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Thread: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

  1. #1
    janice Guest

    Default Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.

    What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?

    Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?





    --
    crossposted to English and food groups

  2. #2
    S Viemeister Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/10/2012 6:50 PM, janice wrote:
    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    > so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?
    >

    I've watched cooking shows in both the UK and US, and have only noticed
    "blitz" on the UK shows.


  3. #3
    Jack Campin Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    > the term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    > is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing
    > word?


    Since Britain got much more thoroughly blitzed than the US and has
    retained the folk memory of its blitzification with a lot of
    circumstantial detail, I'd expect it to be an indigenous British
    usage.

    "Blitz" in BrE more often means "clean thoroughly".

    I think "nuke" (in the microwave) is American, though.

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
    Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
    mobile 07800 739 557 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin

  4. #4
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "janice" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    >I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    > it
    > so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?


    I'm in the US and I've never heard it.



  5. #5
    Dr Nick Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Jack Campin <[email protected]> writes:

    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers
    >> use the term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period
    >> of time.
    >>
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of
    >> "blitz"?
    >>
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but
    >> why is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good
    >> existing word?

    >
    > Since Britain got much more thoroughly blitzed than the US and has
    > retained the folk memory of its blitzification with a lot of
    > circumstantial detail, I'd expect it to be an indigenous British
    > usage.


    Well quite. Why on earth should "blitz" be from American?
    >
    > "Blitz" in BrE more often means "clean thoroughly".


    It does "let's blitz the house this weekend", but it can mean to make a
    sudden approach (dare I say "lightening attack") on anything. "I'm
    going to blitz the paperwork today".

    > I think "nuke" (in the microwave) is American, though.


    How about "zap"?

  6. #6
    Dave Bugg Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    janice wrote:

    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English..snip


    I kinda doubt it. I've not heard that term used here.

    --
    A democracy is two wolves and a small lamb voting on what to have for
    dinner. Freedom under a constitutional republic is a well armed lamb
    contesting the vote. --- Anon



  7. #7
    gloria p Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/10/2012 4:50 PM, janice wrote:
    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    > so widespread when all it does is replace a perfectly good existing word?
    >


    I used to think it was strange when I would read or hear "whirr" or
    "whirl" to describe using a blender or food processor.

    gloria p


  8. #8
    John John Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:50:58 +0100, janice <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    >term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    >What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?


    Blender, not Mr Buzzy?

  9. #9
    tony cooper Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 00:05:31 +0100, Jack Campin
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >> the term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >>
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >>
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    >> is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing
    >> word?

    >
    >Since Britain got much more thoroughly blitzed than the US and has
    >retained the folk memory of its blitzification with a lot of
    >circumstantial detail, I'd expect it to be an indigenous British
    >usage.
    >
    >"Blitz" in BrE more often means "clean thoroughly".


    Quite a few Americans, and this one included, have a container of
    Blitz polish in the closet. Blitz is best-known for a jewelry
    cleaning polish and treated jewelry polishing cloths.

    The company was founded in 1912 and the products were developed then.
    The company's history page does not say if the original name of the
    company or the product was "Blitz", though.

    I associate "blitz" with WWII, but have no idea when the word was
    coined.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida

  10. #10
    spamtrap1888 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 10, 3:50*pm, janice <inva...@nospam.com> wrote:
    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    > so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?
    >


    "Blend" implies thoroughness. "Blitz" means lightning-fast.

  11. #11
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 17:46:06 -0600, gloria p <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >On 10/10/2012 4:50 PM, janice wrote:
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >>
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >>
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    >> so widespread when all it does is replace a perfectly good existing word?
    >>

    >
    >I used to think it was strange when I would read or hear "whirr" or
    >"whirl" to describe using a blender or food processor.


    Don't remember hearing whirr used for a blender, try whiz. Whirr does
    not stem from whirl, albiet it's used to describe the soond of soming
    whirling. Whirr is an onomatopoeia, a word that mimics a sound, in
    this case usually the sound an insect makes. Whiz is the American
    spelling, the UK spelling is whizz.

    Blitz is actually the Brtish shortening of the German blitzkrieg...
    first known use 1939... nothing American about blitz. Cooks make up
    all kinds of terminology, professional cooks are typically not very
    educated... kitchen work requires no formal education, which is why so
    many uneducated illegals in the US gravitate towards kitchen work. One
    needn't be literate to cook well.

  12. #12
    Dave Smith Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/10/2012 9:51 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >
    >
    > Blitz is actually the Brtish shortening of the German blitzkrieg...
    > first known use 1939... nothing American about blitz.


    Blitz is German for lightning.
    Blitzkrieg means lightning war.


    Cooks make up
    > all kinds of terminology, professional cooks are typically not very
    > educated... kitchen work requires no formal education, which is why so
    > many uneducated illegals in the US gravitate towards kitchen work. One
    > needn't be literate to cook well.


    Some of the uneducated become navy cooks.




  13. #13
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 21:58:55 -0400, Dave Smith
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 10/10/2012 9:51 PM, Brooklyn1 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> Blitz is actually the Brtish shortening of the German blitzkrieg...
    >> first known use 1939... nothing American about blitz.

    >
    >Blitz is German for lightning.
    >Blitzkrieg means lightning war.
    >
    >
    > Cooks make up
    >> all kinds of terminology, professional cooks are typically not very
    >> educated... kitchen work requires no formal education, which is why so
    >> many uneducated illegals in the US gravitate towards kitchen work. One
    >> needn't be literate to cook well.

    >
    >Some of the uneducated become navy cooks.


    Most, but not all.

  14. #14
    Nasti J Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 10, 4:41*pm, Dr Nick <nospa...@temporary-address.org.uk> wrote:
    ..
    >
    > It does "let's blitz the house this weekend", but it can mean to make a
    > sudden approach (dare I say "lightening attack")


    Only if you're attacking with bleach


  15. #15
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k54vqo$as5$[email protected]..
    >
    > "janice" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >>I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >>the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >>
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >>
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    >> it
    >> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >
    > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.


    Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth
    to clean brass fittings and to look good. Probably even
    Army people have done so. A Blitz Cloth is something
    that anyone in the American Military (save possibly a Navy
    cook or so...) has had intimate and finger-darkening
    experience with. It is part of our culture.
    http://www.blitzinc.com/catalog/cleaning-cloths-kits
    " The Original Blitz Cloth was developed in 1912 for the
    polishing of brass in United States Military "
    .... Read and revel in our history.

    pavane





  16. #16
    Nasti J Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Oct 10, 7:33*pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >


    > > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.

    >
    > Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth



    A) I'm pretty sure she's heard the word blitz, just not used as
    decribed un the original post.
    B) You don't whether she even HAS a husband, and even if she does, the
    odds of him having been a Marine aree really low.

  17. #17
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/10/2012 10:37 PM, pavane wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:k54vqo$as5$[email protected]..
    >>
    >> "janice" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >> news:[email protected]..
    >>> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >>> the
    >>> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >>>
    >>> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >>>
    >>> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    >>> it
    >>> so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?

    >>
    >> I'm in the US and I've never heard it.

    >
    > Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth
    > to clean brass fittings and to look good. Probably even
    > Army people have done so. A Blitz Cloth is something
    > that anyone in the American Military (save possibly a Navy
    > cook or so...) has had intimate and finger-darkening
    > experience with. It is part of our culture.
    > http://www.blitzinc.com/catalog/cleaning-cloths-kits
    > " The Original Blitz Cloth was developed in 1912 for the
    > polishing of brass in United States Military "
    > ... Read and revel in our history.


    I never heard the term blitz used to mean pulse in the blender.

    However, am I mistaken or is blitz not a German word for lightning?

    nancy

  18. #18
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "gloria p" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:k551c2$i35$[email protected]..
    > On 10/10/2012 4:50 PM, janice wrote:
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use
    >> the
    >> term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >>
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >>
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is
    >> it
    >> so widespread when all it does is replace a perfectly good existing word?
    >>

    >
    > I used to think it was strange when I would read or hear "whirr" or
    > "whirl" to describe using a blender or food processor.


    I've only heard "whiz".



  19. #19
    Julie Bove Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "Nasti J" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Oct 10, 7:33 pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >


    > > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.

    >
    > Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth



    A) I'm pretty sure she's heard the word blitz, just not used as
    decribed un the original post.
    B) You don't whether she even HAS a husband, and even if she does, the
    odds of him having been a Marine aree really low.

    Of course I have heard the word. Just not used like that. Where I used to
    work we would say "Blitz the stockroom:" and that meant we all met back
    there at a certain time and got things cleaned up and put away as quickly as
    we could. And then of course there is the Ballroom Blitz.

    I do have a husband and he was in the Coast Guard. Whether or ever used
    that cloth, I do not know.



  20. #20
    pavane Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.


    "Nasti J" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]..
    On Oct 10, 7:33 pm, "pavane" <pav...@leisure.org> wrote:
    > "Julie Bove" <julieb...@frontier.com> wrote in message
    >


    > > I'm in the US and I've never heard it.

    >
    > Ask your husband. Every US Marine has used Blitz Cloth



    A) I'm pretty sure she's heard the word blitz, just not used as
    decribed un the original post.
    B) You don't whether she even HAS a husband, and even if she does, the
    odds of him having been a Marine aree really low.

    ..................

    Yes I do. Where have you been these last years?
    He was in the Army, recently retired. Now shut up.



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