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Thread: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

  1. #101
    Bill McCray Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:
    > Daniel James filted:
    >>
    >> In article<[email protected]>, Jack
    >> Campin wrote:
    >>> I think "nuke" (in the microwave) is American, though.

    >>
    >> "Nuke" is far from unknown here in the UK, but my own preference is for
    >> "radar".
    >>
    >> RADAR (in the Direction And Rangefinding sense) being another
    >> application of microwave technology (yeah, the "RA..." bit is supposed
    >> to stand for "RAdio", but microwaves are really just very high
    >> frequency radio waves).
    >>
    >> "This coffee's gone cold ... I'll stick it in the radar ..."

    >
    > Recall that the first widely-known model of microwave oven for home use was the
    > "Amana Radarange" (inspiring a visual gag in the movie "Airplane!")...
    >
    > Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite" ("just drove
    > past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in his back yard!")?...r


    "Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that our
    Legislature want to make it our state flower.

    Bill in Kentucky

  2. #102
    Robert Bannister Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 13/10/12 11:08 PM, Peter Duncanson (BrE) wrote:
    > http://www.raf.mod.uk/history/backgr...fbritain.cfmOn
    > Sat, 13 Oct 2012 14:34:02 +0100, Daniel James <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> In article <[email protected]>, Peter Duncanson
    >> (BrE) wrote:
    >>> The difference was that the Battle of Britain involved attacks on only
    >>> military targets in Britain whereas the Blitz involved attacks on
    >>> civilian as well as military targets in Britain.

    >>
    >> I largely agree with what you've written, Peter, and I think that you
    >> have correctly stated how those terms are used by those who wish to
    >> attach precise meanings to popular names for phases of the War ... but I
    >> think that in the minds of many the word "Blitz" is associated with all
    >> German bombing of ground targets (mainly civilian, but also military
    >> ones by extension) while "Battle of Britain" is associated with aerial
    >> combat over Britain at all/any stage of the War.
    >>
    >> That is: "Blitz" describes German aggression and is a Bad Thing, while
    >> "Battle of Britain" describes our plucky lads giving Johnny Foreigner a
    >> bloody nose and so is a Good Thing. The distinction between Good Thing
    >> and Bad Thing in people's minds has a marvellous ability to make labels
    >> stick!
    >>
    >> One might also argue that "the Battle of Britain", as Churchill intended
    >> those words to be understood in his "This was their Finest Hour" speech,
    >> encompassed all the home front war effort between the evacuation of
    >> Dunkirk and the date when Operation Sealion was postponed indefinitely
    >> in late 1940 ... or maybe even until the Normandy landings in 1944.
    >>

    > This brief RAF history of the Battle of Britain lists four phases, one
    > of which is the Blitz. From their point of view the BofB was the defence
    > of Britain from attack by enemy aircraft[1] and thereby making a
    > sea-borne invasion unfeasible:
    > http://www.raf.mod.uk/history/backgr...eofbritain.cfm
    >
    > Phase 1 - The Battle Begins
    >
    > ....
    > Starting on 10 July 1940, the Luftwaffe attacked shipping convoys in
    > the Channel and Channel Ports.
    > ....
    > In this stage of the battle, the Luftwaffe was in effect probing the
    > British defences - looking for weaknesses before a major assault
    > could be launched to exploit them.
    >
    > Phase 2-Pressure grows
    >
    > At the beginning of August, with German invasion forces and troop
    > barges being assembled on the French coast, the raids against the
    > South coast of England were increased in size and number.
    >
    > Believing that the British early warning system had been destroyed
    > and the coastal towns sufficiently 'softened up' for an invasion,
    > the Luftwaffe began the next stage of their plan.
    >
    > On 13 August (called Adlertag or Eagle Day by the German High
    > Command), massive raids began on the airfields of 11 Group. The aim
    > was to destroy the RAF, either in the air or on the ground, in South
    > East England. To put pressure on the British defences, the Germans
    > sent high and low level raids to different targets at the same time.
    > ....
    > However, just when it seemed that the country and 11 Group in
    > particular couldn't continue for another day, the Germans changed
    > their tactics.
    >
    > Phase 3 - The Blitz
    >
    > ....
    > By attacking cities and industry, the Germans hoped to break British
    > morale and to destroy the factories that built fighter aircraft.
    > They also hoped that RAF fighters would gather in force round the
    > cities to protect them, which would make it easier for the Luftwaffe
    > to shoot them down in the numbers required to establish air
    > superiority.
    >
    > The change of plan was a mistake for a number of reasons. It gave 11
    > Group a chance to repair their airfields and radar sites, so the
    > defences became fully operational again. The German Me 109 fighter
    > could only carry enough fuel for 20 minutes flight over Britain, so
    > London was on the edge of its limited range.
    > ....
    > For the people living in the cities, the Blitz had begun, as night
    > raids followed daytime raids and gave the civilians little rest.
    > Everybody was in the front line, and there was little the RAF could
    > do to stop the night raids. Airborne radar was in its infancy, but
    > there were some successes for the Blenheim, Defiant and early
    > Beaufighter night-fighter Squadrons. Some of the Hurricane and
    > Spitfire day-fighter Squadrons also took part in the night defences,
    > but relied largely on luck to make an interception.
    >
    > Phase 4 - The End of the Battle
    >
    > As the long, hot summer ran into October, the German daylight bomber
    > losses became too heavy. Their bomber force started to operate only
    > at night, and the damage they caused to Britain's cities was
    > enormous. Many civilian organisations were set up to help deal with
    > the wounded people and damaged buildings.
    >
    > The German raids continued, but the RAF had started to develop night
    > fighters equipped with radar which could tackle the problem.
    > ....
    > The Germans then realised that the RAF could not be defeated in
    > 1940. Germany was also preparing to attack Russia, so Operation
    > Sea-Lion [the invasion of Britain] was cancelled indefinitely and
    > eventually abandoned altogether. The Battle of Britain was over.
    > Strangely, for such a ground breaking Battle, the first to be
    > decided purely in the air and the first real test of air power as a
    > defensive and offensive weapon, it did not really end, so much as
    > petered out.


    I have always understood that the major reason it came to an end was the
    withdrawal of resources for the Russian front. My memory tells me
    Goering was pretty annoyed about it.


    --
    Robert Bannister

  3. #103
    Robert Bannister Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 13/10/12 8:47 AM, Pico Rico wrote:
    > "Robert Bannister" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]..
    >> On 12/10/12 9:21 PM, Nancy Young wrote:
    >>> On 10/12/2012 7:58 AM, Steve Hayes wrote:
    >>>> On Thu, 11 Oct 2012 11:19:28 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Christian
    >>>> Weisgerber) wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Nancy Young <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>> I never heard the term blitz used to mean pulse in the blender.
    >>>>>> However, am I mistaken or is blitz not a German word for lightning?
    >>>>>
    >>>>> Yes, it's German for "flash, lightning bolt".
    >>>>> English uses appear all derived from "Blitzkrieg".
    >>>>
    >>>> So could its use when applied to a blender imply that one applies the
    >>>> blender
    >>>> quickly and then withdraws it, rather like a lightning flash -- a
    >>>> quick in and
    >>>> out, rather than a continuous stirring up?
    >>>
    >>> That's why I thought it was a descriptive use of the word. I never
    >>> heard anyone say Blitz it in the blender, but I understood right
    >>> away what it meant.

    >>
    >> All the same, context provides the main clue. If someone had said "Zhuzh
    >> it up in the blender" or even "Splork it", I suspect most of us would have
    >> understood.
    >>
    >>
    >> --
    >> Robert Bannister

    >
    > I think maybe the new, chic term should be to "Bannister it". Good as
    > anything else, eh?
    >
    >

    Too much of a mouthful. When it comes to signing papers, I start hating
    the name an wish I had been born an "Ng" or "O".

    --
    Robert Bannister

  4. #104
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/12/2012 8:35 PM, Robert Bannister wrote:
    > On 12/10/12 9:21 PM, Nancy Young wrote:


    >> That's why I thought it was a descriptive use of the word. I never
    >> heard anyone say Blitz it in the blender, but I understood right
    >> away what it meant.

    >
    > All the same, context provides the main clue. If someone had said "Zhuzh
    > it up in the blender" or even "Splork it", I suspect most of us would
    > have understood.


    I don't know, zhuzh sounds like a much lower speed than blitz,
    and splork, maybe I'd think it meant to pulse it.

    nancy

  5. #105
    Peter Duncanson (BrE) Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:
    >> Daniel James filted:
    >>>
    >>> In article<[email protected]>, Jack
    >>> Campin wrote:
    >>>> I think "nuke" (in the microwave) is American, though.
    >>>
    >>> "Nuke" is far from unknown here in the UK, but my own preference is for
    >>> "radar".
    >>>
    >>> RADAR (in the Direction And Rangefinding sense) being another
    >>> application of microwave technology (yeah, the "RA..." bit is supposed
    >>> to stand for "RAdio", but microwaves are really just very high
    >>> frequency radio waves).
    >>>
    >>> "This coffee's gone cold ... I'll stick it in the radar ..."

    >>
    >> Recall that the first widely-known model of microwave oven for home use was the
    >> "Amana Radarange" (inspiring a visual gag in the movie "Airplane!")...
    >>
    >> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite" ("just drove
    >> past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in his back yard!")?...r

    >
    >"Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that our
    >Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >

    <chuckle>

    In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on the
    ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.


    --
    Peter Duncanson, UK
    (in alt.english.usage)

  6. #106
    Jared Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/14/2012 6:39 AM, Peter Duncanson (BrE) wrote:
    > On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:
    >>> Daniel James filted:
    >>>>
    >>>> In article<[email protected]>, Jack
    >>>> Campin wrote:
    >>>>> I think "nuke" (in the microwave) is American, though.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Nuke" is far from unknown here in the UK, but my own preference is for
    >>>> "radar".
    >>>>
    >>>> RADAR (in the Direction And Rangefinding sense) being another
    >>>> application of microwave technology (yeah, the "RA..." bit is supposed
    >>>> to stand for "RAdio", but microwaves are really just very high
    >>>> frequency radio waves).
    >>>>
    >>>> "This coffee's gone cold ... I'll stick it in the radar ..."
    >>>
    >>> Recall that the first widely-known model of microwave oven for home use was the
    >>> "Amana Radarange" (inspiring a visual gag in the movie "Airplane!")...
    >>>
    >>> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite" ("just drove
    >>> past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in his back yard!")?...r

    >>
    >> "Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that our
    >> Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >>

    > <chuckle>
    >
    > In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on the
    > ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.
    >
    >


    But is it very unusual for a plant to be mounted on a building and
    therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a satellite dish?

    e.g. http://www.garden.org/images/App/articles/1281a.jpg

    --
    Jared

  7. #107
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:50:58 +0100, janice <[email protected]> wrote:

    > I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers use the
    > term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period of time.
    >
    > What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of "blitz"?
    >
    > Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why is it
    > so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good existing word?


    Well, that was a boring topic that didn't interest anyone in rfc until
    thread drift happened. Are you in the habit of crossposting or do you
    normally stick to trolling?

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  8. #108
    I'm back Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:50:58 +0100, janice <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers
    >> use the term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period
    >> of time.
    >>
    >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of
    >> "blitz"?
    >>
    >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    >> is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good
    >> existing word?

    >
    > Well, that was a boring topic that didn't interest anyone in rfc until
    > thread drift happened. Are you in the habit of crossposting or do you
    > normally stick to trolling?
    >



    I had to have a chuckle though..... a (supposed) Pom getting upset at the
    word "blitz".

    I keep hearing Basil from "Fawlty Towers"........

    "No loud noises, don't talk about the war!!" :-)

  9. #109
    Peter Duncanson [BrE] Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 08:21:55 -0400, Jared <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On 10/14/2012 6:39 AM, Peter Duncanson (BrE) wrote:
    >> On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:
    >>>> Daniel James filted:
    >>>>>
    >>>>> In article<[email protected]>, Jack
    >>>>> Campin wrote:
    >>>>>> I think "nuke" (in the microwave) is American, though.
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "Nuke" is far from unknown here in the UK, but my own preference is for
    >>>>> "radar".
    >>>>>
    >>>>> RADAR (in the Direction And Rangefinding sense) being another
    >>>>> application of microwave technology (yeah, the "RA..." bit is supposed
    >>>>> to stand for "RAdio", but microwaves are really just very high
    >>>>> frequency radio waves).
    >>>>>
    >>>>> "This coffee's gone cold ... I'll stick it in the radar ..."
    >>>>
    >>>> Recall that the first widely-known model of microwave oven for home use was the
    >>>> "Amana Radarange" (inspiring a visual gag in the movie "Airplane!")...
    >>>>
    >>>> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite" ("just drove
    >>>> past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in his back yard!")?...r
    >>>
    >>> "Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that our
    >>> Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >>>

    >> <chuckle>
    >>
    >> In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on the
    >> ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.
    >>
    >>

    >
    >But is it very unusual for a plant to be mounted on a building and
    >therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a satellite dish?
    >
    >e.g. http://www.garden.org/images/App/articles/1281a.jpg


    Ah yes. Multiple dishes looking at multiple satellites. at least one of
    which is either below ground or on the other side of the Earth.

    --
    Peter Duncanson, UK
    (in alt.usage.english)

  10. #110
    Evan Kirshenbaum Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    "Peter Duncanson (BrE)" <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:


    >>> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite"
    >>> ("just drove past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in
    >>> his back yard!")?...r

    >>
    >>"Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that
    >>our Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >>

    > <chuckle>
    >
    > In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on the
    > ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.


    Did you guys go through the phase where it was common, especially in
    out-of-the-way places, for people to have 10-or-so-foot-diameter
    C-band satellite dishes? Not to many of those mounted on rooftops.

    --
    Evan Kirshenbaum +------------------------------------
    Still with HP Labs |To find the end of Middle English,
    SF Bay Area (1982-) |you discover the exact date and
    Chicago (1964-1982) |time the Great Vowel Shift took
    |place (the morning of May 5, 1450,
    [email protected] |at some time between neenuh fiftehn
    |and nahyn twenty-fahyv).
    http://www.kirshenbaum.net/ | Kevin Wald



  11. #111
    Daniel James Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1
    wrote:
    > I'd think those are words parents tell their toddlers to call
    > genitals, zhush for girl thingies and splork for boy thingies. lol


    Those are your pudenda -- they are nothing to be ashamed of!

    Cheers,
    Daniel.



  12. #112
    Dr Nick Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    Evan Kirshenbaum <[email protected]> writes:

    > "Peter Duncanson (BrE)" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:

    >
    >>>> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite"
    >>>> ("just drove past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in
    >>>> his back yard!")?...r
    >>>
    >>>"Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that
    >>>our Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >>>

    >> <chuckle>
    >> In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on
    >> the ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.

    >
    > Did you guys go through the phase where it was common, especially in
    > out-of-the-way places, for people to have 10-or-so-foot-diameter
    > C-band satellite dishes? Not to many of those mounted on rooftops.


    No. We went VHF, UHF and then - at roughly the same time - (fibre)
    cable and small satellite dishes.

    We did have some coax cable - Rediffusion springs to mind - but it was
    pretty niche: I never met anyone who had it.

    Remember that a large chunk of our population live in towns and cities
    with very little land. If I'd had a 10-foot diameter dish when I lived
    in the cottage, it would have pretty-well filled by entire "enclosed
    courtyard garden" (the house was a terrace, 13 foot wide, so the yard
    was the same width and not a lot deeper).

  13. #113
    Nancy Young Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    What timing, I'm watching Luther on BBCA and the lead investigator
    described a murder as a blitz attack.

    Of course, there was no blender involved, but I get the idea.

    nancy

  14. #114
    James Silverton Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/14/2012 3:13 PM, Daniel James wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Brooklyn1
    > wrote:
    >> I'd think those are words parents tell their toddlers to call
    >> genitals, zhush for girl thingies and splork for boy thingies. lol

    >
    > Those are your pudenda -- they are nothing to be ashamed of!
    >


    But, to quote the OED:
    classical Latin pudendum, lit. ‘that of which one ought to be ashamed’


    --
    Jim Silverton (Potomac, MD)

    Extraneous "not" in Reply To.

  15. #115
    Bill McCray Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 10/14/2012 2:11 PM, Evan Kirshenbaum wrote:
    > "Peter Duncanson (BrE)"<[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:

    >
    >>>> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite"
    >>>> ("just drove past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in
    >>>> his back yard!")?...r
    >>>
    >>> "Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that
    >>> our Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >>>

    >> <chuckle>
    >>
    >> In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on the
    >> ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.

    >
    > Did you guys go through the phase where it was common, especially in
    > out-of-the-way places, for people to have 10-or-so-foot-diameter
    > C-band satellite dishes? Not to many of those mounted on rooftops.


    Right, those are what I was talking about.

    Bill in Kentucky




  16. #116
    Brooklyn1 Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 15:42:31 -0400, Nancy Young <replyto@inemail>
    wrote:

    >What timing, I'm watching Luther on BBCA and the lead investigator
    >described a murder as a blitz attack.
    >
    >Of course, there was no blender involved, but I get the idea.
    >
    >nancy


    In the olden days when organized crime did a murder they'd haul the
    body to a saw-seege factory where there were huge blenders, if you get
    my drift... bologna sandwich anyone? hehe

  17. #117
    Peter Duncanson (BrE) Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 20:26:30 +0100, Dr Nick
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Evan Kirshenbaum <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> "Peter Duncanson (BrE)" <[email protected]> writes:
    >>
    >>> On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    >>> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:

    >>
    >>>>> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite"
    >>>>> ("just drove past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in
    >>>>> his back yard!")?...r
    >>>>
    >>>>"Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that
    >>>>our Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >>>>
    >>> <chuckle>
    >>> In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on
    >>> the ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.

    >>
    >> Did you guys go through the phase where it was common, especially in
    >> out-of-the-way places, for people to have 10-or-so-foot-diameter
    >> C-band satellite dishes? Not to many of those mounted on rooftops.

    >
    >No. We went VHF, UHF and then - at roughly the same time - (fibre)
    >cable and small satellite dishes.
    >
    >We did have some coax cable - Rediffusion springs to mind - but it was
    >pretty niche: I never met anyone who had it.
    >
    >Remember that a large chunk of our population live in towns and cities
    >with very little land. If I'd had a 10-foot diameter dish when I lived
    >in the cottage, it would have pretty-well filled by entire "enclosed
    >courtyard garden" (the house was a terrace, 13 foot wide, so the yard
    >was the same width and not a lot deeper).


    And the dish might not have been able to see the satellite.

    We are at a relatively high latitude here in the UK. The TV satellites
    are only 23 +/- degrees above the horizontal.

    Information on erecting a dish on the North-West wall of a house
    (satellites are to the South-East-ish).
    http://www.wrightsaerials.tv/referen...ed-by-roof.pdf


    --
    Peter Duncanson, UK
    (in alt.english.usage)

  18. #118
    sf Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On Sun, 14 Oct 2012 13:41:50 +0000 (UTC), "I'm back" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > sf <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 23:50:58 +0100, janice <[email protected]> wrote:
    > >
    > >> I am in the UK and nowadays see many TV chefs and newspaper writers
    > >> use the term "to blitz" to mean to use a blender for a short period
    > >> of time.
    > >>
    > >> What's wrong with "use the blender" or even "blend" instead of
    > >> "blitz"?
    > >>
    > >> Presumably the verb "to blitz" has come from American English but why
    > >> is it so widespread when all it doesis replace a perfectly good
    > >> existing word?

    > >
    > > Well, that was a boring topic that didn't interest anyone in rfc until
    > > thread drift happened. Are you in the habit of crossposting or do you
    > > normally stick to trolling?
    > >

    >
    >
    > I had to have a chuckle though..... a (supposed) Pom getting upset at the
    > word "blitz".
    >
    > I keep hearing Basil from "Fawlty Towers"........
    >
    > "No loud noises, don't talk about the war!!" :-)


    Don't flatter yourself. Nobody here is upset about a word.

    --
    I take life with a grain of salt, a slice of lemon and a shot of tequila

  19. #119
    Robert Bannister Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 14/10/12 8:45 AM, R H Draney wrote:
    > Daniel James filted:
    >>
    >> In article <[email protected]>, Jack
    >> Campin wrote:
    >>> I think "nuke" (in the microwave) is American, though.

    >>
    >> "Nuke" is far from unknown here in the UK, but my own preference is for
    >> "radar".
    >>
    >> RADAR (in the Direction And Rangefinding sense) being another
    >> application of microwave technology (yeah, the "RA..." bit is supposed
    >> to stand for "RAdio", but microwaves are really just very high
    >> frequency radio waves).
    >>
    >> "This coffee's gone cold ... I'll stick it in the radar ..."

    >
    > Recall that the first widely-known model of microwave oven for home use was the
    > "Amana Radarange" (inspiring a visual gag in the movie "Airplane!")...
    >
    > Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite" ("just drove
    > past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in his back yard!")?...r
    >
    >


    I do hear "They've got satellite" (no "a") nearly as much as "They've
    got a dish" - the latter is a bit ambiguous, so "satellite TV" is used
    rather more.

    --
    Robert Bannister

  20. #120
    Robert Bannister Guest

    Default Re: Use of "blitz" to mean using a blender.

    On 15/10/12 2:11 AM, Evan Kirshenbaum wrote:
    > "Peter Duncanson (BrE)" <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    >> On Sat, 13 Oct 2012 21:15:46 -0400, Bill McCray
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 10/13/2012 8:45 PM, R H Draney wrote:

    >
    >>>> Do people anywhere still refer to a dish antenna as a "satellite"
    >>>> ("just drove past Smith's place; he's got a goddam satellite in
    >>>> his back yard!")?...r
    >>>
    >>> "Satellite dish" was what I remember always hearing. I heard that
    >>> our Legislature want to make it our state flower.
    >>>

    >> <chuckle>
    >>
    >> In the UK it is very unusual for a satellite dish to be mounted on the
    >> ground and therefore able to be jokingly thought of as a plant.

    >
    > Did you guys go through the phase where it was common, especially in
    > out-of-the-way places, for people to have 10-or-so-foot-diameter
    > C-band satellite dishes? Not to many of those mounted on rooftops.
    >


    Yes. Before that, it was 100 foot high radio masts.

    --
    Robert Bannister

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