. I honestly can't imagine *all* shops to be closed on Sunday
    but then I live in the US where we have little 24 hour places all over. And
    some of the supermarkets are even open 24 hours.

    But when we first moved to WA, meat could not be sold on Sunday. In the
    supermarkets, the meat had to be covered with white cloth. I am not sure
    about things like bologna. Perhaps it was just raw meat? Does anyone
    remember? I also think liquor could not be sold on Sundays. That has been
    done away with now at least for beer and wine. Not sure what is going to
    happen with our hard liquor now. The bill has passed to be able to sell it
    anywhere as of a certain date. Not sure when that is.

    So do you know of any weird food laws that used to be? Or still are?



  2. #2
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    Julie Bove wrote:
    > Okay so... The German guy posting about the shops being closed has
    > got me to thinking. I honestly can't imagine *all* shops to be
    > closed on Sunday but then I live in the US where we have little 24
    > hour places all over. And some of the supermarkets are even open 24
    > hours.
    > But when we first moved to WA, meat could not be sold on Sunday. In
    > the supermarkets, the meat had to be covered with white cloth. I am
    > not sure about things like bologna. Perhaps it was just raw meat? Does
    > anyone remember? I also think liquor could not be sold on
    > Sundays. That has been done away with now at least for beer and
    > wine. Not sure what is going to happen with our hard liquor now. The bill
    > has passed to be able to sell it anywhere as of a certain
    > date. Not sure when that is.
    > So do you know of any weird food laws that used to be? Or still are?


    Also, liquor can't be sold after 2:00 a.m. here but I don't know at what
    hour in the morning it is legal to sell it again.



  3. #3
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jfits0$4fu$[email protected]..
    >
    > "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:23:03 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Also, liquor can't be sold after 2:00 a.m. here but I don't know at what
    >>> hour in the morning it is legal to sell it again.

    >>
    >> They have to stop selling at 2AM here too... and they can open at 6AM.
    >> Not sure why they have to be "dry" 4 hours, seems silly to me.

    >
    > Yeah. It does seem silly.


    Well consider Sarah Palin as mayor of Wasilla changed the liquor laws to
    allow booze to be sold up till 5:00am. And DUIs skyrocketed and the number
    of alcohol related vehicle accidents did too as people commuting to work
    were endangered by drunk drivers.

    Some laws just make sense no matter how silly they seem on the outside.

    Paul



  4. #4
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsf5hqm7iib2z$.[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:10:48 -0800, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> So do you know of any weird food laws that used to be? Or still are?

    >
    > Since you mentioned alcohol: No beer above 5%. All bars must serve
    > hard alcohol from airline bottles. The public may not purchase airline
    > bottles at retail stores.
    >
    > South Carolina.
    >


    Well we know it ain't Texas. "Can I get you a .45 auto with your vodka
    stinger and beer chaser? We've got a special on hollow point teflon
    jacketed bullets tonight."

    Paul



  5. #5
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jfitr8$4db$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > newsf5hqm7iib2z$.[email protected]..
    >> On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:10:48 -0800, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>
    >>> So do you know of any weird food laws that used to be? Or still are?

    >>
    >> Since you mentioned alcohol: No beer above 5%. All bars must serve
    >> hard alcohol from airline bottles. The public may not purchase airline
    >> bottles at retail stores.
    >>
    >> South Carolina.

    >
    > Interesting! Thanks! I had forgotten about the beer thing. Ours must be
    > under a certain percent too. We once went to a bar in Baltimore and I got
    > a beer. I am not sure why because I am not really a beer drinker. My
    > husband commented that I needed to take it easy because the beer was a
    > stronger percentage than I was used to. And I can attest to that. Never
    > again.


    Beer is regulated at the federal level. Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    labelled and taxed as liquor. What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of lobbying than
    anything else.

    > I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for them
    > when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor store. But
    > I could get them at the military store in MA.


    Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year. I
    happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.

    Paul



  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:23:03 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Also, liquor can't be sold after 2:00 a.m. here but I don't know at what
    > hour in the morning it is legal to sell it again.


    They have to stop selling at 2AM here too... and they can open at 6AM.
    Not sure why they have to be "dry" 4 hours, seems silly to me.

    --

    Tell congress not to censor the web. Add your voice here.
    https://www.google.com/landing/takeaction/

  7. #7
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    newsf5hqm7iib2z$.[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:10:48 -0800, Julie Bove wrote:
    >
    >> So do you know of any weird food laws that used to be? Or still are?

    >
    > Since you mentioned alcohol: No beer above 5%. All bars must serve
    > hard alcohol from airline bottles. The public may not purchase airline
    > bottles at retail stores.
    >
    > South Carolina.


    Interesting! Thanks! I had forgotten about the beer thing. Ours must be
    under a certain percent too. We once went to a bar in Baltimore and I got a
    beer. I am not sure why because I am not really a beer drinker. My husband
    commented that I needed to take it easy because the beer was a stronger
    percentage than I was used to. And I can attest to that. Never again.

    I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for them when
    I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor store. But I could
    get them at the military store in MA.



  8. #8
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:23:03 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Also, liquor can't be sold after 2:00 a.m. here but I don't know at what
    >> hour in the morning it is legal to sell it again.

    >
    > They have to stop selling at 2AM here too... and they can open at 6AM.
    > Not sure why they have to be "dry" 4 hours, seems silly to me.


    Yeah. It does seem silly.



  9. #9
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jfiuo9$7m1$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:jfits0$4fu$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "sf" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:23:03 -0800, "Julie Bove"
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Also, liquor can't be sold after 2:00 a.m. here but I don't know at
    >>>> what
    >>>> hour in the morning it is legal to sell it again.
    >>>
    >>> They have to stop selling at 2AM here too... and they can open at 6AM.
    >>> Not sure why they have to be "dry" 4 hours, seems silly to me.

    >>
    >> Yeah. It does seem silly.

    >
    > Well consider Sarah Palin as mayor of Wasilla changed the liquor laws to
    > allow booze to be sold up till 5:00am. And DUIs skyrocketed and the
    > number of alcohol related vehicle accidents did too as people commuting to
    > work were endangered by drunk drivers.
    >
    > Some laws just make sense no matter how silly they seem on the outside.


    Ohhhhhhhhhh! I hadn't thought of that. However the silly thing is, if you
    already own it, you can drink it.



  10. #10
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    On Jan 22, 9:53*pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:

    > Beer is regulated at the federal level.


    Yes, and at the state level.

    > Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    > labelled and taxed as liquor.


    No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale, stout,
    porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care. (The feds
    come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to be fermented
    at higher temperatures than lagers.)

    > What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    > does not have the same restriction. *That's more an example of lobbyingthan
    > anything else.


    It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5% alcohol
    by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The famous "3.2"
    that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was 3.2% by weight,
    or 4% by volume.

    (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages, because
    even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they set the
    limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted to 3.2%
    once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)

    >
    > > I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. *I did look for them
    > > when I used to make fruitcake. *Didn't see them at the liquor store. *But
    > > I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >
    > Just get a regular bottle. *It keeps forever. *Use it year after year.. *I
    > happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. *Yum.
    >


    Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a half-pint.


  11. #11
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "Paul M. Cook" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jfivh3$a4l$[email protected]..
    >
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:jfitr8$4db$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "Sqwertz" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> newsf5hqm7iib2z$.[email protected]..
    >>> On Sun, 22 Jan 2012 21:10:48 -0800, Julie Bove wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> So do you know of any weird food laws that used to be? Or still are?
    >>>
    >>> Since you mentioned alcohol: No beer above 5%. All bars must serve
    >>> hard alcohol from airline bottles. The public may not purchase airline
    >>> bottles at retail stores.
    >>>
    >>> South Carolina.

    >>
    >> Interesting! Thanks! I had forgotten about the beer thing. Ours must
    >> be under a certain percent too. We once went to a bar in Baltimore and I
    >> got a beer. I am not sure why because I am not really a beer drinker.
    >> My husband commented that I needed to take it easy because the beer was a
    >> stronger percentage than I was used to. And I can attest to that. Never
    >> again.

    >
    > Beer is regulated at the federal level. Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    > labelled and taxed as liquor. What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet
    > it does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of lobbying
    > than anything else.
    >
    >> I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for them
    >> when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor store. But
    >> I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >
    > Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year. I
    > happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.


    That's what I wound up doing. I didn't want to have to store it because my
    kitchen at the time had no cupboards. It was a weird apartment.



  12. #12
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >
    >> Beer is regulated at the federal level.

    >
    > Yes, and at the state level.
    >
    >> Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    >> labelled and taxed as liquor.

    >
    > No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    > liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale, stout,
    > porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care. (The feds
    > come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to be fermented
    > at higher temperatures than lagers.)
    >
    >> What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    >> does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of
    >> lobbying than anything else.

    >
    > It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    > ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    > (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5% alcohol
    > by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The famous "3.2"
    > that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was 3.2% by weight,
    > or 4% by volume.
    >
    > (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages, because
    > even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they set the
    > limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted to 3.2%
    > once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)
    >
    >>
    >>> I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for
    >>> them when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor
    >>> store. But I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >>
    >> Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year.
    >> I happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.
    >>

    >
    > Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    > ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a half-pint.
    >

    Hmmm... Interesting!



  13. #13
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    On Jan 22, 9:10*pm, "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote:
    > Okay so... *The German guy posting about the shops being closed has gotme
    > to thinking. *I honestly can't imagine *all* shops to be closed on Sunday
    > but then I live in the US where we have little 24 hour places all over. *And
    > some of the supermarkets are even open 24 hours.


    Canada was worse. Camping in Ontario years ago, we tried to buy
    provisions only to find that the supermarkets had closed for the
    weekend. Stores at that time could not be open on Sundays, but there
    was an exception for convenience stores that sold milk, to prevent
    children's suffering.

    IIRC, there is an exception to the German law in that groceries in
    train stations are allowed to operate on Sundays, because travellers
    are away from home and must have access to food. (This sounds insane
    reading it now, yet I believe it is true.)

    >
    > But when we first moved to WA, meat could not be sold on Sunday. *In the
    > supermarkets, the meat had to be covered with white cloth. *I am not sure
    > about things like bologna. *Perhaps it was just raw meat? *Does anyone
    > remember?


    The meatcutters union had a provision in their contract that fresh
    meat could not be sold unless they were there to supervise. I guess
    they were hoping for either more jobs or some overtime. The meat cases
    were covered before they went home to prevent temptation.

  14. #14
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:

    > Beer is regulated at the federal level.


    Yes, and at the state level.

    > Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    > labelled and taxed as liquor.


    No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale, stout,
    porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care. (The feds
    come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to be fermented
    at higher temperatures than lagers.)

    ---------

    Being a beer brewer I disagree. Ales, stouts and porters brew at warmer
    temperatures because they use different yeasts. Lager yeasts ferments on
    the bottom of the tank at temperatures in the 30s where ale yeasts are top
    fermenting at around 62-68F. They produce much different products. Ales,
    stouts and porters are entirely different especially in the yeast they use.
    It's not a government creation. You can extract as much alcohol from a
    lager or a pilsener than you can an ale. It all depends on the yeast's
    alcohol tolerance and the amount of fermentables. I have brewed lagers in
    the 8% range.

    --------

    > What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    > does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of lobbying
    > than
    > anything else.


    It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5% alcohol
    by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The famous "3.2"
    that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was 3.2% by weight,
    or 4% by volume.

    --------

    I was referring to the exclusion of wine and its ratio of taxation compared
    to brewed beverages. Wine is not taxed like beer is on its alcohol volume.
    Wine is taxed at a flat rate even if it is fortified wine. It's not fair
    and beer drinkers have complained for ages about it.

    ---------

    (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages, because
    even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they set the
    limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted to 3.2%
    once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)

    >
    > > I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for them
    > > when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor store. But
    > > I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >
    > Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year. I
    > happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.
    >


    Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a half-pint.

    --------------

    You're doing something wrong. Kept right it never spoils. It never really
    changes much unless you are talking maybe 3 or 4 decades. I've tasted
    opened bottles of Scotch from the 80s that tasted like they were just
    opened. They never age or improve though like wine does.

    Paul



  15. #15
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:jfj26r$jae$[email protected]..
    > spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >> On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Beer is regulated at the federal level.

    >>
    >> Yes, and at the state level.
    >>
    >>> Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    >>> labelled and taxed as liquor.

    >>
    >> No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    >> liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale, stout,
    >> porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care. (The feds
    >> come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to be fermented
    >> at higher temperatures than lagers.)
    >>
    >>> What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    >>> does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of
    >>> lobbying than anything else.

    >>
    >> It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    >> ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    >> (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5% alcohol
    >> by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The famous "3.2"
    >> that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was 3.2% by weight,
    >> or 4% by volume.
    >>
    >> (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages, because
    >> even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they set the
    >> limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted to 3.2%
    >> once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)
    >>
    >>>
    >>>> I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for
    >>>> them when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor
    >>>> store. But I could get them at the military store in MA.
    >>>
    >>> Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year.
    >>> I happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.
    >>>

    >>
    >> Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    >> ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a half-pint.
    >>

    > Hmmm... Interesting!



    Not really. mostly all wrong.

    Paul



  16. #16
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    On Jan 23, 12:21*am, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:jfj26r$jae$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > >> On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:

    >
    > >>> Beer is regulated at the federal level.

    >
    > >> Yes, and at the state level.

    >
    > >>> Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    > >>> labelled and taxed as liquor.

    >
    > >> No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    > >> liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale, stout,
    > >> porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care. (The feds
    > >> come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to be fermented
    > >> at higher temperatures than lagers.)

    >
    > >>> What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    > >>> does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of
    > >>> lobbying than anything else.

    >
    > >> It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    > >> ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    > >> (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5% alcohol
    > >> by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The famous "3.2"
    > >> that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was 3.2% by weight,
    > >> or 4% by volume.

    >
    > >> (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages, because
    > >> even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they set the
    > >> limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted to 3.2%
    > >> once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)

    >
    > >>>> I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for
    > >>>> them when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor
    > >>>> store. But I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >
    > >>> Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year.
    > >>> I happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.

    >
    > >> Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    > >> ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a half-pint.

    >
    > > Hmmm... *Interesting!

    >
    > Not really. *mostly all wrong.
    >


    Are you sure you're not Brokelyn posting under another name?


  17. #17
    Paul M. Cook Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws


    "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    On Jan 23, 12:21 am, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:jfj26r$jae$[email protected]..
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > > spamtrap1888 wrote:
    > >> On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:

    >
    > >>> Beer is regulated at the federal level.

    >
    > >> Yes, and at the state level.

    >
    > >>> Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    > >>> labelled and taxed as liquor.

    >
    > >> No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    > >> liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale, stout,
    > >> porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care. (The feds
    > >> come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to be fermented
    > >> at higher temperatures than lagers.)

    >
    > >>> What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    > >>> does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of
    > >>> lobbying than anything else.

    >
    > >> It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    > >> ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    > >> (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5% alcohol
    > >> by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The famous "3.2"
    > >> that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was 3.2% by weight,
    > >> or 4% by volume.

    >
    > >> (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages, because
    > >> even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they set the
    > >> limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted to 3.2%
    > >> once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)

    >
    > >>>> I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for
    > >>>> them when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor
    > >>>> store. But I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >
    > >>> Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year.
    > >>> I happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.

    >
    > >> Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    > >> ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a half-pint.

    >
    > > Hmmm... Interesting!

    >
    > Not really. mostly all wrong.
    >


    Are you sure you're not Brokelyn posting under another name?


    F&^*k yeah, a&^S^%(e! You can just &^(S my ^%#^ you *#&$^$R* and while
    you're at it * #%#%#& my @&$%@$ and (*(*))!

    Paul



  18. #18
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    On Jan 23, 12:21*am, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    > "spamtrap1888" <spamtrap1...@gmail.com> wrote in message
    >
    > news:[email protected]...
    > On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >
    > > Beer is regulated at the federal level.

    >
    > Yes, and at the state level.
    >
    > > Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    > > labelled and taxed as liquor.

    >
    > No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    > liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale, stout,
    > porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care. (The feds
    > come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to be fermented
    > at higher temperatures than lagers.)
    >
    > ---------
    >
    > Being a beer brewer I disagree. *Ales, stouts and porters brew at warmer
    > temperatures because they use different yeasts. *Lager yeasts ferments on
    > the bottom of the tank at temperatures in the 30s where ale yeasts are top
    > fermenting at around 62-68F. *They produce much different products. *Ales,
    > stouts and porters are entirely different especially in the yeast they use.
    > It's not a government creation. *You can extract as much alcohol from a
    > lager or a pilsener than you can an ale. *It all depends on the yeast's
    > alcohol tolerance and the amount of fermentables. *I have brewed lagersin
    > the 8% range.


    I'm outlining the law on labeling strong beers for you. The words used
    to indicate a strong beer are determined by individual states. But the
    federal law won't let you call a lager an ale. Capisce?

    And get a real newsreader that quotes properly.
    >
    > --------
    >
    > > What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    > > does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of lobbying
    > > than
    > > anything else.

    >
    > It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    > ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    > (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5% alcohol
    > by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The famous "3.2"
    > that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was 3.2% by weight,
    > or 4% by volume.
    >
    > --------
    >
    > I was referring to the exclusion of wine and its ratio of taxation compared
    > to brewed beverages. *Wine is not taxed like beer is on its alcohol volume.
    > Wine is taxed at a flat rate even if it is fortified wine. *It's not fair
    > and beer drinkers have complained for ages about it.
    >


    This is completely wrong, not to mention ass-backwards. Kindly
    familiarize yourself with the state and federal excise taxes for wine
    and beer. You will see that wine is taxed on its alcohol volume while
    beer seldom is. I have included links for your education:

    http://www.taxadmin.org/fta/rate/tax_stru.html#Excise
    http://www.ttb.gov/tax_audit/taxguide.shtml#one
    http://www.ttb.gov/beer/tax.shtml

    > ---------
    >
    > (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages, because
    > even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they set the
    > limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted to 3.2%
    > once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)
    >
    >
    >
    > > > I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for them
    > > > when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor store. But
    > > > I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >
    > > Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after year. I
    > > happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.

    >
    > Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    > ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a half-pint.
    >
    > --------------
    >
    > You're doing something wrong. *Kept right it never spoils. *It never really
    > changes much unless you are talking maybe 3 or 4 decades. *I've tasted
    > opened bottles of Scotch from the 80s that tasted like they were just
    > opened. *They never age or improve though like wine does.
    >


    Interesting you can't detect the changes.


  19. #19
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    Paul M. Cook wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:jfj26r$jae$[email protected]..
    >> spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >>> On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Beer is regulated at the federal level.
    >>>
    >>> Yes, and at the state level.
    >>>
    >>>> Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    >>>> labelled and taxed as liquor.
    >>>
    >>> No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled "malt
    >>> liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled "ale,
    >>> stout, porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't care.
    >>> (The feds come into play by requiring beers labeled ale, etc. to to
    >>> be fermented at higher temperatures than lagers.)
    >>>
    >>>> What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    >>>> does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of
    >>>> lobbying than anything else.
    >>>
    >>> It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    >>> ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    >>> (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5%
    >>> alcohol by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The
    >>> famous "3.2" that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was
    >>> 3.2% by weight, or 4% by volume.
    >>>
    >>> (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages,
    >>> because even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they
    >>> set the limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted
    >>> to 3.2% once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)
    >>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for
    >>>>> them when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor
    >>>>> store. But I could get them at the military store in MA.
    >>>>
    >>>> Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after
    >>>> year. I happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened years
    >>> ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a
    >>> half-pint.

    >> Hmmm... Interesting!

    >
    >
    > Not really. mostly all wrong.


    Well, I am watching that celebrity cooking show on Food Network and Lou
    Diamond Phillips said one must taste the bourbon to make sure it isn't bad.



  20. #20
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Weird food laws

    Paul M. Cook wrote:
    > "spamtrap1888" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > On Jan 23, 12:21 am, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:
    >> "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:jfj26r$jae$[email protected]..
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>> spamtrap1888 wrote:
    >>>> On Jan 22, 9:53 pm, "Paul M. Cook" <pmc...@gte.net> wrote:

    >>
    >>>>> Beer is regulated at the federal level.

    >>
    >>>> Yes, and at the state level.

    >>
    >>>>> Any beer over 5% alcohol is
    >>>>> labelled and taxed as liquor.

    >>
    >>>> No. Some states require beers over X% of alcohol to be labeled
    >>>> "malt liquor." Other states give a pass to strong beers labeled
    >>>> "ale, stout, porter," etc. The feds (formerly ATF, now TTB) don't
    >>>> care. (The feds come into play by requiring beers labeled ale,
    >>>> etc. to to be fermented at higher temperatures than lagers.)

    >>
    >>>>> What makes it odd is wine is 11-13% an yet it
    >>>>> does not have the same restriction. That's more an example of
    >>>>> lobbying than anything else.

    >>
    >>>> It's more of an act of God than anything else. If you ferment fully
    >>>> ripe grapes, the resulting beverage will be 11 to 17% alcohol
    >>>> (assuming the yeast don't die first). Beer is traditionally 5%
    >>>> alcohol by volume, although light beers contain less alcohol. The
    >>>> famous "3.2" that was the first legal beer after Prohibition, was
    >>>> 3.2% by weight, or 4% by volume.

    >>
    >>>> (The Volstead Act made an exception for low alcohol beverages,
    >>>> because even fruit juices can contain 0.5% alcohol. Therefore they
    >>>> set the limit of allowable alcohol at 0.5%. This limit was boosted
    >>>> to 3.2% once the 21st Amendment started to show traction.)

    >>
    >>>>>> I don't think we can get the airline bottles here. I did look for
    >>>>>> them when I used to make fruitcake. Didn't see them at the liquor
    >>>>>> store. But I could get them at the military store in MA.

    >>
    >>>>> Just get a regular bottle. It keeps forever. Use it year after
    >>>>> year. I happen to really like fruitcake soaked in rum. Yum.

    >>
    >>>> Not the bottles of booze I have had. Bottles that I had opened
    >>>> years ago seemed to have lost both flavor and alcohol. I'd get a
    >>>> half-pint.

    >>
    >>> Hmmm... Interesting!

    >>
    >> Not really. mostly all wrong.
    >>

    >
    > Are you sure you're not Brokelyn posting under another name?
    >
    >
    > F&^*k yeah, a&^S^%(e! You can just &^(S my ^%#^ you *#&$^$R* and
    > while you're at it * #%#%#& my @&$%@$ and (*(*))!


    What? No mention of boobs?



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