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Thread: Verjus for Christine D (and Arri!)

  1. #1
    Lin Guest

    Default Verjus for Christine D (and Arri!)

    Hi Christine ... Bob and I hope you try the verjus soon!

    Many times vinegar makes things prepared with wine not taste good -- for
    instance vinegar and wine in a salad (not wine vinegar). You can use
    verjus in place of vinegar in recipes that call for it.

    Verjus is interesting to sample on it's own. Sort of sweet, a bit of
    bite. It's also non-alcoholic. We like getting ours from the Navarro
    Vineyards. The grapes they use vary each year and there's always a
    limited amount. They have one of those idyllic settings with sheep
    roaming through the vineyard and a lovely scape of rolling foothills.

    http://www.navarrowine.com/main.php

    Executive Chef Alan Kantor of MacCallum House Restaurant in Mendocino
    uses only Navarro Verjus in this recipe (Bob made this recipe last week
    -- the Beurre Blanc was pure decadence):

    http://www.maccallumhouse.com/pages/...t/recipes.html

    *Caramelized Day Boat Scallops with Verjus-Vanilla Beurre Blanc*

    Serves 6
    2# day boat scallops
    Sprinkle scallops with salt and sear in hot, almost smoking, sauté pan
    until golden brown on each side, approximately 2 minutes on each side.
    Serve with verjus-vanilla beurre blanc.

    Ingredients for Verjus-Vanilla Beurre Blanc:
    1-1/2 sticks butter, unsalted
    2 T. shallots, fine dice
    1/2 vanilla bean, split
    1/4 tsp. saffron
    1/2 c. verjus from Navarro Vineyards
    1 ounce heavy cream

    Technique:
    Melt 1 T. of the butter in a small non-reactive saucepan (Calphalon or
    stainless), add shallots, scraped seeds from vanilla bean, vanilla bean
    pod and saffron. Sweat over very low heat for 1 minute.

    Add verjus and reduce by half to approximately 1/4 cup. Cut remaining
    butter into small piecesand whisk into sauce over low flame. When butter
    is just completely melted, remove from heat immediately and strain
    through fine sieve. Whiskcream in and season with salt and white pepper
    to taste. Use immediately orhold in prewarmed thermos up to one hour ahead.

    _____________________________________________

    Stumbled on this link. There looks like a lot of great recipes that
    incorporate verjus:

    http://www.terrasonoma.com/recipes.html

    So, as you can see the verjus is quite versatile. It holds up very well,
    too. We have some sitting out in a decanter and a bottle in the fridge.
    We have six or so corked bottles left and those should last quite a
    while. A little goes a long way!

    --Lin

  2. #2
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Verjus for Christine D (and Arri!)

    Lin wrote:
    > Hi Christine ... Bob and I hope you try the verjus soon!
    >
    > Many times vinegar makes things prepared with wine not taste good -- for
    > instance vinegar and wine in a salad (not wine vinegar). You can use
    > verjus in place of vinegar in recipes that call for it.
    >
    > Verjus is interesting to sample on it's own. Sort of sweet, a bit of
    > bite. It's also non-alcoholic. We like getting ours from the Navarro
    > Vineyards. The grapes they use vary each year and there's always a
    > limited amount. They have one of those idyllic settings with sheep
    > roaming through the vineyard and a lovely scape of rolling foothills.
    >

    <snip>
    And Verjus is also the ingredient which made mustard from Dijon
    famous (they used verjus instead of vinegar about 1752).

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



  3. #3
    Lin Guest

    Default Re: Verjus for Christine D (and Arri!)

    Michael Kuettner wrote:

    > And Verjus is also the ingredient which made mustard from Dijon
    > famous (they used verjus instead of vinegar about 1752).


    I did not know that! Interesting!

    --Lin

  4. #4
    Victor Sack Guest

    Default Re: Verjus for Christine D (and Arri!)

    Michael Kuettner <[email protected]> wrote:

    > And Verjus is also the ingredient which made mustard from Dijon
    > famous (they used verjus instead of vinegar about 1752).


    I think it was more than just verjus or must. And that is how the ABB
    Mostert, which was first produced in 1726, used to be made in
    Düsseldorf. The very word "mustard" , moutarde", etc, come from "mustum
    ardens", "burning must".

    Victor

  5. #5
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Verjus for Christine D (and Arri!)


    > Michael Kuettner wrote:
    >
    > And Verjus is also the ingredient which made mustard from Dijon
    > famous (they used verjus instead of vinegar about 1752).
    >


    Spelled "verjuice"... it's the juice of unripe fruit, more often crabapples,
    and also grapes... literally means "green juice".

    ---> http://www.thegoodwebguide.co.uk/?PAGEID=010775





  6. #6
    Michael Kuettner Guest

    Default Re: Verjus for Christine D (and Arri!)

    Victor Sack wrote:
    > Michael Kuettner <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> And Verjus is also the ingredient which made mustard from Dijon
    >> famous (they used verjus instead of vinegar about 1752).

    >
    > I think it was more than just verjus or must.


    Yes, of course. But the mustard became famous after the switch.

    > And that is how the ABB
    > Mostert, which was first produced in 1726, used to be made in
    > Düsseldorf. The very word "mustard" , moutarde", etc, come from "mustum
    > ardens", "burning must".
    >

    Yes, Columella gives us a recipe for mustum ardens ca. 60 AD.

    Cheers,

    Michael Kuettner



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