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Thread: vinaigrette

  1. #1
    sf Guest

    Default vinaigrette


    Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to add a
    little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too acidic. I
    always add oil and have not been completely happy with the result.
    Next time, I'll try salt.



    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  2. #2
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    sf wrote on Sat, 04 Sep 2010 12:27:03 -0700:


    > Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to
    > add a little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too
    > acidic. I always add oil and have not been completely happy
    > with the result. Next time, I'll try salt.


    Have you ever tried using sushi vinegar (it is sweetened) in a
    vinaigrette. Cross cultural contamination, I know but it can be good.

    --

    James Silverton
    Potomac, Maryland

    Email, with obvious alterations: not.jim.silverton.at.verizon.not


  3. #3
    JL Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette



    sf wrote:
    > Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to add a
    > little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too acidic. I
    > always add oil and have not been completely happy with the result.
    > Next time, I'll try salt.


    Its the vinegar.

    You got to like the vinegar on its own, other wise no additions of any
    sort will really help. Though one time when i had nothing else but
    plain white vinegar i found the addition of powdered mustard to be very
    helpful.

    If i am going to use the vinaigrette as soon as i make it i will also
    add a pinch of salt.

    But i usually make it ahead for various uses and once its sat for 20
    minutes it don't need any more salt than its ingredients already bring
    to it.

    But i also put lots of stuff besides oil & vinegar into it, notably
    green onions, garlic, lemon juice, freshly ground pepper, with a walnut
    or grape seed oil and an apple cider vinegar.

    I will use peanut oil if i want to make up several cups of vinaigrette.
    But curry powder, oregano, basil, sage (whole leaf) cayenne flakes,
    anise, fennel, capers, dill, paprika, parsley all get used by me
    periodically in my vinaigrettes.

    And often as not such elaborate vinaigrettes are really marinades i end
    up using as the basis for a sauce to serve with the meat i marinated in it.

    For salads i tend to keep it simple, garlic, onion, pepper, citrus/white
    wine. But i then make double the amount i need for the salad, divide it
    in half and use one half to marinate a poached chicken breast. Cut up
    and marinate in half of the vinaigrette to which i might add any number
    of additions of herbs & spices. Let this cooked & diced breast of
    chicken marinate in the vinaigrette for at least 1/2 hour then serve
    with the salad lightly tossed with the remaining, simple vinaigrette.

    Now if i have a good balsamic vinegar and a nice avocado oil all bets
    are off and i get out the blue cheese

    --

    Mr. Joseph Paul Littleshoes Esq.

    Domine, dirige nos.

    Let the games begin!
    http://fredeeky.typepad.com/fredeeky.../sf_anthem.mp3


  4. #4
    sf Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    On Sat, 4 Sep 2010 15:34:21 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf wrote on Sat, 04 Sep 2010 12:27:03 -0700:
    >
    >
    > > Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to
    > > add a little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too
    > > acidic. I always add oil and have not been completely happy
    > > with the result. Next time, I'll try salt.

    >
    > Have you ever tried using sushi vinegar (it is sweetened) in a
    > vinaigrette. Cross cultural contamination, I know but it can be good.


    Yes, I have with better luck.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  5. #5
    Tara Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    On Sat, 4 Sep 2010 15:34:21 -0400, "James Silverton"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Have you ever tried using sushi vinegar (it is sweetened) in a
    >vinaigrette. Cross cultural contamination, I know but it can be good.


    I used rice wine vinegar as a substitute for balsamic vinegar in a
    balsamic chicken and greens recipe a few weeks ago. I was well into
    the recipe when I realized I was out of balsamic. The results were
    still tasty. Both vinegars are sweet. It didn't taste too cross
    culturally contaminated.

    Tara

  6. #6
    sf Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    On Sat, 04 Sep 2010 13:07:21 -0700, JL <j[email protected]> wrote:

    > Its the vinegar.


    Their particular vinaigrette was made with lemon juice. It was too
    acidic, they added salt and it was fine. It was one of those aha
    moments for me.

    --

    Never trust a dog to watch your food.

  7. #7
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    On Sep 4, 2:30*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    > On Sat, 04 Sep 2010 13:07:21 -0700, JL <jpsti...@isp.com> wrote:
    > > Its the vinegar.

    >
    > Their particular vinaigrette was made with lemon juice. *It was too
    > acidic, they added salt and it was fine. *It was one of those aha
    > moments for me.
    >
    > --
    >
    > Never trust a dog to watch your food.


    Lemon juice? No vinegar at all? I would have added just a touch of
    sweet - sugar, honey, agave . . .
    Lynn in Fargo
    Computer on fritz. I get here when I find a keyboard with nobody
    sitting in front of it.

  8. #8
    Lynn from Fargo Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    On Sep 4, 4:08*pm, Lynn from Fargo <lynng...@i29.net> wrote:
    > On Sep 4, 2:30*pm, sf <s...@geemail.com> wrote:
    >
    > > On Sat, 04 Sep 2010 13:07:21 -0700, JL <jpsti...@isp.com> wrote:
    > > > Its the vinegar.

    >
    > > Their particular vinaigrette was made with lemon juice. *It was too
    > > acidic, they added salt and it was fine. *It was one of those aha
    > > moments for me.

    >
    > > --

    >
    > > Never trust a dog to watch your food.

    >
    > Lemon juice? No vinegar at all? *I would have added just a touch of
    > sweet - sugar, honey, agave *. . .
    > Lynn in Fargo
    > Computer on fritz. *I get here when I find a keyboard with nobody
    > sitting in front of it.



  9. #9
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette


    "sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio

    > Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to add a>
    > little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too acidic. I> always
    > add oil and have not been completely happy with the result.
    > Next time, I'll try salt.


    I did a whole article one time on balancing acid with salt. Too many go for
    the sugar or the honey, and it isn't always a good answer.



  10. #10
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    On Sun, 5 Sep 2010 09:10:11 +0200, "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >"sf" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >
    >> Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to add a>
    >> little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too acidic. I> always
    >> add oil and have not been completely happy with the result.
    >> Next time, I'll try salt.

    >
    >I did a whole article one time on balancing acid with salt. Too many go for
    >the sugar or the honey, and it isn't always a good answer.


    A whole BULL**** article... vinegar acidity ALWAYS dilutes with plain
    water... what a kitchen fraud!

  11. #11
    Ranee at Arabian Knits Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    In article <[email protected]>,
    sf <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to add a
    > little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too acidic. I
    > always add oil and have not been completely happy with the result.
    > Next time, I'll try salt.


    That is what I usually do. I don't know if I was taught that, or if
    it was trial and error. I find lemon dressings and some vinaigrettes to
    be to sharp without the salt.

    Regards,
    Ranee @ Arabian Knits

    "She seeks wool and flax, and works with willing hands." Prov 31:13

    http://arabianknits.blogspot.com/

  12. #12
    Steve Pope Guest

    Default Re: vinaigrette

    Ranee at Arabian Knits <[email protected]> wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote:


    >> Watching Joann Weir on public broadcasting today. She said to add a
    >> little more salt (or oil) to a vinaigrette that is too acidic. I
    >> always add oil and have not been completely happy with the result.
    >> Next time, I'll try salt.


    > That is what I usually do. I don't know if I was taught that, or if
    >it was trial and error. I find lemon dressings and some vinaigrettes to
    >be to sharp without the salt.


    My mother (Italian) always just said to use 2x as much oil as
    vinegar. That works, in a sense, but it can be too oily.

    My solution to this is to use about equal proportions, but
    less overall (that is, dress the salad more lightly).

    Lemons are less predictable than vinegar as their acidity
    is not standardized. There, you do have to rely on a taste-test.


    Steve

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