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Thread: Velvety texture for cake?

  1. #1
    knjkn Guest

    Default Velvety texture for cake?


    Hello, I am trying to make a red velvet cake, but every recipe I have
    found is very airy and fluffy which seems to be a contradiction to the
    reason for the name. I have only had one RVC that was velvet in texture,
    and I cannot seem to find how to create it. What would make a cake
    dense, moist and velvet in texture? It is almost like the texture of a
    pound cake, or at least some of the cakes I have had (other pound cakes
    are airy and fluffy too, not sure why it is still called the same thing
    when it is just a normal cake?).
    If anyone can help, perhaps with pictures, I would really appreciate it.
    I am making the cake for my wedding, so it's really important I get this
    right.
    I hope that I am making sense when I say velvet texture, the cake does
    not have air pockets like normal cakes. When you cut it, you can feel
    the knife cutting it...it's very dense. Thanks again, in advance!




    --
    knjkn

  2. #2
    Goomba Guest

    Default Re: Velvety texture for cake?

    knjkn wrote:
    > Hello, I am trying to make a red velvet cake, but every recipe I have
    > found is very airy and fluffy which seems to be a contradiction to the
    > reason for the name.



    I never heard that Red Velvet Cake had any particular texture and that
    the name refers only to the color of the cake.

  3. #3
    Hell Toupee Guest

    Default Re: Velvety texture for cake?

    On 6/30/2011 4:26 AM, knjkn wrote:
    > Hello, I am trying to make a red velvet cake, but every recipe I have
    > found is very airy and fluffy which seems to be a contradiction to the
    > reason for the name. I have only had one RVC that was velvet in texture,
    > and I cannot seem to find how to create it. What would make a cake
    > dense, moist and velvet in texture? It is almost like the texture of a
    > pound cake, or at least some of the cakes I have had (other pound cakes
    > are airy and fluffy too, not sure why it is still called the same thing
    > when it is just a normal cake?).
    > If anyone can help, perhaps with pictures, I would really appreciate it.
    > I am making the cake for my wedding, so it's really important I get this
    > right.
    > I hope that I am making sense when I say velvet texture, the cake does
    > not have air pockets like normal cakes. When you cut it, you can feel
    > the knife cutting it...it's very dense. Thanks again, in advance!
    >


    http://www.thefoodmaven.com/diary/00000337.html


    The Food Maven Diary

    Red Velvet Cake

    Since Raven The Cake Man, a young African-American baker in newly
    stylish Fort Greene in Brooklyn, delivered his stupendous Red Velvet
    Cake to me and Joan Hamburg on our Saturday Weekend program, the
    subject of Red Velvet Cake keeps coming up. Well, Joan keeps bringing
    it up. And since it came up once again when Michael and Jane Stern
    were on our program last week, I thought I would share the recipe I
    have had in my files for a number of years, and the story of this
    wonderful all-American cake.

    There are three basic versions of cake by this name, although all use
    a combination of buttermilk, baking soda (sometimes baking powder,
    too) and vinegar as the leavening. (Buttermilk, an acid, when combined
    with baking soda, which is alkaline, react together and bubble up,
    forming carbon dioxide gas which pumps up -- or leavens -- the cake.
    It's a common, old-time formula that predates the invention of baking
    powder.)

    One version of the recipe, as outlined by James Beard in his book
    "American Cookery" and recorded in many other books in my collection,
    uses a half cup (1 stick) butter as shortening, which I felt turned
    out a rather dry, uninteresting cake. It is essentially a devil's food
    cake, although devil's food is most often made with at least a small
    amount of brown sugar, not all white.

    Another version that I found repeated in several sources, uses
    anywhere from 1/2 to 1 cup of solid white shortening.

    The third version, which is by far the fattiest but certainly the only
    one with a texture that you could call "velvet," is made with a
    considerable amount of vegetable oil, which, along with the soft, fine
    cake flour, and tenderizing buttermilk-soda leavening, produces a cake
    that nearly melts in your mouth.

    ....The following recipe, which I devised after consulting many
    recipes, is a slightly adjusted version of Lillian's -- with 25% less
    oil and much more cocoa. As for the amount of red food coloring, some
    recipes call for as much as two one-ounce bottles. Some recipes ask
    for only one teaspoon, which merely tints the faintly chocolate-brown
    cake so that it has a red cast.. Lillian uses one bottle, which
    produces a vivid red color. Since food coloring now costs more than $2
    an ounce, and this is otherwise an inexpensive cake to bake, I suggest
    using no more than two teaspoons of food coloring. Besides, a strong,
    artificial red color can be a turn-off these days,. Of course, you can
    add more than I specify or none at all.

    Raven The Cake Man
    708 Fulton Street (at South Oxford Street)
    Brooklyn, NY
    (718) 694-2253
    All layer cakes: 8-inch-$35, 9-inch $45

    Red Velvet Cake

    Other names for this cake are Red Devil's Food Cake, $100 (and up)
    Cake, and Waldorf Cake.

    Makes one 9-inch cake

    2 1/4 cups cake flour
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1 teaspoon salt
    1/4 cup cocoa
    1 1/2 cups sugar
    1 1/2 cups vegetable oil
    2 eggs
    2 teaspoons to 1 bottle red food coloring (1 ounce), optional (see
    header note)
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    1 teaspoon white distilled vinegar
    1 cup buttermilk (fat content not important)
    Cream cheese frosting or boiled frosting (optional)

    Prepare 2 9-inch pans by greasing lightly then flouring lightly or
    greasing them then lining the bottoms with parchment or waxed paper.
    (No need to grease the paper.)

    In a mixing bowl, combine flour, baking soda, salt, and cocoa. Set aside.

    In another mixing bowl, with a hand-held mixer on low speed, or with a
    wooden spoon, beat the sugar and oil together until well blended.

    Add eggs, one at a time, blending well between additions.

    Blend in food coloring, vanilla, and vinegar. Scrape bowl down with a
    rubber spatula.

    Alternately blend in flour and buttermilk , using about a third of
    each at a time and scraping sides of bowl a couple of times. Make sure
    not to overbeat or use the electric mixer on high -- this will toughen
    the cake.

    Immediately pour into prepared pans and bake in a preheated 350-degree
    oven for 25 to 30 minutes, until a toothpick inserted in the center
    comes out clean.

    On a wire rack, cool cakes in pans for 5 minutes. Remove cakes from
    pans and cool completely on rack.

    Fill and frost as desired, or not at all. For presentation, you want
    to sprinkle unfrosted cakes with confectioners' sugar.


    Cream Cheese Frosting

    1 8-ounce package cream cheese
    1 stick (8 tablespoons) butter
    16 ounces (1 box) confectioners' sugar
    1 teaspoon vanilla
    Milk, as needed

    In a mixing bowl, beat the cream cheese until softened and smooth.

    Add butter and continue to beat until softened, smooth and well
    incorporated with the cream cheese.

    Beat in the sugar a little at a time, then the vanilla.

    If frosting is too thick to spread easily, beat in cold milk a
    tablespoon or so at a time until of spreading consistency.

  4. #4
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Velvety texture for cake?


    "knjkn" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    > Hello, I am trying to make a red velvet cake, but every recipe I have
    > found is very airy and fluffy which seems to be a contradiction to the
    > reason for the name. I


    You may be mistaken about the reason for the name, but anyway, if you liken
    it to poundcake, then you are talking about a cake with a very high
    proportion of eggs and butter. It then has a rich density, it's weighty,
    and not at all light and fluffy.
    Red velvet cake gets red from food coloring, so find a rich, velvety cake
    you do like and color it red! That's what the first person to make it did.



  5. #5
    Kody Guest

    Default Re: Velvety texture for cake?


    "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >
    > "knjkn" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >> Hello, I am trying to make a red velvet cake, but every recipe I have
    >> found is very airy and fluffy which seems to be a contradiction to the
    >> reason for the name. I

    >
    > You may be mistaken about the reason for the name, but anyway, if you
    > liken it to poundcake, then you are talking about a cake with a very high
    > proportion of eggs and butter. It then has a rich density, it's weighty,
    > and not at all light and fluffy.
    > Red velvet cake gets red from food coloring, so find a rich, velvety cake
    > you do like and color it red! That's what the first person to make it
    > did.

    Didn't it originally get it's red color from a crushed up beetle bug?



  6. #6
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Velvety texture for cake?

    On Thu, 30 Jun 2011 12:03:11 -0400, Goomba <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >knjkn wrote:
    >> Hello, I am trying to make a red velvet cake, but every recipe I have
    >> found is very airy and fluffy which seems to be a contradiction to the
    >> reason for the name.

    >
    >
    >I never heard that Red Velvet Cake had any particular texture and that
    >the name refers only to the color of the cake.


    Red refers to it's color, velvet refers to its heavy textured
    richness... if it's just a red colored cake but light/airy its not red
    *velvet* cake. The heavy velvet like richness comes from the
    inclusion of Barb's beets.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_velvet_cake


  7. #7
    Giusi Guest

    Default Re: Velvety texture for cake?


    "Kody" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio>
    > "Giusi" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    >>> Hello, I am trying to make a red velvet cake, but every recipe I have
    >>> found is very airy and fluffy which seems to be a contradiction to the
    >>> reason for the name. I

    >>
    >> You may be mistaken about the reason for the name, but anyway, if you
    >> liken it to poundcake, then you are talking about a cake with a very high
    >> proportion of eggs and butter. It then has a rich density, it's weighty,
    >> and not at all light and fluffy.
    >> Red velvet cake gets red from food coloring, so find a rich, velvety cake
    >> you do like and color it red! That's what the first person to make it
    >> did.

    > Didn't it originally get it's red color from a crushed up beetle bug?


    No, that's alkermes. I have some and the red isn't that strong.



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