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Thread: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

  1. #1
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

    Lately - the last few years - I almost never see Valencia
    oranges in the stores. It used to be that you would see
    them every year at a certain time of year. And when they
    were on sale for maybe a 4-5 lb. bag for $2.50-$3.00 I would
    buy as many bags as I could and then make juice and guzzle
    the stuff while it lasted. That was maybe once or twice a
    year.

    So, it's been a long time since I've seen them but this week
    one store in the area had them on "sale" - 4 lb. bag for $4.99.
    Well 3 or 4 years ago I wouldn't have considered that a sale
    price but these days I thought it wasn't too bad and given that
    you just can't find them anymore I was willing to go the
    5 bucks a bag and bought 2 bags, which I will squeeze and drink
    this weekend.

    So last night I stopped at TJ's after work and low and behold
    they had 4-lb. bags of Valencia's for $3.29! Damn!!!!
    So I bought 2 more bags - one can never have too many Valencias.
    Thank goodness I just got paid - if it had been the end of the
    month I would have had to think twice. Funny thing is they also
    had organic Valencias for only $4.29 - less than the ones I bought
    at the supermarket!

    I also got a 3-lb. box of some of the most beautiful dark
    cherries I've seen in a while. I will be stuffing my face
    with them this weekend, which starts tomorrow (off for 4 July),
    as well as guzzling as much oj as I can. I don't even want
    to think about the possible aftermath of all that. ;-)

    I also got some of their fresh lobster ravioli which I plan
    to have for dinner tonight to start the weekend off with a
    bang. Got some of their arrabiata sauce to put on it.
    Can't wait to try it.

    And Tuesday night I got some Jardine's Pomegranate Salsa
    at a local gourment grocery. Will have some of that with
    TJs new unsalted organic white corn tortilla chips. They're
    really good.

    Can't wait until 5 o'clock to get out of here and head home
    to all these awesome goodies.

    Hope y'all have a great holiday weekend. I know I will.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  2. #2
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranate salsa!

    On Thu, 02 Jul 2009 12:37:44 -0400, Kate Connally <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Lately - the last few years - I almost never see Valencia
    >oranges in the stores.


    Now that you made me think about it, you're right! It used to be very
    easy to find Valencia oranges. I guess all those trees that died
    after various freezes were replanted with navels.

    --
    I love cooking with wine.
    Sometimes I even put it in the food.

  3. #3
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranate salsa!

    In article <h2inoq$s94$[email protected]>,
    Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:

    > And Tuesday night I got some Jardine's Pomegranate Salsa
    > at a local gourment grocery.


    What in the name of all this holy is pomegranate salsa? I'm not seeing
    it, Kate. What in Alex' name is in it? Oy!
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - good news 4-6-2009
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle."
    -Philo of Alexandria

  4. #4
    brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranate salsa!


    "Melba's Jammin' wrote
    > Kate Connally wrote:
    >
    >> And Tuesday night I got some Jardine's Pomegranate Salsa
    >> at a local gourment grocery.

    >
    > What in the name of all this holy is pomegranate salsa? I'm not seeing
    > it, Kate. What in Alex' name is in it? Oy!
    >
    >

    Pomegranite juice with diced onions and Beta vulgaris., a pinch of black
    pepper and a smidge of honey. Yummy in your tummy!






  5. #5
    marika Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranate salsa!


    "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..

    ..
    >
    > What in the name of all this holy is pomegranate salsa? I'm not seeing
    > it, Kate. What in Alex' name is in it? Oy!
    > --



    Our supermarket has all sorts of fruit salsa. It's just salsa with that
    particular ingredient added. I buoght the peach one last week. Not for me.
    Too sweet.

    speaking of eccentricity in cooking, nice article

    Date: Sep 13, 2007 9:57 PM
    http://www.philly.com/inquirer/food/...t_on_cake.html

    Southerners are sweet on cake
    By Charles Perry
    Los Angeles Times


    Caramel glaze spills down a brown-sugar pound cake, one of 64
    hard-to-resist recipes in "Southern Cakes." Most are easy but sinfully rich.
    In a climate like the American South's, you'd think people would want
    light, refreshing desserts - sorbets, maybe. Actually, Southerners are
    crazy for cake.

    They make fruitcakes, angel cakes, chocolate cakes, pound cakes, layer
    cakes of all kinds (they can't get enough of coconut cakes). They have
    varieties you may never have heard of, such as Lane cake (a white cake
    with fluffy white frosting and a custardy coconut, raisin and nut
    filling), and they keep inventing more.

    Some are homey treats based on molasses or dried fruit, but the majority
    are madly rich. Most of the 64 recipes in Nancie McDermott's
    just-published Southern Cakes call for reckless quantities of cream,
    butter, sugar and eggs.

    The resulting cakes tower grandly, they're plushly frosted, they ooze
    filling. Just try to resist them. It will be a lesson in humility.

    McDermott, who lived in Irvine and Carlsbad, Calif., from 1985 to 1999,
    learned about Thai food while serving in the Peace Corps and is best
    known for her half dozen books on Southeast Asian cooking. Then she
    surprised Southern California's foodies by moving back to her home state
    of North Carolina.

    The Asian cookbooks kept coming, but now here's Southern Cakes, showing
    that the persimmon doesn't fall far from the tree. On returning to the
    South, she writes, she has enjoyed taking "a long, sweet look at
    Southern food in general and Southern baking in particular."

    For a generation, people have been amazingly impressed when anybody
    makes a cake from scratch. In fact, as I found when cooking my way
    through eight recipes in this book, it's absurdly easy. Your mixer
    creams the butter and sugar with no effort from you, then you mix in the
    eggs, liquid and flour, and bingo: batter. The baking part is no more
    difficult than with a mix.

    True, frostings can be more troublesome, and I tend to trust a candy
    thermometer when higher densities of sugar syrup are involved, rather
    than relying on the traditional method of evaluating thread or soft-ball
    stages. My main criticism of McDermott's book is that I wish she had put
    in temperatures more often for the frostings. Otherwise, these recipes
    are very well worked out, written clearly enough for a novice to handle.

    There is a specific Southern repertoire of cakes, such as the fabled
    Lady Baltimore (a white cake with seven-minute frosting and fruits and
    nuts in the filling). Still, a lot of Southern cakes are local
    variations on ideas familiar elsewhere. Everybody makes devil's food
    cake, right? Ah, but not necessarily with a whipped-cream filling, as in
    Celestial chocolate cake.

    The thing Southern cake-makers are perhaps best known for is a goofy
    fondness for strange ingredients. They may put in mayonnaise (well, it's
    basically egg yolks, oil and lemon juice, so why not?) or even tomato
    soup. "Southern cooks don't keep the key ingredient a mystery,"
    McDermott writes. "We find quirkiness attractive, and tomato soup cake
    is pretty, easy and simply delicious."

    The "everyday" cakes include Ocracoke Island fig cake (a spice cake from
    North Carolina's Outer Banks, made with figs and walnuts and topped with
    a buttermilk glaze) and a blueberry cake (pretty much blueberry muffins
    baked in a cake pan) from the Shenandoah Valley of Virginia. Along with
    these homey items, McDermott presents a couple of wild ones. Japanese
    fruitcake is not Japanese in the slightest - it's four alternating
    layers of fruited and plain cake with a filling of lemon coconut glaze.
    This is one case in which McDermott's research has turned up no
    explanation for the name. (I suspect people thought it looked like a
    pagoda.)

    For my money, the grandest-looking cakes in this book are the
    brown-sugar pound cake baked in a tube pan with a lush mass of caramel
    glaze drooling down its sides, and the classic coconut cake, with its
    feathery, dazzling white frosting. When I brought the coconut cake to
    the office, people in the street were literally lunging at it.

    That's the thing about this book. I've always been a pie-oriented guy,
    insofar as I've bothered with dessert at all. McDermott has made a
    convert of me. She's shown me that if you want to impress people all to
    heck, nothing beats a great big cake loaded with frosting.

    Call me crazy. But first, have just one slice. . . .




  6. #6
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

    On Jul 2, 11:37*am, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.edu> wrote:
    (snip)
    > I also got a 3-lb. box of some of the most beautiful dark
    > cherries I've seen in a while. *I will be stuffing my face
    > with them this weekend
    > Kate
    >

    Where were those cherries from? California cherries can be really
    good, and cherries from Washington state are wonderful; but cherries
    from the Flathead Valley close to Missoula were incredible. Huge,
    almost black and so crisp they'd squirt cherry juice over many a white
    shirt. There was a terrible freeze on the valley more than twenty
    years ago that killed virtually all of the cherry trees. I keep
    waiting and hoping the cherries come back. I'll just eat 'em
    naked ;-)
    Lynn in Fargo


  7. #7
    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

    On Jul 3, 12:26*pm, Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig <lynng...@i29.net>
    wrote:
    > On Jul 2, 11:37*am, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.edu> wrote:
    > (snip)> I also got a 3-lb. box of some of the most beautiful dark
    > > cherries I've seen in a while. *I will be stuffing my face
    > > with them this weekend
    > > Kate

    >
    > Where were those cherries from? *California cherries can be really
    > good, and cherries from Washington state are wonderful; *but cherries
    > from the Flathead Valley close to Missoula were incredible. *Huge,
    > almost black and so crisp they'd squirt cherry juice over many a white
    > shirt. *There was a terrible freeze on the valley more than twenty
    > years ago that killed virtually all of the cherry trees. *I keep
    > waiting and hoping the cherries come back. *I'll just eat 'em
    > naked *;-)
    > Lynn in Fargo


    Oops! Missoula, Montana
    L f F

  8. #8
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranate salsa!

    In article <[email protected]> ,
    "marika" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > What in the name of all this holy is pomegranate salsa? I'm not seeing
    > > it, Kate. What in Alex' name is in it? Oy!
    > > --

    >
    >
    > Our supermarket has all sorts of fruit salsa. It's just salsa with that
    > particular ingredient added. I buoght the peach one last week. Not for me.
    > Too sweet.


    (Inappropriate distribution to another group snipped)

    I understand about fruit salsas. I think they're dumb, but I understand
    them. I'm having trouble seeing pomegranate salsa all those
    encased seeds, donchaknow.

    -Barb

  9. #9
    Melba's Jammin' Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranate salsa!

    In article <UOp3m.599$[email protected]>,
    "brooklyn1" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > "Melba's Jammin' wrote
    > > Kate Connally wrote:
    > >
    > >> And Tuesday night I got some Jardine's Pomegranate Salsa
    > >> at a local gourment grocery.

    > >
    > > What in the name of all this holy is pomegranate salsa? I'm not seeing
    > > it, Kate. What in Alex' name is in it? Oy!
    > >
    > >

    > Pomegranite juice with diced onions and Beta vulgaris., a pinch of black
    > pepper and a smidge of honey. Yummy in your tummy!


    Yuk, yuk, YUK!!! You prevert!!
    --
    -Barb, Mother Superior, HOSSSPoJ
    http://web.me.com/barbschaller - good news 4-6-2009
    "Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a great battle."
    -Philo of Alexandria

  10. #10
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <h2inoq$s94$[email protected]>,
    > Kate Connally <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> And Tuesday night I got some Jardine's Pomegranate Salsa
    >> at a local gourment grocery.

    >
    > What in the name of all this holy is pomegranate salsa? I'm not seeing
    > it, Kate. What in Alex' name is in it? Oy!


    Well, it's, um, salsa, um, with pomegranate juice
    or seeds in it.

    The one I bought was D. L. Jardine's Pomegranate Salsa.
    It's quite good, although I can't really taste the pomegranate
    very much. It's like your basic tomato salsa but with
    pomegranate juice added. It has a nice little heat to it.
    Enough to make it interesting but not do a tonsillectomy by
    capsaicin.

    After getting this stuff I went on line and found a bunch
    of pomegranate salsa recipes. They all use whole pomegranate
    seeds and some also use some juice and they have other fruits
    in them and sometimes tomatoes and lime juice and chiles and
    other stuff. I copied a whole bunch of them. The sound
    delicious and look beautiful in the pictures.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  11. #11
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

    Melba's Jammin' wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]> ,
    > "marika" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> "Melba's Jammin'" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >>> What in the name of all this holy is pomegranate salsa? I'm not seeing
    >>> it, Kate. What in Alex' name is in it? Oy!
    >>> --

    >>
    >> Our supermarket has all sorts of fruit salsa. It's just salsa with that
    >> particular ingredient added. I buoght the peach one last week. Not for me.
    >> Too sweet.

    >
    > (Inappropriate distribution to another group snipped)
    >
    > I understand about fruit salsas. I think they're dumb, but I understand
    > them. I'm having trouble seeing pomegranate salsa all those
    > encased seeds, donchaknow.
    >
    > -Barb


    This one doesn't have the whole seeds, just juice.

    I love fruit salsas. I make a mean pineapple mango
    salsa that is to die for.

    Kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  12. #12
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote:
    > On Jul 2, 11:37 am, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.edu> wrote:
    > (snip)
    >> I also got a 3-lb. box of some of the most beautiful dark
    >> cherries I've seen in a while. I will be stuffing my face
    >> with them this weekend
    >> Kate
    >>

    > Where were those cherries from? California cherries can be really
    > good, and cherries from Washington state are wonderful; but cherries
    > from the Flathead Valley close to Missoula were incredible. Huge,
    > almost black and so crisp they'd squirt cherry juice over many a white
    > shirt. There was a terrible freeze on the valley more than twenty
    > years ago that killed virtually all of the cherry trees. I keep
    > waiting and hoping the cherries come back. I'll just eat 'em
    > naked ;-)
    > Lynn in Fargo
    >


    These were from Washington state. They were pretty good,
    but even though almost every cherry was deep dark black
    only about 1 in 5 was as sweet as I expected. The others
    were a little tarter than really ripe cherries should be.
    But I still enjoyed them. I ate about half the box and
    then pitted and froze the balance. I'll make something
    with them later.

    kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

  13. #13
    Kate Connally Guest

    Default Re: Valencia oranges! Bing cherries! lobster ravioli! pomegranatesalsa!

    Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig wrote:
    > On Jul 3, 12:26 pm, Lynn from Fargo Ografmorffig <lynng...@i29.net>
    > wrote:
    >> On Jul 2, 11:37 am, Kate Connally <conna...@pitt.edu> wrote:
    >> (snip)> I also got a 3-lb. box of some of the most beautiful dark
    >>> cherries I've seen in a while. I will be stuffing my face
    >>> with them this weekend
    >>> Kate

    >> Where were those cherries from? California cherries can be really
    >> good, and cherries from Washington state are wonderful; but cherries
    >> from the Flathead Valley close to Missoula were incredible. Huge,
    >> almost black and so crisp they'd squirt cherry juice over many a white
    >> shirt. There was a terrible freeze on the valley more than twenty
    >> years ago that killed virtually all of the cherry trees. I keep
    >> waiting and hoping the cherries come back. I'll just eat 'em
    >> naked ;-)
    >> Lynn in Fargo

    >
    > Oops! Missoula, Montana
    > L f F


    Lynn, That's where I'm going on my trip. My sister lives
    in Hamilton, Montana. She talks about the great cherries they
    get there. But maybe there's not enough for "export" only for
    the "natives".

    kate

    --
    Kate Connally
    If I were as old as I feel, Id be dead already.
    Goldfish: The wholesome snack that smiles back,
    Until you bite their heads off.
    What if the hokey pokey really *is* what it's all about?
    mailto:[email protected]

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