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Thread: washing corriander before refridgerating

  1. #1
    john d hamilton Guest

    Default washing corriander before refridgerating

    Does washing fresh corriander before putting into the fridge remove some of
    the flavour?

    it saves getting all that sand in the fridge.. some say it does some say it
    doesn't lose flavour.



  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    john wrote on Sat, 13 Sep 2008 12:54:08 +0100:

    > Does washing fresh corriander before putting into the fridge
    > remove some of the flavour?


    > it saves getting all that sand in the fridge.. some say it
    > does some say it doesn't lose flavour.


    I guess you are talking about what I would call cilantro. I keep it in a
    plastic bag in the fridge and, whether or not you wash it, my impression
    is that it keeps better if allowed to thoroughly dry before
    refrigerating. I don't think you can wash off the flavor unless you use
    soap!

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  3. #3
    Sqwertz Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    john d hamilton <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Does washing fresh corriander before putting into the fridge remove some of
    > the flavour?


    Heck no. You have to rinse it several times.

    -sw

  4. #4
    [email protected] Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    On Sat, 13 Sep 2008 08:10:06 -0500, Sqwertz <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >john d hamilton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Does washing fresh corriander before putting into the fridge remove some of
    >> the flavour?

    >
    >Heck no. You have to rinse it several times.
    >
    >-sw


    If for no other reason than to get any residual grit/dirt in which it
    has been grown off it.

    Once washed, I put it in a clean teacloth loosely bunched up and swing
    it around a bit to get rid of the water before freezing. I guess that
    a salad spinner might work too. Must try that sometime.

    Regards
    JonH

  5. #5
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    [email protected] wrote on Sat, 13 Sep 2008 13:52:48 GMT:

    >> john d hamilton <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Does washing fresh corriander before putting into the fridge
    >>> remove some of the flavour?

    >>
    >> Heck no. You have to rinse it several times.
    >>
    >> -sw


    > If for no other reason than to get any residual grit/dirt in
    > which it has been grown off it.


    > Once washed, I put it in a clean teacloth loosely bunched up
    > and swing it around a bit to get rid of the water before
    > freezing. I guess that a salad spinner might work too. Must
    > try that sometime.


    I should mention that I don't freeze cilantro. It's not worth the
    trouble since it keeps for a week at normal refrigerator temperature and
    I can buy a fair sized bunch for 50 or 60 cents (US). What I wish I
    could do is reliably find it with roots, which add to several Vietnamese
    and Thai recipes.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  6. #6
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    James Silverton wrote:

    > I guess you are talking about what I would call cilantro. I keep it in a
    > plastic bag in the fridge and, whether or not you wash it, my impression
    > is that it keeps better if allowed to thoroughly dry before
    > refrigerating. I don't think you can wash off the flavor unless you use
    > soap!


    Some people already think that cilantro tastes like soap :-)



  7. #7
    stark Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    On Sep 13, 8:58*am, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    wrote:
    > I should mention that I don't freeze cilantro. It's not worth the
    > trouble since it keeps for a week at normal refrigerator temperature and
    > I can buy a fair sized bunch for 50 or 60 cents (US). What I wish I
    > could do is reliably find it with roots, which add to several Vietnamese
    > and Thai recipes.
    >


    The cilantro I buy is far more perishable than parsley, usually
    turning to glop in 3 to 4 days. But some of the flat leaf parsley is
    as tough as thin cardboard. It's gotten so I have to shop for parsley
    and some weeks all purveyors are selling the same tough stuff. Ah me.


  8. #8
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    In article <48cbd961$0$7380$[email protected]>,
    Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:

    > James Silverton wrote:
    >
    > > I guess you are talking about what I would call cilantro. I keep it in a
    > > plastic bag in the fridge and, whether or not you wash it, my impression
    > > is that it keeps better if allowed to thoroughly dry before
    > > refrigerating. I don't think you can wash off the flavor unless you use
    > > soap!

    >
    > Some people already think that cilantro tastes like soap :-)


    Which could re-start some very old threads. <g>
    It's a genetic thing...

    I can't stand cilantro for that very reason!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed." --Mark Twain

  9. #9
    Sheldon Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    On Sep 13, 11:32�am, stark <starkra...@bellsouth.net> wrote:
    > On Sep 13, 8:58�am, "James Silverton" <not.jim.silver...@verizon.not>
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I should mention that I don't freeze cilantro. It's not worth the
    > > trouble since it keeps for a week at normal refrigerator temperature and
    > > I can buy a fair sized bunch for 50 or 60 cents (US). What I wish I
    > > could do is reliably find it with roots, which add to several Vietnamese
    > > and Thai recipes.

    >
    > The cilantro I buy is far more perishable than parsley, usually
    > turning to glop in 3 to 4 days. But some of the flat leaf parsley is
    > as tough as thin cardboard. It's gotten so I have to shop for parsley
    > and some weeks all purveyors are selling the same tough stuff. Ah me.


    Why don't yoose all grow your own... cilantro and parsley are about
    the easiest plants to grow... 1 sq ft of ground is more than enough to
    grow all a big family can possibly use. You can grow it in pots too
    but it does much better in the ground. I prefer curly leaf parsley so
    that's all I grow... I don't care much for flat leaf and to me
    cilantro tastes like Octagon soap. I've been snipping parsley from my
    little patch all summer and since it grows faster than I can use it I
    now have more than enough to freeze for all winter... I pull up the
    roots, clean and freeze those too, excellent for stock.

    Parsley is a biennial, the root will send up leaves the next year but
    they will be malformed and taste funny, it's best to grow new each
    year.

    A problem with growing herbs in pots is that they need to be in full
    sun and so the pots get very hot and the plant's roots cook... they'll
    grow if kept well watered but planted directly in the ground you'll
    havest ten times as much and far better quality. My parsley patch is
    handy for snipping right outside my back door alongside my deck.

    Curly leaf parsley, and below is the reason for the fence:
    http://i34.tinypic.com/333k56t.jpg

    Resident bagel moochers yesterday dusk:
    http://i33.tinypic.com/10h936u.jpg

    Visiting moochers right now:
    http://i38.tinypic.com/900f2g.jpg
    http://i36.tinypic.com/20pvuht.jpg



  10. #10
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    James Silverton wrote:


    >
    > I should mention that I don't freeze cilantro. It's not worth the
    > trouble since it keeps for a week at normal refrigerator temperature
    > and I can buy a fair sized bunch for 50 or 60 cents (US). What I wish
    > I could do is reliably find it with roots, which add to several
    > Vietnamese and Thai recipes.
    >


    We can get coriander (cilantro) with roots and all here at several
    veggie places I shop at. Wish I could send you some ;-)
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Google is my Friend (GIMF)

  11. #11
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    Omelet wrote:

    > In article <48cbd961$0$7380$[email protected]>,
    > Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >> Some people already think that cilantro tastes like soap :-)

    >
    > Which could re-start some very old threads. <g>
    > It's a genetic thing...
    >
    > I can't stand cilantro for that very reason!


    I'll take your share of cilantro and you can have my share of
    cabbage ;-)
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Google is my Friend (GIMF)

  12. #12
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    In article <gagsk6$ocr$[email protected]>,
    ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Omelet wrote:
    >
    > > In article <48cbd961$0$7380$[email protected]>,
    > > Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> Some people already think that cilantro tastes like soap :-)

    > >
    > > Which could re-start some very old threads. <g>
    > > It's a genetic thing...
    > >
    > > I can't stand cilantro for that very reason!

    >
    > I'll take your share of cilantro and you can have my share of
    > cabbage ;-)


    Deal! <g>

    Ever had stuffed cabbage leaves?

    http://i38.tinypic.com/vzdatl.jpg
    http://i38.tinypic.com/qqa1km.jpg

    Granted, regular steamed tends to be boring... but this is stuffed Napa
    which is milder and does not stink when you are steaming it. <g>
    --
    Peace! Om

    "If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed." --Mark Twain

  13. #13
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    Omelet wrote:

    > In article <gagsk6$ocr$[email protected]>,
    > ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> Omelet wrote:
    >>
    >> > In article <48cbd961$0$7380$[email protected]>,
    >> > Dave Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >> Some people already think that cilantro tastes like soap :-)
    >> >
    >> > Which could re-start some very old threads. <g>
    >> > It's a genetic thing...
    >> >
    >> > I can't stand cilantro for that very reason!

    >>
    >> I'll take your share of cilantro and you can have my share of
    >> cabbage ;-)

    >
    > Deal! <g>
    >
    > Ever had stuffed cabbage leaves?
    >
    > http://i38.tinypic.com/vzdatl.jpg
    > http://i38.tinypic.com/qqa1km.jpg
    >
    > Granted, regular steamed tends to be boring... but this is stuffed
    > Napa which is milder and does not stink when you are steaming it. <g>


    It does look pretty good, hafta admit. As do Steve's cabbage rolls...

    I think I might ask Dad to make some (he loves cabbage) and has talked
    about making some 'stuffed cabbage leaves' for a while. Heck, I ate a
    few mouthfuls of his 'special' cabbage and didn't die - altho' I can't
    say I enjoyed it.

    Worst case scenario: I can leave the cabbage and eat the stuffing...
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty (martyr) Cathy

    Google is my Friend (GIMF)

  14. #14
    Omelet Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    In article <gagtjv$vsd$[email protected]>,
    ChattyCathy <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > > Ever had stuffed cabbage leaves?
    > >
    > > http://i38.tinypic.com/vzdatl.jpg
    > > http://i38.tinypic.com/qqa1km.jpg
    > >
    > > Granted, regular steamed tends to be boring... but this is stuffed
    > > Napa which is milder and does not stink when you are steaming it. <g>

    >
    > It does look pretty good, hafta admit. As do Steve's cabbage rolls...
    >
    > I think I might ask Dad to make some (he loves cabbage) and has talked
    > about making some 'stuffed cabbage leaves' for a while. Heck, I ate a
    > few mouthfuls of his 'special' cabbage and didn't die - altho' I can't
    > say I enjoyed it.
    >
    > Worst case scenario: I can leave the cabbage and eat the stuffing...
    > --
    > Cheers
    > Chatty (martyr) Cathy
    >
    > Google is my Friend (GIMF)


    <lol> Too darned true! Like me and stuffed bell peppers. I just cannot
    abide those things and pick the bits of them out whenever I find them!
    --
    Peace! Om

    "If you don't read the newspaper you are uninformed; if you do read the newspaper you are misinformed." --Mark Twain

  15. #15
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    ChattyCathy wrote on Sat, 13 Sep 2008 19:17:06 +0200:

    >> I should mention that I don't freeze cilantro. It's not worth
    >> the trouble since it keeps for a week at normal refrigerator
    >> temperature and I can buy a fair sized bunch for 50 or 60
    >> cents (US). What I wish I could do is reliably find it with
    >> roots, which add to several Vietnamese and Thai recipes.
    >>

    > We can get coriander (cilantro) with roots and all here at
    > several veggie places I shop at. Wish I could send you some
    > ;-) --


    Thanks for the offer! Once in a while I come across cilantro with roots
    but even those little ethnic stores cannot be guaranteed to have it.


    Here's a recipe for an excellent way to cook chicken.

    Gai Yang: pepper/ coriander root marinated chicken breast. (I know it
    says "coriander" :-)



    2 tsp black pepper corns

    5 or 6 large garlic cloves

    3 tab cilantro roots

    Pinch salt

    1 tsp Thai fish sauce



    Blend and rub onto four portions of chicken breast, marinade for at
    least an hour


    By the way, others many have missed that cilantro keeps better dry
    rather than sprayed with water as in the stores.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  16. #16
    ChattyCathy Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    Sheldon wrote:
    >
    > Why don't yoose all grow your own... cilantro and parsley are about
    > the easiest plants to grow... 1 sq ft of ground is more than enough to
    > grow all a big family can possibly use. You can grow it in pots too
    > but it does much better in the ground.


    I wish. We grow mint, basil, parsley (both curly and flat leaf) outside
    in the garden without any problems, in fact they grow like weeds -
    however never had much success with cilantro outdoors, so I tried
    growing it indoors in a pot - still no luck. I suspect it's our climate
    (too hot and dry maybe?) Any suggestions?
    --
    Cheers
    Chatty Cathy

    Google is my Friend (GIMF)

  17. #17
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    ChattyCathy wrote:

    > I wish. We grow mint, basil, parsley (both curly and flat leaf) outside
    > in the garden without any problems, in fact they grow like weeds -
    > however never had much success with cilantro outdoors, so I tried
    > growing it indoors in a pot - still no luck. I suspect it's our climate
    > (too hot and dry maybe?) Any suggestions?



    I have no problem getting cilantro to grow, but I don't get those nice
    broad leaves live the the stuff I see in the store. Mine has scrawny
    little leaves and quickly flowers. I have tried cutting it back to get
    rid of the flowers and to develop more leaves. It also tends to grow
    wild in my herb garden now.

    I had to go out and buy cilantro for my Apricot Cilantro Chutney last
    week. It is frustrating to buy a whole bunch of it and use only about
    1/4 of it for a recipe and then have all the rest go bad before I can
    use it up.


  18. #18
    Mark Thorson Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    Dave Smith wrote:
    >
    > I had to go out and buy cilantro for my Apricot Cilantro Chutney last
    > week. It is frustrating to buy a whole bunch of it and use only about
    > 1/4 of it for a recipe and then have all the rest go bad before I can
    > use it up.


    The produce store I shop at keeps the cut ends in water.
    I presume they wouldn't bother if it didn't help keep
    it fresh.

  19. #19
    john d hamilton Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating


    "Mark Thorson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    > Dave Smith wrote:
    >>
    >> I had to go out and buy cilantro for my Apricot Cilantro Chutney last
    >> week. It is frustrating to buy a whole bunch of it and use only about
    >> 1/4 of it for a recipe and then have all the rest go bad before I can
    >> use it up.

    > The produce store I shop at keeps the cut ends in water.
    > I presume they wouldn't bother if it didn't help keep
    > it fresh.


    we find putting it in a plastic bag with olive oil and then freezing it ,
    and it remains quite good for future use to cook with.



  20. #20
    Saerah Gray Guest

    Default Re: washing corriander before refridgerating

    Dave Smith <[email protected]> fnord news:48cc1471$0$7383
    $[email protected]:

    > ChattyCathy wrote:
    >
    >> I wish. We grow mint, basil, parsley (both curly and flat leaf)

    outside
    >> in the garden without any problems, in fact they grow like weeds -
    >> however never had much success with cilantro outdoors, so I tried
    >> growing it indoors in a pot - still no luck. I suspect it's our

    climate
    >> (too hot and dry maybe?) Any suggestions?

    >
    >
    > I have no problem getting cilantro to grow, but I don't get those nice
    > broad leaves live the the stuff I see in the store. Mine has scrawny
    > little leaves and quickly flowers. I have tried cutting it back to

    get
    > rid of the flowers and to develop more leaves. It also tends to grow
    > wild in my herb garden now.
    >
    > I had to go out and buy cilantro for my Apricot Cilantro Chutney last
    > week. It is frustrating to buy a whole bunch of it and use only about
    > 1/4 of it for a recipe and then have all the rest go bad before I can
    > use it up.
    >


    I've made a pesto-type thing out of it with garlic and oil. It freezes
    well.

    --
    Saerah

    "Welcome to Usenet, Biatch! Adapt or haul ass!"
    - some hillbilly from FL

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